Mazda FE-DOHC engine

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Mazda FE-DOHC
Overview
Manufacturer Mazda
Also called FE-DE, FE-ZE and FE3
Production Hiroshima, Japan
Hofu, Japan
Combustion chamber
Displacement 1998 cc
Cylinder bore 86 mm
Piston stroke 86 mm
Cylinder block alloy Cast iron
Cylinder head alloy Aluminium
Valvetrain DOHC 16-valve
Compression ratio 8.8:1, 9.2:1, 9.5:1, 10:1
Combustion
Fuel system EFI
Fuel type Petrol
Cooling system Water
Output
Power output 140 ps, 145 ps, 148 ps, 150 ps and 165 ps
Specific power 54kW/L
Torque output 133 lbs/ft (182 Nm), 150 lbs/ft (203 Nm)
Chronology
Predecessor Mazda FE
Successor Mazda FS, Mazda L-engine, MZR

The Mazda FE-DOHC was the DOHC variant of the FE. The official Mazda engine codes are FE-DE and FE-ZE, depending on output level. It is still commonly called the FE3 because of its head castings. The FE-DOHC shares the same dimensions as the original FE-SOHC, including the square 86 mm bore × stroke and it has an ideal 1.74 rod/stroke ratio. The FE-DOHC is usually identified by a gold-coloured cam cover, however not always. There were at least five different FE-DOHC engines available with various compression ratio, camshaft and ECU tuning combinations, however none were fitted with a turbocharger from the factory. Despite this, the FE-DOHC is already built for turbo with large forged connecting rods, large journal dimensions, oil cooler, piston oilers, web-stiffened block with main girdles (and braceplate where equipped). This robust engine design is a favourite of tuners who are aware of its capability because it already has a high-power capacity perfect for custom turbo jobs. As much as 600 whp has been seen on a stock engine. The common FE-DOHC crankshaft is cast while the forged crankshaft is fitted to the aluminum sump engines with both the main bearing braces and the main bearing girdle plate. In European 10.0:1 compression, non-catalytic trim, the FE-DOHC produces 148 ps (108 kW) at 6000 rpm and 133 lb/ft (182 Nm) at 4000 rpm. The 9.2:1 compression, catalytic converter version produces 140 ps. The Japanese domestic market variants produce anywhere between 145 ps and 165 ps. The only vehicle with 165ps was the 96-97 Capellas Wagons, FX (MT or AT) or FX Cruising (Only exists in AT). They had different tail lights to the earlier wagons.

Applications[edit]

The FE-DOHC was a European and Japanese market engine only (excluding use by Kia), and as such was only ever delivered in vehicles by Mazda to countries in those markets, with the exception of New Zealand who also received European market models. The engine was first fitted to the GD model 1988-1992 626 GT, 1987-1991 Capella and the 626 Coupe GT 2.0i/Capella C2 GT-X and GT-R. In South Africa, Samcor who built Mazdas under licence also fitted the FE-DOHC engine to the Mazda 323 from 1991 to 1994.

Alongside the sedan, hatch and coupe models the FE-DOHC was also being used in the GV wagon, which ran until 1997.

The rest of the world received the FE-DOHC in the 1995–2003 Kia Sportage, built by Kia under license. Kia first introduced the engine in March 1992, when they installed it in the Kia Concord, a license built version of the 1982 Mazda Capella. The Sportage variant was reconfigured for rear-wheel drive configuration with long single-runner intake manifold, low-duration cams and exclusively in the low compression ratio of 9.2:1.


Different Models[edit]

1.8 cargo Wagon SV 08.1992 - 09.1994 18114 FF MT G 1.8 F8 115 E-GV8W
1.8 cargo Wagon SV 08.1992 - 09.1994 19147 FF AT G 1.8 F8 115 E-GV8W
1.8 cargo Wagon SX 08.1992 - 09.1994 21379 FF MT G 1.8 F8 115 E-GV8W
1.8 cargo Wagon SX 08.1992 - 09.1994 22412 FF AT G 1.8 F8 115 E-GV8W
1.8 Wagon SV 10.1994 - 06.1996 18936 FF MT G 1.8 F8 115 E-GV8W
1.8 Wagon SV 10.1994 - 06.1996 19969 FF AT G 1.8 F8 115 E-GV8W
1.8 Wagon SV 07.1996 - 10.1997 18936 FF MT G 1.8 F8-DE 115 E-GV8W
1.8 Wagon SV 07.1996 - 10.1997 19969 FF AT G 1.8 F8-DE 115 E-GV8W
1.8 Wagon SV-F 07.1996 - 10.1997 21890 FF AT G 1.8 F8-DE 115 E-GV8W
1.8 Wagon SX 10.1994 - 06.1996 22190 FF AT G 1.8 F8 115 E-GV8W
1.8 Wagon SX 07.1996 - 10.1997 22190 FF AT G 1.8 F8-DE 115 E-GV8W
2.0 cargo Wagon GT 10.1990 - 07.1992 22812 4WD MT G 2.0 FE 150 E-GVER
2.0 cargo Wagon GT 10.1990 - 07.1992 23845 4WD AT G 2.0 FE 145 E-GVER
2.0 cargo Wagon GT 08.1992 - 09.1994 25299 4WD MT G 2.0 FE 150 Y-GVER
2.0 cargo Wagon GT 08.1992 - 09.1994 26332 4WD AT G 2.0 FE 145 Y-GVER
2.0 Wagon FX 10.1994 - 06.1996 25610 4WD MT G 2.0 FE 150 E-GVER
2.0 Wagon FX 10.1994 - 06.1996 26643 4WD AT G 2.0 FE 145 E-GVER
2.0 Wagon FX 07.1996 - 10.1997 26599 4WD MT G 2.0 FE-ZE 165 E-GVER
2.0 Wagon FX 07.1996 - 10.1997 27632 4WD AT G 2.0 FE-ZE 165 E-GVER
2.0 Wagon FX cruising 07.1996 - 10.1997 28076 4WD AT G 2.0 FE-ZE 165 E-GVER
2.0 Wagon SV 10.1994 - 06.1996 24411 4WD AT G 2.0 FE 145 E-GVER
2.0 Wagon SV 07.1996 - 10.1997 21079 FF AT G 2.0 FE-DE 145 E-GVEW
2.0 Wagon SV 07.1996 - 10.1997 24600 4WD AT G 2.0 FE-DE 145 E-GVER
2.0 Wagon SX cruising 07.1996 - 10.1997 24944 FF AT G 2.0 FE-DE 145 E-GVEW


Head and valvetrain[edit]

The Mazda FE-DOHC uses a wide-angle, DOHC, belt-driven valvetrain configuration with flat-tappet 33 mm HLA bucket lifters. It is a non-interference design. There are two valve springs per valve and four valves per cylinder. While a dual valve spring configuration is used, the stock springs are fairly low-sprung. Low spring rates were chosen for increased valvetrain longevity and low friction with the dual valve springs for the reduction of harmonics and increased valve stability.

Camshafts[edit]

The Mazda FE-DOHC came with several different camshaft profiles from the factory. As such there were several camshaft combinations available.

Camshaft Lift (mm) Duration (deg)
FE5A 8.855 250°
FE3N 8.852 245°
FEAP 8.650 230
KO13  ?  ?
F8K1 6.800 225

The F8K1 was the intake camshaft for the F8-DOHC, only listed due to family ties.

The combinations available:

Intake Exhaust
FE5A FE5A
FE3N FE3N
FEAP FE3N
FE3N KO13
F8K1 FE3N

VICS[edit]

The FE-DOHC featured Mazda's VICS system, short for Variable Inertia Control System, a variable intake setup to optimize runner length and resonance at different engine speeds. Much like Toyota's Acoustic Control Induction System, it had two sets of intake runners, a long set for low-medium RPMs, and a short set for high RPMs. It was operated by a vacuum solenoid based on the engine's current speed, actuating a pair of butterflies inside the manifold to open or close the short runners past 5400 RPM. This system has been used on many Mazda engines since including the BP. The K-series V6 engines used a different principle to the same effect dubbed VRIS.

Head gasket compatibility[edit]

The head gasket used on the Kia version can be sourced in North America, but the builder must note that the coolant passage holes are configured for a RWD cooling system. Attempting to use the RWD head gasket in FWD cooling configuration will result in improper flow and can result in overheating of cylinder #4. The Australian Kia Parts Desk is supplying FWD head gaskets; possibly not the best news for Kia owners, however good news for genuine Mazda FE3 owners.[citation needed]

References[edit]

External links[edit]