Meadow Garden (Augusta, Georgia)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
George Walton House
Meadow Garden Augusta Georgia.jpg
Meadow Garden, 2006
Meadow Garden (Augusta, Georgia) is located in Georgia (U.S. state)
Meadow Garden (Augusta, Georgia)
Meadow Garden (Augusta, Georgia) is located in the US
Meadow Garden (Augusta, Georgia)
Location 1320 Independence Drive, Augusta, Georgia, 30901
Coordinates 33°28′26″N 81°58′47″W / 33.47376°N 81.97979°W / 33.47376; -81.97979Coordinates: 33°28′26″N 81°58′47″W / 33.47376°N 81.97979°W / 33.47376; -81.97979
Area 0.4 acres (0.16 ha)
Built 1794
NRHP Reference # 76000646
Significant dates
Added to NRHP July 19, 1976[1]
Designated NHL December 21, 1981

Meadow Garden is a historic house museum at 1320 Independence Drive in Augusta, Georgia. It was a home of George Walton (1749–1804), one of Georgia's three signers of the U.S. Declaration of Independence, and later a governor of Georgia and a United States Senator. Meadow Garden was saved and established as a museum by the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1901. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1981.

Description and history[edit]

Meadow Garden is located on the west side of downtown Augusta, separated from the Augusta Canal by the Augusta Canal Historic Walking Trail, and just east of the Sutherland Mill. It is a 1-1/2 story wood frame structure, set on a high brick basement. It was built in stages, originally three bays in width, but is now six, with three gabled dormers and two chimneys projecting from the gabled roof. A shed-roof porch extends across the front, supported by slender Doric columns. The facade is irregularly arranged, with two doors and four windows.[2]

The oldest portion of the house, its right three bays, was built in 1791. The left three bays were added sometime after 1800, and the front porch was also probably added at a later date. Although the property was never owned by him, it was from 1791 to his death in 1804 the home of George Walton, a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence. Trained as a lawyer, he served in the Continental Congress (1776–81) and in the Georgia militia, in whose service he was captured by the British during the 1778 Capture of Savannah. Exchanged and released, he was soon afterward elected Governor of Georgia, an office he held from November 1779 to January 1780. He also served as the state's Chief Justice, and in a second term as Governor 1789-80. He died at College Hill, his country house, in 1804.[2] The house passed out of the Walton family in 1812, and is now owned and operated as a museum by the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2007-01-23). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b "NHL nomination for Meadow Garden" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-01-03. 

External links[edit]