Meanings of minor planet names: 288001–289000

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As minor planet discoveries are confirmed, they are given a permanent number by the IAU's Minor Planet Center, and the discoverers can then submit names for them, following the IAU's naming conventions. The list below concerns those minor planets in the specified number-range that have received names, and explains the meanings of those names. The official naming citations have been published in MPC's Minor Planet Circulars and in Lutz D. Schmadel's Dictionary of Minor Planet Names.[1][2][3] Meanings marked with or * are from legacy sources may contain errors.

288001–288100[edit]

Named minor planet Provisional This minor planet was named for... Ref · Catalog
There are no named minor planets in this number range

288101–288200[edit]

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Named minor planet Provisional This minor planet was named for... Ref · Catalog
There are no named minor planets in this number range

288201–288300[edit]

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Named minor planet Provisional This minor planet was named for... Ref · Catalog
There are no named minor planets in this number range

288301–288400[edit]

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Named minor planet Provisional This minor planet was named for... Ref · Catalog
There are no named minor planets in this number range

288401–288500[edit]

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Named minor planet Provisional This minor planet was named for... Ref · Catalog
288478 Fahlman 2004 FA17 Gregory Fahlman (born 1944) has served since 2003 as the Director General of the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada. He has made extensive contributions to studies of globular star clusters using ground- and space-based telescopes. JPL · 288478

288501–288600[edit]

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Named minor planet Provisional This minor planet was named for... Ref · Catalog
There are no named minor planets in this number range

288601–288700[edit]

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Named minor planet Provisional This minor planet was named for... Ref · Catalog
There are no named minor planets in this number range

288701–288800[edit]

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Named minor planet Provisional This minor planet was named for... Ref · Catalog
There are no named minor planets in this number range

288801–288900[edit]

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Named minor planet Provisional This minor planet was named for... Ref · Catalog
There are no named minor planets in this number range

288901–289000[edit]

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Named minor planet Provisional This minor planet was named for... Ref · Catalog
288960 Steponasdarius 2004 TN16 Steponas Darius (Steponas Darašius; 1896–1933), was a Lithuanian American pilot. In 1933, he and Stasys Girėnas (see below) attempted a nonstop flight from New York City to Kaunas, Lithuania. They crossed the Atlantic in 37 hours, but died when their plane crashed near the village of Kuhdamm, near Soldin, Germany. JPL · 288960
288961 Stasysgirėnas 2004 TZ19 Stasys Girėnas (1893–1933) was a Lithuanian American pilot. In 1933, he and Steponas Darius (see above) attempted a nonstop flight from New York City to Kaunas, Lithuania. They crossed the Atlantic in 37 hours, but died when their plane crashed near the village of Kuhdamm, near Soldin, Germany. JPL · 288961

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 27 July 2016. 
  2. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2006). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – Addendum to Fifth Edition: 2003–2005. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-34360-8. Retrieved 27 July 2016. 
  3. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 27 July 2016. 


Preceded by
287,001–288,000
Meanings of minor planet names
List of minor planets: 288,001–289,000
Succeeded by
289,001–290,000