Meanings of minor planet names: 91001–92000

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This is a partial list of meanings of minor planet names. See meanings of minor planet names for a list of all such partial lists.

As minor planet discoveries are confirmed, they are given a permanent number by the IAU's Minor Planet Center, and the discoverers can then submit names for them, following the IAU's naming conventions. The list below concerns those minor planets in the specified number-range that have received names, and explains the meanings of those names.

Besides the Minor Planet Circulars (in which the citations are published), a key source is Lutz D. Schmadel's Dictionary of Minor Planet Names, among others.[1][2][3] Meanings that do not quote a reference (the "†" links) are tentative. Meanings marked with an asterisk (*) are guesswork, and should be checked against the mentioned sources to ensure that the identification is correct.

91001–91100[edit]

Number–Name Prov. Designation Source of Name
91006 Fleming 1998 BT25 Alexander Fleming, 19th-20th-century Scottish biologist, pharmacologist, and Nobelist, discoverer of penicillin JPL
91007 Ianfleming 1998 BL30 Ian Lancaster Fleming, 20th-century British writer and journalist, creator of the character James Bond ("007") JPL
91023 Lutan 1998 DQ32 Lu Tan (born 1932), an astrophysicist and academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. JPL
91024 Széchenyi 1998 DA33 Count István Széchenyi, "The Greatest Hungarian", 18th-19th-century Hungarian writer, reformer and patriot JPL

91101–91200[edit]

Number–Name Prov. Designation Source of Name
91199 Johngray 1998 SS147 John Gray, British philosopher JPL

91201–91300[edit]

Number–Name Prov. Designation Source of Name
91213 Botchan 1998 YZ7 91213 Botchan Discovered 1998 Dec. 22 by A. Nakamura at Kuma Kogen. Botchan is one of the most popular novels in Japan, written by Soseki Natsume in 1906. The story is based on the author's personal experience as a Tokyo-born young teacher being transferred to the city of Matsuyama, which is the stage of the novel.JPL
91214 Diclemente 1998 YB10 Aldo Di Clemente, Italian amateur astronomer, technician at the Campo Imperatore station of the Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Astronomical Observatory of Rome) JPL
91275 Billsmith 1999 EW5 William S. (Bill) Smith Jr. (b. 1947) was for 15 years president of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), which operates NSO, NOAO, STScI, Gemini and LSST. JPL
91287 Simon-Garfunkel 1999 FP21 Simon and Garfunkel, American popular music duo of the 1960s JPL

91301–91400[edit]

Number–Name Prov. Designation Source of Name
91395 Sakanouenokumo 1999 LM1 91395 Sakanouenokumo Discovered 1999 June 5 by A. Nakamura at Kuma Kogen. Sakanoue no Kumo is a Japanese novel, written by Ryotaro Shiba between 1968 and 1972. Based on the true story of three young men who lived in Matsuyama in the Meiji Period, this novel expresses the aspiration to western culture in Japan, which was en route to modernization.JPL

91401–91500[edit]

Number–Name Prov. Designation Source of Name
91422 Giraudon 1999 OH Edmond Giraudon, French professor of mechanical engineering and popularizer of astronomy, who initiated the construction of five observatories in several high schools (in the Provence Alpes, Côte d'Azur and Languedoc Roussillon regions of France) JPL
91428 Cortesi 1999 QT1 Sergio Cortesi, Italian astronomer, director of the Specola Solare Locarno-Monti (Locarno-Monti Solar Observatory) since 1957 JPL
91429 Michelebianda 1999 QO2 Michele Bianda, (Swiss or Italian?) scientific director of the Istituto Ricerche Solari (Solar Research Institute) in Locarno JPL

91501–91600[edit]

Number–Name Prov. Designation Source of Name
91553 Claudedoom 1999 RD214 91553 Claudedoom Discovered 1999 Sept. 8 by T. Pauwels at Uccle. Claude Doom (b. 1958) edited the Belgian astronomical magazine Heelal during 1994--1998 and is still a board member of the Flemish Amateur Astronomers Association. He wrote his Ph.D. thesis on the evolution of massive stars. The name was suggested by S. De Jonge, C. Steyaert and J. Meeus.JPL

91601–91700[edit]

Number–Name Prov. Designation Source of Name
91604 Clausmadsen 1999 TN19 91604 Clausmadsen Discovered 1999 Oct. 14 by T. Pauwels and H. Boffin at Uccle. Claus Madsen (b. 1951), senior counsellor for international relations at the European Southern Observatory, has played a crucial role in increasing public awareness and interest in astronomy. He helped create the European Association for Astronomy Education and was key in having the U.N. pass the IYA resolution.JPL
91607 Delaboudiniere 1999 TP20 Jean-Pierre Delaboudinière (b. 1940), a French astronomer. JPL

91701–91800[edit]

Number–Name Prov. Designation Source of Name
There are no named minor planets in this number range

91801–91900[edit]

Number–Name Prov. Designation Source of Name
91888 Tomskilling 1999 UA51 Thomas (Tom) Ethelbert Skilling, III (b. 1952), a meteorologist on WGN-TV in Chicago. JPL
91890 Kiriko Matsuri 1999 VD2 Kiriko Matsuri, "Kiriko festival"; kirikos are big Japanese lanterns, up to 15 m high and 2 tons in weight JPL
91898 Margnetti 1999 VB11 91898 Margnetti Discovered 1999 Nov. 8 by S. Sposetti at Gnosca. Giuseppe Margnetti (b. 1960) is a keen winemaker and artist living in the Swiss town of Camorino with his wife Danila (née Cosner).JPL

91901–92000[edit]

Number–Name Prov. Designation Source of Name
91907 Shiho 1999 VA26 91907 Shiho Discovered 1999 Nov. 13 by A. Nakamura at Kuma Kogen. Shiho Ochi (b. 1984), born in Ehime prefecture, is the vocalist of the band "Superfly". Since their major debut in 2007 with Hello Hello, her rich voice and the band's soulful rock-and-roll music have fascinated many fans in Japan, including the discoverer.JPL

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 27 July 2016. 
  2. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2006). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – Addendum to Fifth Edition: 2003–2005. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-34360-8. Retrieved 27 July 2016. 
  3. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 27 July 2016. 


Preceded by
90,001–91,000
Meanings of minor planet names
List of minor planets: 91,001–92,000
Succeeded by
92,001–93,000