Media Rights Capital

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Media Rights Capital
Private
Industry Film
Television
Founded 2006; 12 years ago (2006) (Film)[1]
2008; 10 years ago (2008) (Television)[1]
Founder Modi Wiczyk
Asif Satchu
Headquarters Beverly Hills, California, United States
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Modi Wiczyk (co-CEO)
Asif Satchu (co-CEO)
Scott Tenley (COO)
Louis Santor (CFO)
Website www.mrcstudios.com

Media Rights Capital (abbreviated as MRC) is an American independent film and television studio founded by Mordecai (Modi) Wiczyk and Asif Satchu. MRC specializes in the creation of premium content. It has full in-house development, physical production, legal, finance and corporate development teams. MRC has distributed its films through many major domestic and international distributors in the industry. MRC's best-known productions include House of Cards and several films by Universal Pictures.

MRC’s investors include Guggenheim Partners, AT&T, WPP Group, Goldman Sachs and ABRY Partners.[2][3]

On February 1, 2018, Eldridge Industries formed Valence Media, a new media company consisting of Media Rights Capital, The Hollywood Reporter, Dick Clark Productions, and Billboard.[4]

Film projects[edit]

Television projects[edit]

Upcoming

Current

Previous

The CW's Sunday night programming[edit]

MRC was also responsible for programming The CW's Sunday-night lineup during the 2008–2009 season through a time-leasing arrangement. The first shows to air included the reality show In Harm's Way and the dramas Valentine and Easy Money.[11] Each show had an initial order of 13 episodes.

On November 10, 2008, MRC cancelled two of the four shows it produced for The CW. (Both Valentine and Easy Money were put on hiatus with skeleton crews while more scripts were written.) It was expected that MRC would deliver two replacement shows in their place.[12] The CW decided instead to take back control of its Sunday night schedule after the MRC block from the beginning trailed the ratings of CW's Sunday night the year before by a considerable margin.[13][14][15] The network then decided to return the Sunday timeslots to its affiliates as of the 2009-10 season.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "About MRC". Media Rights Capital. Retrieved 30 June 2012. 
  2. ^ Bond, Paul (2013-02-13). "Media Rights Capital Raises $175 Million to Co-Finance Movies". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 2016-03-09. 
  3. ^ Shaw, Lucas (2014-05-06). "Guggenheim Invests $240 Million in 'House of Cards' Producer Media Rights Capital". The Wrap. Retrieved 2016-03-09. 
  4. ^ Andrew Wallenstein (2018-02-01). "Media Rights Capital, Dick Clark Prods., THR-Billboard Combine Company – Variety". Variety. Retrieved 2018-04-17. 
  5. ^ "22 Jump Street". mrcstudios.com. Retrieved 2016-03-09. 
  6. ^ Babel on IMDb
  7. ^ "Showtime Developing Novel 'Super Sad True Love Story' with Ben Stiller Directing (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety.com. Retrieved 2016-01-25. 
  8. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (2015-06-05). "Damián Szifrón Sci-Fi Limited Series In Works At MRC". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 2016-03-09. 
  9. ^ Fleming Jr., Mike (2016-02-22). "'The Witch' Helmer Robert Eggers To Write, Direct Rasputin Miniseries For MRC". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 2016-03-09. 
  10. ^ "JK Simmons To Star In Starz Drama Series From 'The Imitation Game' Director". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 2015-04-22. 
  11. ^ "MRC Unveils Four Shows for CW Sunday". zap2it.com. Archived from the original on 2008-05-29. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  12. ^ Finke, Nikki. "MRC cancels two shows on the CW". Deadline Hollywood. 
  13. ^ CW Takes Back its Sunday Nights, Sets "Jericho" Reruns, TelevisionWeek, November 20, 2008
  14. ^ CW Dumps MRC Sunday Nights, Broadcasting & Cable, November 20, 2008
  15. ^ Carter, Bill (November 20, 2008). CW Says It Is Retaking Control of Its Sunday TV Lineup, The New York Times.
  16. ^ de Morales, Lisa (2009-05-21). "For Fall, CW Brings On the Suds -- and Vampires". The Washington Post. 

External links[edit]