Medina, Washington

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Medina, Washington
Location of Medina, Washington
Location of Medina, Washington
City limits of Medina
City limits of Medina
Coordinates: 47°37′36″N 122°13′58″W / 47.62667°N 122.23278°W / 47.62667; -122.23278Coordinates: 47°37′36″N 122°13′58″W / 47.62667°N 122.23278°W / 47.62667; -122.23278
CountryUnited States
StateWashington
CountyKing
Platted1914
IncorporatedAugust 19, 1955
Named forMedina, Saudi Arabia
Government
 • MayorCynthia Adkins[1]
Area
 • Total4.79 sq mi (12.41 km2)
 • Land1.44 sq mi (3.73 km2)
 • Water3.35 sq mi (8.68 km2)
Elevation
69 ft (21 m)
Population
 • Total2,969
 • Estimate 
(2015)[4]
3,226
 • Density2,061.8/sq mi (796.1/km2)
Time zoneUTC-8 (Pacific (PST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (PDT)
ZIP code
98039
Area code(s)425
FIPS code53-44725
GNIS feature ID1512453[5]
Websitewww.medina-wa.gov

Medina (/məˈdnə/ (About this soundlisten)) is a mostly residential city in Eastside, King County, Washington, United States.[6] The city is on a peninsula in Lake Washington, on the opposite shore from Seattle, bordered by Clyde Hill and Hunts Point to the east and water on all other sides. The city's population was 2,969 at the 2010 census. Billionaires Bill Gates and Jeff Bezos, along with a number of Microsoft executives, or other associates of Gates, have homes in Medina.[7][8]

History[edit]

The eastern shore of Lake Washington between Meydenbauer Bay and Evergreen Point was a sparsely-populated area that was cleared for its timber in the 1870s. Seattle businessman Thomas Dabney established a claim on the south side of modern-day Medina in 1886, becoming the area's first permanent white settler. Dabney built a ferry dock in 1890, naming it Dabney's Landing, while the surrounding area was turned into berry farms and fruit orchards. Other settlers arrived at Dabney's Landing, which was briefly named Flordeline by its founder until objections were raised by a group of women who proposed the Arabic name "Medina" in 1891. After a series of debates and sign-switching incidents, Medina won and was adopted as the name of the town.[9][6][10]

Medina was platted in 1914 and officially incorporated on August 19, 1955.[11] The town's first mansions were built in the 1920s by wealthy Seattle businessmen, encouraged by the arrival of direct ferry service, and led to the nickname of the "Gold Coast". The area's farmers, mostly of Japanese descent, were evicted during the 1940s internment and their farms were turned over for redevelopment.[6]

Surveillance[edit]

In 2009, Medina, with the "wide support of residents," installed cameras at intersections along roads entering the city.[12] The cameras are used to capture the license plate number of every car, and a security system automatically notifies local police if the captured number is recorded in a database.[13][14] Travellers are notified of the presence of the system with signs that read "You Are Entering a 24 Hour Video Surveillance Area"; according to Medina's police chief, all captured information is stored for 60 days even if nothing negative is found in the database, allowing police to mine data if a crime occurs later.[13] One of the city's council members said the system was motivated by the belief that the need for crime prevention "outweighs concern over privacy".[13] The system was inspired by that used in nearby Hunts Point, a town of about 500 residents which has not had a break-in for more than three years after installing their system.[13]

Tree Code[edit]

Designated as a Tree City USA by the Arbor Day Foundation since 2006,[15] Medina has always been a leader in urban tree codes. Since 1972, the City of Medina has codified the value that trees bring to a community, and the Tree Code ordinances have consistently been modified throughout the years. Major revisions in 2000, 2003 and 2006 have improved the code such that it is one of the most extensive in the region. The current code (2006 edition) protects large trees and requires significant mitigation if they are removed.[16]

In 2011, the City Council directed the Planning Commission to update the existing tree code. Dividing the task into two phases, the Planning Commission brought Phase I, which were largely administrative changes, to Council in 2014, where it was passed into law. Phase II changes have been underway since then, with much work and input from the community, an ad hoc tree committee, the Planning Commission and City Council. It is anticipated that the new code will be adopted in mid-2015.[17]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.79 square miles (12.41 km2), of which, 1.44 square miles (3.73 km2) is land and 3.35 square miles (8.68 km2) is water.[2]

Medina is connected to Seattle, on the western shore of Lake Washington, by State Route 520 on the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge, the longest floating bridge in the world.[18]

Climate[edit]

This region experiences warm (but not hot) and dry summers, with no average monthly temperatures above 71.6 °F. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Medina has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate, abbreviated "Csb" on climate maps.[19]

Government and politics[edit]

The City of Medina is a non-charter code city with a council–manager government.[20] The city council is composed of seven members elected in non-partisan, at-large elections to four-year terms. The council elects a ceremonial mayor and deputy mayor from its members, serving a two-year term, and appoint a city manager to execute its legislative policies and oversee the government.[21] The current city manager is Michael Sauerwein.[22]

Medina has traditionally been a Republican stronghold at the local and national levels. However, like neighboring communities, it has become more competitive between the two major parties in recent elections.[23]

State Level[edit]

Medina is part of the 48th Legislative District, and its currently legislators in the Washington State Legislature are:

The 48th district also includes the more Democratic leaning area of adjacent Bellevue.

Nationally[edit]

Medina is part of the 1st Congressional District. Its current Representative is Suzan DelBene.

As part of Washington State, Medina is represented by Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell.

In the 2012 US Presidential Election, the Republican nominee, Mitt Romney, received 1025 votes, while Barack Obama, the Democratic incumbent received 934 votes. Mitt Romney carried 3 out of the 4 precincts in Medina. In the 2008 US Presidential Election, Barack Obama received more votes than the Republican nominee, John McCain, and carried all 4 precincts.[24] In the 2016 US Presidential Election, of the 1,856 who cast votes, 57.49% voted for Hillary Clinton and 33.19% for Donald Trump.[25][citation needed]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19602,285
19703,45551.2%
19803,220−6.8%
19902,981−7.4%
20003,0111.0%
20102,969−1.4%
Est. 20163,246[26]9.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[27]
2015 Estimate[4]
Medina in 1915

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 2,969 people, 1,061 households, and 865 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,061.8 inhabitants per square mile (796.1/km2). There were 1,162 housing units at an average density of 806.9 per square mile (311.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 83.5% White, 0.3% African American, 0.2% Native American, 11.7% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.5% from other races, and 3.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.6% of the population.

There were 1,061 households of which 40.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.1% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 18.5% were non-families. 16.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.13.

The median age in the city was 45.5 years. 29% of residents were under the age of 18; 4.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 15.1% were from 25 to 44; 32.8% were from 45 to 64; and 18.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.4% male and 50.6% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 3,011 people, 1,111 households, and 905 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,102.3 people per square mile (813.0/km²). There were 1,165 housing units at an average density of 813.4 per square mile (314.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 92.63% White, 4.88% Asian, 0.27% Native American, 0.17% African American, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.33% from other races, and 1.66% from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 1.39% of the population.

There were 1,111 households out of which 38.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 74.6% were married couples living together, 5.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.5% were non-families. 14.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.00.

The age distribution was 30.1% under the age of 18, 3.5% from 18 to 24, 23.5% from 25 to 44, 29.6% from 45 to 64, and 16.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.6 males.

Notable people[edit]

Education[edit]

Public education is provided by the Bellevue School District, with schools within Medina and in nearby Bellevue. There are three schools in Medina:

  • Bellevue Christian School - Three Points Elementary (private, K to 6)[37]
  • Medina Elementary School (public, K to 5)[38]
  • Saint Thomas School (private, pre-K to 8)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "City Council". Archived from the original on December 27, 2017. Retrieved January 17, 2018.
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 24, 2012. Retrieved December 19, 2012.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 17, 2012. Retrieved December 19, 2012.
  4. ^ a b "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on October 19, 2016. Retrieved July 10, 2016.
  5. ^ "Medina". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  6. ^ a b c Dougherty, Phil (May 20, 2015). "Medina — Thumbnail History". HistoryLink. Archived from the original on December 16, 2018. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  7. ^ a b Ginsberg, Leah (July 27, 2017), "How Jeff Bezos, now the richest person in the world, spends his billions", CNBC, archived from the original on October 28, 2017, retrieved October 27, 2017
  8. ^ a b c Cornwall, Warren (January 31, 2004), "Gates spends $14 million, buys up homes in Washington state", The Chicago Tribune, Knight Ridder/Tribune: The Seattle Times, archived from the original on October 28, 2017, retrieved October 27, 2017
  9. ^ Cornwall, Warren (December 6, 2002). "A history with mansions". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on September 30, 2012. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  10. ^ McDonald, Lucile (October 30, 1955). "Pioneer Times In the 'Points Country'". The Seattle Times. p. 4.
  11. ^ History of Medina Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine from the city's official Website. Retrieved September 17, 2009.
  12. ^ Bach, Ashley (April 16, 2008). "Medina: enclave of wealth, land of squabbles". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on October 16, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  13. ^ a b c d Cameras keep track of all cars entering Medina Archived March 10, 2010, at the Wayback Machine, a September 16, 2009 article from The Seattle Times
  14. ^ Jacobs, Harrison. "Jeff Bezos has passed Bill Gates to become the richest person in the world — here's the secretive waterfront town where both billionaires live". Business Insider. Archived from the original on July 21, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  15. ^ "Tree Cities". Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved March 24, 2015.
  16. ^ "Medina Municipal Code". Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved March 24, 2015.
  17. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on December 17, 2014. Retrieved March 24, 2015.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  18. ^ "New 520 bridge to open in April; walkers, bicyclists get to try it first". The Seattle Times. 2016-01-12. Retrieved 2018-12-28.
  19. ^ "Medina, Washington Köppen Climate Classification (Weatherbase)".
  20. ^ "History of Medina". City of Medina. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018. Retrieved December 10, 2018.
  21. ^ "Accountability Audit Report - City of Medina - King County". Washington State Auditor's Office. October 3, 2016. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  22. ^ "Medina City Council". City of Medina. Archived from the original on September 11, 2018. Retrieved September 10, 2018.
  23. ^ Kantor, Jodi. "Liberal Republican Suburb Turns Furious With G.O.P." Archived from the original on June 25, 2018. Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  24. ^ "Creating a National Precinct Map – Decision Desk HQ". decisiondeskhq.com. Archived from the original on August 20, 2017. Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  25. ^ "2016 General - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset) | King County | Open Data". King County. Archived from the original on March 31, 2018. Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  26. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Archived from the original on May 29, 2017. Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  27. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved July 29, 2013.
  28. ^ Guglielmo, Connie; News, Bloomberg (June 18, 2008). "Microsoft director, industry veteran Jon Shirley will retire from board". seattlepi.com. Archived from the original on November 8, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  29. ^ "Pacific Northwest Magazine | Fresh Angles: The beauty is in the geometric interplay of design and function | Seattle Times Newspaper". community.seattletimes.nwsource.com. Archived from the original on November 23, 2011. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  30. ^ "Death of Costco co-founder Jeff Brotman, 74, 'a complete shock'". The Seattle Times. August 1, 2017. Archived from the original on August 15, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  31. ^ "Boy Scouts of America Leadership". www.rbvincent.com. Archived from the original on December 15, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  32. ^ a b "William Ruckelshaus, Gerald Grinstein celebrate 80th birthdays with salmon-fishing trip". The Seattle Times. July 21, 2012. Archived from the original on December 15, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  33. ^ "RSIR Represents Three of the Most Expensive Home Sales in 2018". Realogics SIR. 2018-10-30. Retrieved 2018-12-28.
  34. ^ Gutman, David (January 30, 2017). "Like Sally Yates, William Ruckelshaus said 'no' to a president — and got fired". The Seattle Times. The Seattle Times Company. Archived from the original on May 23, 2017. Retrieved May 12, 2017.
  35. ^ staff, Seattle Times (July 10, 2008). "Current and former Seattle Times staffers share their memories". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on December 15, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  36. ^ Schaefer, David (April 24, 1995). "Norton Clapp dies at age 89". The Seattle Times. p. A1.
  37. ^ Three Points Elementary website, retrieved online 2011-06-02 Archived December 12, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  38. ^ "Medina Elementary School website – Bellevue School District". Archived from the original on June 15, 2011. Retrieved June 2, 2011.

External links[edit]