Mehmed Şevkî Efendi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Mehmed Shevki Efendi)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Mehmed Şevki Efendi'nin kur'an hattı

Mehmed Shevki Efendi (Ottoman Turkish: محمد شوقي افندي‎, Modern Turkish: Mehmed Şevki Efendi) (1829 Kastamonu–1887 Istanbul) (alternative names: Muhammed Shawqi, Şevki Efendi), was a prominent Ottoman calligrapher. He is known for his Thuluth-Naskh works, and his style developed into the Shevki Mektebi school, which many contemporary calligraphers in the style take as a reference.[1]

Life and career[edit]

Born in Kastamonu, a town near the Black Sea, in 1887, Mehmed Shevki Efendi was the son of Ahmad Agha from Tajc.[2] He was sent to Istanbul at a young age, where he was raised by his uncle.[3]

He received his earliest formal training from his uncle, Mehmed Hulûsi Efendi (d. 1894) and obtained a Diploma at the age of fourteen. He was trained in the thuluth and the naskh scripts. Later, his uncle wanted him to study with a more experienced master, and sought to apprentice him to Kazasker Mustafa Izzet Efendi. However, the boy refused to study with any master, other than his uncle. Ultimately, he taught himself advanced techniques from calligraphic works of Hâfiz Osman and other great calligraphers. By remaining with his uncle, rather than joining a different school, Mehmed Şevkî had the freedom to develop his own style.[4] This style became known as û Şevki mektebi eb.[5] He certified a number of calligraphers, who went on to enjoy exceptional careers including Mohammad Hosni.

Şevkî Efendi was the last in a long line of calligraphers, beginning with Seyh Hamdullah in the 15th-century, who refined and improved the sülüs and naskh scripts. He achieved a "height of perfection never attained previously, nor surpassed since." [6]

He taught penmanship in the Ministry of War, where he trained military scribes and also worked in several schools.[7] He also taught calligraphy to the sons of Sultan Abdulhamid II.[8]

He died on 7 May, 1887 following a stroke and was buried next to his uncle, Hulûsi Efendi, in the Merkezefendi Cemetery. He was survived by three daughters and a son.[9]

Work[edit]

He wrote 25 copies of the Q'ran and also produced many personal prayer books.[10] He is the author of the work, The Thuluth & Naskh Mashqs. [11] His work also includes calligraphic compositions, which he signed "Muhammed Shawki".[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mehmed Şevkı Efendi'nin Sülüs-Nesih Hat Meşkleri, IRCICA, İstanbul, 2010
  2. ^ "Calligrapher Mehmed Şevki Efendi", Online:(translated from Turkish); Turkish Biographical Index, Walter de Gruyter, 2011, p. 678
  3. ^ Cotter, Holland (11 September 1998). "The Power of the Word In Darting Flames of Gold". The New York Times. p. 39. Retrieved 17 December 2011.
  4. ^ M. Uğur Derman, Letters in Gold: Ottoman Calligraphy from the Sakıp Sabancı Collection, N.Y., Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1998, p. 124
  5. ^ "Mehmed Şevkî Efendi" [Biographical Notes], Islam Encyclopedia Online Online:
  6. ^ M. Uğur Derman, Letters in Gold: Ottoman Calligraphy from the Sakıp Sabancı Collection, N.Y., Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1998, p. 20
  7. ^ Bloom, J. and Blair, S.S. (eds), Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art & Architecture, Volume 1, Oxford University Press, 2009, p. 475
  8. ^ M. Uğur Derman, Letters in Gold: Ottoman Calligraphy from the Sakıp Sabancı Collection, N.Y., Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1998, p. 124
  9. ^ "Mehmed Şevkî Efendi" [Biographical Notes], Islam Encyclopedia Online Online:; "Calligrapher Mehmed Şevki Efendi", Online: (translated from Turkish)
  10. ^ M. Uğur Derman, Letters in Gold: Ottoman Calligraphy from the Sakıp Sabancı Collection, N.Y., Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1998, p. 124
  11. ^ Mehmed Şevkî Efendi and Mohammed Tamimi (editor),The Thuluth & Naskh Mashqs, reprinted in 2010
  12. ^ Bloom, J. and Blair, S.S. (eds), Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art & Architecture, Volume 1, Oxford University Press, 2009, p. 475; Christies Auctions, Online: