Meifod

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Meifod
Meifod is located in Powys
Meifod
Meifod
Meifod shown within Powys
Population 1,322 (2011)[1]
OS grid reference SJ154133
Community
  • Meifod
Principal area
Ceremonial county
Country Wales
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town MEIFOD
Postcode district SY22 8
Dialling code 01938
Police Dyfed-Powys
Fire Mid and West Wales
Ambulance Welsh
EU Parliament Wales
UK Parliament
Welsh Assembly
List of places
UK
Wales
PowysCoordinates: 52°43′N 3°15′W / 52.71°N 3.25°W / 52.71; -3.25

Meifod, formerly also written Meivod (About this sound Welsh pronunciation ), is a small village and electoral ward 7 miles north-west of Welshpool in Powys, mid Wales, on the A495 road and located in the valley of the River Vyrnwy. The River Banwy has a confluence with the Vyrnwy approximately two miles to the west of the village.

History[edit]

Although the Mediolanum of the Antonine Itinerary has since been identified as Whitchurch in Shropshire, Meifod is sometimes identified as the Mediolanum among the Ordovices described in Ptolemy's Geography,[2][3] although others argue for Llanfyllin[2] or Caersws.[4]

Meifod is about a mile north-east of the royal residence of the Princes of Wales at Mathrafal, and it was an early Christian centre known at Caer Meguaidd or Meguaid;[5] It is associated with St Gwydafarch in the 6th century and St Tysilio in the 7th.[6] Tysilio's father was Brochwel Ysgithrog, a prince of Powys, who made Meifod his summer residence. The first Christian foundation was probably a clas and a monastery in the early medieval period.[7] A church built by Madog ap Maredudd, the last prince of the entire Kingdom of Powys, and dedicated to St Fair, was consecrated in 1156.[6] The same churchyard once contained three separate churches; Eglwys Gwydafarch, Eglwys Fair and Eglwys Tysilio.[8]

The churchyard is said to contain the royal tombs of Madog ap Maredudd (d. 1160) and his son Gruffydd Maelor (d. 1191), Prince of Powys Fadog.[6] There is also a stone slab in the church dated late-9th or early-10th century, although very weathered the decorations on it are still clear and include a large cross and a smaller cross in a circle, it is assumed that it once covered a tomb.[9][10]

Religion[edit]

At the village centre is the parish church of St Tysilio and St Mary, which occupies a very large site, the building includes material with a wide range of ages some dated to the 12th century.[6][11] In addition, in common with many Welsh villages, there are a number of Nonconformist chapels with the village and its catchment area.

Buildings[edit]

The village has one pub, the King's Head and a convenience store (with a post office). In 2006, local rugby union team C.O.B.R.A built a new rugby clubhouse and two pitches. The club house has two bars and a balcony. The village football team plays in the amateur division. The village also has a primary school, Ysgol Meifod (formerly Meifod County Primary (or CP) School) and a modern village hall located next door which provides facilities for a wide variety of clubs and societies.

Dyffryn Hall, a Georgian period manor house, is situated to the west of the village and was home to Clement Davies, the Montgomeryshire MP and leader of the post-war Liberal Party between 1945 and 1956.

Demographics[edit]

57% of the population of Meifod were born in England. However, this is not in itself evidence of any large-scale immigration from England; it may simply reflect the preference of local parents for using larger hospitals more conveniently situated in nearby Shropshire for giving birth. The United Kingdom Census 2001 revealed that some 38% of the population over 3 years old had some knowledge of the Welsh language with almost 20% able to speak, read and write in Welsh.[12] The Meifod valley hosted the National Eisteddfod in 2003 and 2015.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ward/Community population 2011". Retrieved 14 November 2015. 
  2. ^ a b Williams, Robert. "A History of the Parish of Llanfyllin" in Collections Historical & Archaeological Relating to Montgomeryshire, Vol. III, p. 59. J. Russell Smith (London), 1870.
  3. ^ Newman, John Henry & al. Lives of the English Saints: St. German, Bishop of Auxerre, Ch. X: "Britain in 429, A. D.", p. 92. James Toovey (London), 1844.
  4. ^ Roman Britain Organisation. "Mediomanum?" at Roman Britain. 2010.
  5. ^ Nennius; Mark the Anchorite; Gunn, Bill (1819). Historia Brittonum. J. and A. Arch. p. 105. 
  6. ^ a b c d "Parish Church of St Tysilio and St Mary, Meifod". British Listed Buildings. 
  7. ^ "Early Medieval Ecclesiastic and Burial Sites in Mid and North-East Wales: An Interim Report". CPAT. Retrieved 25 April 2015. PDF document, see page 5 
  8. ^ "Early Medieval Ecclesiastic and Burial Sites in Mid and North-East Wales: An Interim Report". CPAT. Retrieved 25 April 2015. PDF document, see page 11 
  9. ^ "Meifod Church (St Tysilio and St Mary), cross slab". CPAT. CPAT. Retrieved 25 April 2015. 
  10. ^ "Meifod - Ancient Cross in Wales in Powys". The Megalith Portal. Retrieved 25 April 2015. 
  11. ^ "ST TYSILIO AND ST MARY'S CHURCH, MEIFOD". Coflein. Retrieved 25 April 2015. 
  12. ^ 2001 Census Neighbourhood Statistics: Meifod

External links[edit]