Mel Robbins

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Mel Robbins
Born
Melanie Lee Schneeberger

(1968-10-06) October 6, 1968 (age 53)
NationalityAmerican
Alma materDartmouth College
Boston College Law School
Occupation
  • Author
  • district attorney
  • motivational speaker
  • talk show host
  • lawyer
Known forThe Mel Robbins Show, The View
Notable workThe 5-second rule

Melanie Robbins (née Schneeberger[1] on October 6, 1968) is an American lawyer, television host, author, and motivational speaker. Robbins is known for covering the George Zimmerman trial for CNN;[2] her TEDx talk, How to Stop Screwing Yourself Over;[3] and her books, The 5 Second Rule[4] and The High 5 Habit.[5]

Early life and education[edit]

Robbins was born in Kansas City, Missouri,[6] and grew up in North Muskegon, Michigan.[7] She attended Dartmouth College.[8] She received a J.D. degree from Boston College Law School in 1994.[9]

Career[edit]

Prior to joining CNN as a legal analyst, Robbins worked as a criminal defense attorney[10] and hosted Cox Media Group's The Mel Robbins Show,[11] A&E's Monster In-Laws,[12] and Fox's Someone's Gotta Go.

In 2011, Robbins published Stop Saying You're Fine: Discover a More Powerful You. She spoke at TEDx San Francisco about a psychological trick that she termed "the five second rule". Her talk, viewed more than 20 million times on YouTube[13] as of August 2019, launched her public speaking career.[citation needed]

On February 28, 2017, Robbins released her second book, The 5 Second Rule: Transform Your Life, Work, and Confidence with Everyday Courage. It was the top non-fiction book on Audible and sixth most-read book on Amazon in 2017.[14]

She collaborated with Audible to release the Audible Original programs Kick Ass with Mel Robbins in June 2018[15] and Take Control of Your Life in 2019.[16]

Her syndicated daytime talk show with Sony Pictures Television, The Mel Robbins Show, premiered on September 16, 2019.[17][18] On January 29, 2020, Sony announced that the show would be canceled following its first season due to low ratings.[19]

In 2014, Robbins received the Gracie Award for Outstanding Host–News/Non-fiction.[20]

Personal life[edit]

In 1996, Robbins married entrepreneur Christopher Robbins. They have three children.[21]

Selected works[edit]

  • Stop Saying You're Fine: Discover a More Powerful You. Harmony, 2011. Also published with the subtitle The No-BS Guide to Getting What You Want.
  • The 5 Second Rule: Transform Your Life, Work, and Confidence with Everyday Courage. Savio Republic, 2017.
  • The High 5 Habit: Take Control of Your Life with One Simple Habit. Hay House, Inc. 2021.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lois Smith Brady (March 12, 2006). "Mel Schneeberger and Christopher Robbins". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 2, 2015. Retrieved June 2, 2015.
  2. ^ Robbins, Mel. "Mel Robbins on day five in the Zimmerman trial: "It's kind of shocking, what the prosecution let the defense get away"". CNN. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved February 28, 2015.
  3. ^ TEDx Talks (June 11, 2011), How to stop screwing yourself over | Mel Robbins | TEDxSF, archived from the original on March 16, 2014, retrieved April 23, 2019
  4. ^ Franklin, MJ. "Amazon's top books of 2017 reflect the crazy-ass year we just lived through". Mashable. Archived from the original on January 31, 2018. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  5. ^ Chacon, Pablo; Parker, Lu (September 30, 2021). "Best-selling author Mel Robbins shares details on her new book 'The High 5 Habit'". KTLA. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved August 20, 2022.
  6. ^ "Big changes coming!". Facebook. Fox4 News Kansas City. August 20, 2019. Archived from the original on October 14, 2019. Retrieved August 20, 2019.
  7. ^ Rachel Baker (November 2007). "Mel Robbins Is Not the Bashful Type". Boston. Archived from the original on April 9, 2015. Retrieved June 2, 2015.
  8. ^ Salerno, Heather (January–February 2018). "5 Seconds To Launch". Dartmouth Alumni Magazine. Archived from the original on May 25, 2019. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  9. ^ Konecky, Chad; Wolkoff, Kate (2015). "It Takes Two". Boston College Law School Magazine. Archived from the original on May 25, 2019. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  10. ^ "About — Mel Robbins". Mel Robbins. Archived from the original on October 31, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2016.
  11. ^ Porter, Rick (January 29, 2020). "'Mel Robbins Show' Ending After One Season in Syndication". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on August 20, 2022. Retrieved August 20, 2022.
  12. ^ Genzlinger, Neil (October 23, 2011). "Family Dysfunctions and the Duct Tape Détente". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on June 21, 2022. Retrieved August 20, 2022.
  13. ^ How to stop screwing yourself over | Mel Robbins | TEDxSF on YouTube. Published June 11, 2011.
  14. ^ "This Year in Books by Amazon Charts". Amazon.com. Archived from the original on December 10, 2020. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  15. ^ Kick Ass with Mel Robbins. Archived from the original on April 23, 2019. Retrieved April 23, 2019.
  16. ^ Take Control of Your Life. Archived from the original on April 23, 2019. Retrieved April 23, 2019.
  17. ^ "Mel Robbins Syndicated Daytime Talk Show Cleared In 90% Of U.S. For September Launch". Deadline Hollywood. April 24, 2019. Archived from the original on April 25, 2019. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  18. ^ Albiniak, Paige (September 16, 2019). "SPT Debuts 'The Mel Robbins Show'". Broadcasting & Cable. Archived from the original on September 18, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  19. ^ "'Mel Robbins Show' Ending After One Season in Syndication". The Hollywood Reporter. January 29, 2020. Archived from the original on January 30, 2020. Retrieved February 3, 2020.
  20. ^ "2014 Gracie Awards Winners". Allwomenmedia.org. Archived from the original on February 26, 2015. Retrieved February 28, 2015.
  21. ^ Smith Brady, Lois (March 12, 2006). "Mel Schneeberger and Christopher Robbins". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 18, 2022. Retrieved January 16, 2022.

External links[edit]