Melissa Lucashenko

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Melissa Lucashenko
Born1967 (age 51–52)
Brisbane, Australia
OccupationWriter
NationalityAustralian
GenreAdult literary fiction, literary non-fiction and novels for teenagers
Website
www.melissa-lucashenko.com

Melissa Lucashenko is an Australian writer of adult literary fiction and literary non-fiction, who has also written novels for teenagers.

In 2013 at The Walkley Awards, she won the 'Feature Writing Long (over 4000 words) Award' for her piece Sinking below sight: Down and out in Brisbane and Logan.

Biography[edit]

Melissa Lucashenko was born in 1967 in Brisbane, Australia. Her heritage is European and Murri Aboriginal. She is a graduate of Griffith University (1990), with an honours degree in public policy.[1][2]

Lucashenko's first work to be published was Steam Pigs (1997), which won the Dobbie Prize for Australian women's fiction. It was also a short-list nominee for the NSW Premier's Award and the Commonwealth Writers' Prize.[2] In 1998 she released the novel Killing Darcy which won the Aurora Prize of the Royal Blind Society, was a finalist for the 1998 Aurealis Award for best young-adult novel and named on the 1998 James Tiptree Jr Memorial Award long list.[3][4] In 1999 her third book, Hard Yards was released, and in 2002 her fourth novel Too Flash was published. Hard Yards was a finalist in the 2001 Courier-Mail Book of the Year and the NSW Premier's Award. She is also an accomplished essayist. Lucashenko's fifth novel, Mullumbimby, won the prestigious Deloitte Fiction Book Award in 2013.[2]

In March 2014 The Moth Radio Hour aired a recording of Lucashenko recounting the story of moving with her husband and daughter back to the Aboriginal lands in New South Wales (where her great-grandmother grew up), and subsequent divorce from her husband and mental illness of her daughter.[5]

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

  • Steam pigs, University of Queensland Press (1997) ISBN 978-0-70-222935-0
  • Killing Darcy, University of Queensland Press (1998) ISBN 978-0-70-223041-7
  • Hard Yards, University of Queensland Press (1999) ISBN 978-0-70-223080-6
  • Too Flash (2002) ISBN 978-1-86-465048-8
  • Uptown Girl, University of Queensland Press (2002) ISBN 978-0-70-223334-0
  • Mullumbimby, University of Queensland Press, (2013) ISBN 978-0-70-223919-9
  • Too Much Lip, University of Queensland Press, (2018) ISBN 978-0-70-225996-8

Essays[edit]

  • Lucashenko, Melissa (June 2014). "Aborigines in the Australian literary tradition". Australian Author. 46 (1): 23–27.[6]
  • Globalisation, Kimberley Style in Our Global Face edition 6
  • How Green is My Valley? in Hot Air edition 12
  • Not Quite White in the Head
  • On the Same Page, right? in Stories for Today edition 26
  • Our Bodies in Making Perfect Bodies edition 4
  • The Silent Majority in Stories for Today edition 26
  • Whiteness
  • Who Let the Dogs Out?

Contributed chapter[edit]

  • "History's footnote, or, a Wolvi incident", pp. 63–69, in: Destroying the joint, edited by Jane Caro, Read How You Want (2015, ISBN 9781459687295).

Nominations and awards[edit]

Aurealis Awards

Aurora Prize of the Royal Blind Society

  • 1998: Won: Killing Darcy

Commonwealth Writers' Prize

  • 1997: Nomination: Steam Pigs

Courier-Mail Book of the Year

    • 2001: Nomination: Hard Yards

Nita Kibble Literary Award

James Tiptree Jr Memorial Award

  • 1998: Long list: Killing Darcy

NSW Premier's Award

  • 1997: Steam Pigs
  • 1999: Hard Yards

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Melissa Lucashenko". Griffith Review. Archived from the original on 2009-10-23. Retrieved 2010-04-25.
  2. ^ a b c "Home". Melissa Lucashenko. Archived from the original on 2011-07-06. Retrieved 2010-04-25.
  3. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 1999 Aurealis Awards". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 2 April 2010. Retrieved 2010-04-25.
  4. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 1999 James Tiptree Jr Memorial Award". Locus Online. Archived from the original on 14 January 2010. Retrieved 2010-04-25.
  5. ^ "The Moth Radio Hour: My Grandmother's Country". The Moth. Retrieved 2014-03-26.
  6. ^ An edited version of her Colin Simpson Memorial Lecture, October 2013.

External links[edit]