Melon soup

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A melon soup with skewers of melon balls, Mozzarella balls and meat
A cold melon soup with garnishes

Melon soup is a soup prepared with melon as a primary ingredient.[1] Melons such as bitter melon, cantaloupe, crenshaw melon, honeydew (casaba melon) and winter melon may be used,[1][2][3] among others. Some melon soups are prepared with whole pieces of melon, and others use puréed melon.[2] Some are served hot, while others are served chilled.[4] Some cold varieties are prepared without any cooking involved.[5] Several styles and varieties of melon soups exist, including bitter melon soup, cantaloupe soup and winter melon soup,[6][7][8] among others. The origin of some melon soup recipes may cross international boundaries.[clarification needed]

Varieties[edit]

Bitter melon soup[edit]

Bitter melon soup is prepared using bitter melon as a primary ingredient, and is a part of Chinese cuisine.[6] In Cantonese, bitter melon is referred to as "the cooling melon," using the term leung gwa.[6] In the region of China's Pearl River Delta, bitter melon soup is prepared from fresh melons during the summer, and also from dried bitter melon powder during other seasons.[6] It may be prepared including fish such as bass or carp.[6]

Cantaloupe soup[edit]

Cantaloupe soup is prepared with cantaloupe as a primary ingredient. It may be prepared in puréed form and is typically served chilled.[7][9] It is sometimes referred to as muskmelon soup. Cantaloupe soup may be served as a first course or starter dish prior to a main course.[7][9] The use of well-ripened cantaloupe can create an optimal texture and enhance the sweet flavor of the soup.[9] Additional ingredients can include lime juice, lemon juice, apple juice, orange juice, salt, pepper, herbs such as mint or basil, cayenne pepper and balsamic vinegar.[7][9][10] Spicy versions may be prepared using chili peppers.[11] A cantaloupe soup recipe using one large cantaloupe melon, one-half cup orange juice and one-quarter cup of honey has 147 calories per one-cup serving.[10]

Watermelon soup[edit]

Watermelon soup is prepared with watermelon as a primary ingredient, and may be served chilled.[12] The seeds of the watermelon may be removed, or seedless watermelon may be used, and additional ingredients can include additional fruits, ginger, chili pepper and sugar.[12][13][14]

Winter melon soup[edit]

Winter melon soup is prepared with winter melon as a primary ingredient[8][15] and is a part of Chinese cuisine[16] and the cuisine of Hong Kong.[17][18] It is served often at Chinese banquets.[19] Winter melon soup may have a slightly sweet flavor.[15] Some recipes may use several ingredients in addition to winter melon,[8] which may include ham, carrot, mushrooms[16] and chicken.[20] Winter melon soup may be served hot, yet has been described as having a cooling effect upon the body when consumed.[18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sackett, Lou; Pestka, Jaclyn; Gisslen, Wayne (2010). Professional Garde Manger: A Comprehensive Guide to Cold Food Preparation. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. p. 302. ISBN 978-0-470-17996-3.
  2. ^ a b Larsen, L.J. (2009). Knack Soup Classics: Chowders, Gumbos, Bisques, Broths, Stocks, and Other Delicious Soups. Globe Pequot Press. p. 227. ISBN 978-0-7627-6154-8.
  3. ^ Woods, David (2000). Millennium Fruit Soup Cookbook. San Jose California: AuthorHouse, Writers Club Press. p. 158. ISBN 978-0-595-00182-8.
  4. ^ Piotrowski, Joyce Dodson. "Magnificent Melons". Vegetarian Times. p. 48. Retrieved 12 October 2015.
  5. ^ Nowlan, S. (2008). Delicious DASH Flavours: The Proven, Drug Free, Doctor Recommended Approach to Reducing High Blood Pressure. Flavours Cookbook. Formac Publishing Company Limited. p. 50. ISBN 978-0-88780-766-4.
  6. ^ a b c d e Chen, Teresa M.; Yan, M. (2009). A Tradition of Soup: Flavors from China's Pearl River Delta. Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books. p. 137. ISBN 978-1-55643-765-6.
  7. ^ a b c d Fabricant, Florence (August 18, 2015). "Cold Cantaloupe Soup Recipe". The New York Times. Retrieved October 12, 2015.
  8. ^ a b c Chen, Teresa M.; Yan, M. (2009). A Tradition of Soup: Flavors from China's Pearl River Delta. Delta. Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books. pp. 237–238. ISBN 978-1-55643-765-6.
  9. ^ a b c d The Denver Post (July 29, 2015). "Recipe: Chilled Cantaloupe Soup". The Denver Post. Retrieved October 12, 2015.
  10. ^ a b Pierce, Charles (June 13, 2013). "Cantaloupe Soup with Mint". Health. Retrieved October 12, 2015.
  11. ^ Fleischaker, Emily (August 5, 2013). "How To Make Light & Spicy Cantaloupe Soup". BuzzFeed. Retrieved 12 October 2015.
  12. ^ a b Wright, C.A. (2011). The Best Soups in the World. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 438. ISBN 978-0-544-17779-6.
  13. ^ D’Amato, Sandy (September 12, 2014). "When life gives you watermelons, make watermelon soup". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved October 13, 2015.
  14. ^ Hix, Mark (July 20, 2013). "Fragrant watermelon soup". The Independent. Retrieved October 13, 2015.
  15. ^ a b Lau, D.K. (2013). Sharkless Shark Fin Soup. Booktango. p. PT 69. ISBN 978-1-4689-2736-8.
  16. ^ a b Yan, Martin (2011). Chinese Cooking For Dummies. Foster City, California: John Wiley & Sons. pp. 223–225. ISBN 978-1-118-06929-5.
  17. ^ Turiano, John Bruno (November 20, 2014). "Bao's New Menu Of Chinese Staples, Both Native And American". Westchester Magazine. Retrieved October 12, 2015.
  18. ^ a b Duane, Daniel (December 19, 2014). "A Culinary Adventure in Hong Kong". Men's Journal. Retrieved October 12, 2015.
  19. ^ Parkinson, Rhonda. "Winter Melon Soup". About.com. Retrieved 12 October 2015.
  20. ^ Cooray, Kusuma (2001). Burst of Flavor: The Fine Art of Cooking With Spices. Latitude 20 Books. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-8248-2416-7.