Melvin Steinberg

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Melvin A. Steinberg
5th Lieutenant Governor of Maryland
In office
January 21, 1987 – January 18, 1995
Governor William Donald Schaefer
Preceded by J. Joseph Curran, Jr.
Succeeded by Kathleen Kennedy Townsend
President of the Maryland State Senate
In office
January 1983 – 1987
Preceded by James Clark, Jr.
Succeeded by Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr.
Member of the Maryland Senate
In office
1967–1987
Personal details
Born (1933-10-04) October 4, 1933 (age 84)
Political party Democratic
Profession Attorney at law

Melvin A. Steinberg (born October 4, 1933) is an American politician who served as the fifth Lieutenant Governor of Maryland from 1987 to 1995[1] under Governor William Donald Schaefer. He was also President of the Maryland State Senate from January 1983 to 1987, and a member of the State Senate from 1967 until his election to the position of Lieutenant Governor.[1] Steinberg graduated from the University of Baltimore with an A.A. degree in 1952 and with a J.D. degree in 1955.[1]

The relationship between Steinberg and Schaefer was strained, with each publicly criticising the other[2][3][4][5] and extensive coverage being devoted to their personal relationship.[6][7] Despite their differences, they worked together for eight years (1987–1995), winning two elections in the process. Steinberg ran for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination in 1994[8] launching his campaign pledging a war on crime,[9] but was defeated by Parris Glendening, who went on to become governor. Steinberg then took up a career in lobbying.[10] In 1998, he drew criticism for supporting the Republican candidate for Governor, Ellen Sauerbrey, rather than endorsing Glendening in his bid for re-election; Sauerbrey was a critic of abortion and of gun control, positions opposite those held by Steinberg.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Maryland Lieutenant Governor MELVIN A. STEINBERG". Maryland State Archives (msa.md.gov). January 31, 2000. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  2. ^ Birch, D.; Banisky, S. (April 27, 1991). "Steinberg staff pared to 3 Schaefer blames budget". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  3. ^ Jensen, P. (March 22, 1991). "Schaefer addresses rift with Steinberg over airwaves". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  4. ^ Frece, J. W. (March 16, 1991). "Schaefer memo appears aimed against Steinberg". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  5. ^ Smith, C. F. (May 15, 1991). "Governor signals compromise with Steinberg, Assembly". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  6. ^ Thompson, W. (September 28, 1990). "Annual Schaefer-Steinberg chill gets chillier". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  7. ^ Olesker, M. (February 9, 1992). "Schaefer and Steinberg: no fire, just ice". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  8. ^ Waldron, T. (September 12, 1994). "Steinberg appeals for defections from two rival camps". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  9. ^ Timberg, R. (January 11, 1994). "Steinberg fires anti-crime salvo". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  10. ^ Frece, J. W. (December 6, 1994). "Steinberg to become a lobbyist". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  11. ^ Waldron, T. W. (September 18, 1998). "Democratic warhorse defects Steinberg endorses GOP's Sauerbrey in slap at Glendening". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
Political offices
Preceded by
James Clark, Jr.
President of the Maryland State Senate
1983–1987
Succeeded by
Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr.
Preceded by
J. Joseph Curran, Jr.
Lieutenant Governor of Maryland
1987–1995
Succeeded by
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend