Men's long jump world record progression

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The men's long jump world record progression lists records ratified by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) starting in 1912. The inaugural record was the 7.61 m (24 ft 11+12 in) performance by Peter O'Connor in 1901.[1]

Record progression[edit]

Graphic evolution of men's long jump world record progression.
Men's long jump world record progression (all altitudes).
Mark Wind Athlete Place Date
  7.61 m (24 ft 11+12 in)   Peter O'Connor (IRE)  Dublin, Ireland  5 August 1901[1]
  7.69 m (25 ft 2+34 in)   Edward Gourdin (USA)  Cambridge, United States  23 July 1921[1]
  7.76 m (25 ft 5+12 in)   Robert LeGendre (USA)  Paris, France  7 July 1924[1]
  7.89 m (25 ft 10+12 in)   DeHart Hubbard (USA)  Chicago, United States  13 June 1925[1]
  7.90 m (25 ft 11 in)   Edward Hamm (USA)  Cambridge, United States  7 July 1928[1]
  7.93 m (26 ft 0 in) 0.0   Sylvio Cator (HAI)  Paris, France  9 September 1928[1]
  7.98 m (26 ft 2 in) 0.5   Chuhei Nambu (JPN)  Tokyo, Japan  27 October 1931[1]
  8.13 m (26 ft 8 in) 1.5   Jesse Owens (USA)  Ann Arbor, United States  25 May 1935[1]
  8.21 m (26 ft 11 in) 0.0   Ralph Boston (USA)  Walnut, United States  12 August 1960[1]
  8.24 m (27 ft 14 in) 1.8   Ralph Boston (USA)  Modesto, United States  27 May 1961[1]
  8.28 m (27 ft 1+34 in) 1.2   Ralph Boston (USA)  Moscow, Soviet Union  16 July 1961[1]
  8.31 m (27 ft 3 in) A −0.1   Igor Ter-Ovanesyan (URS)  Yerevan, Soviet Union  10 June 1962[1]
  8.33 m (27 ft 3+34 in)[2]   Phil Shinnick (USA)  Modesto, United States  25 May 1963[3]
  8.31 m (27 ft 3 in) 0.0   Ralph Boston (USA)  Kingston, Jamaica  15 August 1964[note 1][4]
  8.34 m (27 ft 4+14 in) 1.0   Ralph Boston (USA)  Los Angeles, United States  12 September 1964[1]
  8.35 m (27 ft 4+12 in)[5] 0.0   Ralph Boston (USA)  Modesto, United States  29 May 1965[1][6]
  8.35 m (27 ft 4+12 in) A 0.0   Igor Ter-Ovanesyan (URS)  Mexico City, Mexico  19 October 1967[1]
  8.90 m (29 ft 2+14 in) A 2.0   Bob Beamon (USA)  Mexico City, Mexico  18 October 1968[1]
  8.95 m (29 ft 4+14 in) 0.3   Mike Powell (USA)  Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan  30 August 1991[1]

Low altitude record progression 1965–1991[edit]

The IAAF considers marks set at high altitude as acceptable for record consideration. However, high altitude can significantly assist long jump performances. At the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, Bob Beamon broke the existing record by a margin of 55 cm (21+12 in), and his world record of 8.90 m (29 ft 2+14 in) stood until Mike Powell jumped 8.95 m (29 ft 4+14 in) in 1991. However, Beamon's jump was set at an altitude of 2,292 m (7,520 ft), with a maximum allowable wind, factors which assisted his performance.[7]

This list contains the progression of long jump marks set at low altitude starting with the mark that stood at Beamon's record in 1968 to Powell's 1991 world record.

Mark Wind Athlete Place Date
  8.35 m (27 ft 4+12 in)[5] 0.0   Ralph Boston (USA)  Modesto, United States  29 May 1965[1][6]
  8.35 m (27 ft 4+12 in) 0.8   Josef Schwarz (FRG)  Stuttgart, West Germany  15 July 1970[8]
  8.45 m (27 ft 8+12 in) 2.0   Nenad Stekić (YUG)  Montreal, Canada  25 July 1975[8]
  8.52 m (27 ft 11+14 in) 0.0   Larry Myricks (USA)  Montreal, Canada  26 August 1979[8]
  8.54 m (28 ft 0 in) 0.9   Lutz Dombrowski (GDR)  Moscow, Soviet Union  28 July 1980[8]
  8.62 m (28 ft 3+14 in) 0.8   Carl Lewis (USA)  Sacramento, United States  20 June 1981[8]
  8.76 m (28 ft 8+34 in) 1.0   Carl Lewis (USA)  Indianapolis, United States  24 July 1982[8]
  8.79 m (28 ft 10 in) 1.9   Carl Lewis (USA)  Indianapolis, United States  19 June 1983[8]
  8.95 m (29 ft 4+14 in) 0.3   Mike Powell (USA)  Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan  30 August 1991[1]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Phil Shinnick's 8.33m from 1963 was recognized as a World Record in 2021 and added to the progression list, "with no deletion of later marks." Hence Boston's 8.31 from 1964 remains on the list.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t "12th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Berlin 2009" (PDF). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2009. pp. Pages 546, 556. Archived from the original (pdf) on 29 June 2011. Retrieved 5 August 2019.
  2. ^ Note: Shinnick jumped imperial 27′ 4″
  3. ^ "US long jumper Shinnick retroactively recognised as world record-breaker | World Athletics". www.worldathletics.org. Retrieved 28 June 2021.
  4. ^ || "World Athletics Championships Oregon22: Statistics Handbook" (PDF). Monte Carlo: World Athletics Communications Department. 2022. pp. Page 733. Retrieved August 1, 2022.
  5. ^ a b Note: Boston jumped imperial 27′ 5″
  6. ^ a b "BOSTON LEAPS 27-5; Breaks Own Record -- Connolly Hits 233-2 in Hammer Throw". The New York Times. 30 May 1960. Retrieved 1 October 2021.
  7. ^ Ward-Smith, A. J. (1986). "Altitude and wind effects on long jump performance with particular reference to the world record established by Bob Beamon". Journal of Sports Sciences. 4 (2): 89–99. doi:10.1080/02640418608732104. PMID 3586109.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g "All-time men's best long jump". alltime-athletics.com. 10 September 2021. Retrieved 16 September 2021.