Meraud Guinness

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Meraud Guevara
Photo of Meraud Guinness.jpg
Born
Meraud Michael Guinness

(1904-06-24)June 24, 1904
London, United Kingdom
DiedMay 6, 1993(1993-05-06) (aged 88)
Paris, France
NationalityBritish
EducationSlade School of Art, Académie Julian, and Académie de la Grande Chaumière
Known forPainting, Writing
Spouse(s)
Álvaro Guevara (m. 1929)

Meraud Guinness also known as Meraud Guevara (24 June 1904 – 6 May 1993) was a painter, author and poet, living most of her life in France with her husband, Álvaro Guevara.

Life[edit]

Meraud, Tanis, & Loel Guinness

She was born Meraud Michael Guinness in London on 24 June 1904 a member of the famous and wealthy Guinness family.

Aged 19 she began studies at Slade School of Art in London and studied under Henry Tonks.[1] From 1926 to 1927 she studied in New York under the sculptor Alexander Archipenko. During her time in New York she also wrote for Vogue magazine. She next moved to Paris, France and studied at both the Académie Julian and Académie de la Grande Chaumière under Francis Picabia and Pierre Tal-Coat.

Although earlier connected romantically to Christopher Wood, also sitting for him, she ultimately married Chilean painter Álvaro Guevara in 1929 and spent most of her life in the south of France, in Aix-en-Provence near him, but not with him, their marriage crumbling after the birth of their daughter in 1930.

In 1943, Guinness' work was included in Peggy Guggenheim's show Exhibition by 31 Women at the Art of This Century gallery in New York.[2]

She died in Paris on 6 May 1993.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Meraud Guevara, the 31 Women number twelve – her birthday is 24 June". Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  2. ^ Butler, Cornelia H.; Schwartz, Alexandra (2010). Modern Women: Women Artists at The Museum of Modern Art. New York: Museum of Modern Art. p. 45. ISBN 9780870707711.
  3. ^ Tate. "Meraud Guevara (1904-1993) - Tate". Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  • Tate Gallery
  • Meraud Guinness Guevara, ma Mère by Alladine Guevara (2007, Rocher)

External links[edit]