Mercer County, Pennsylvania

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Mercer County, Pennsylvania
Mercer County Courthouse Pennsylvania 2010.jpg
Mercer County Courthouse (1909)
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Mercer County
Location in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania
Map of the United States highlighting Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania's location in the U.S.
Founded November 7, 1803
Seat Mercer
Largest city Hermitage
Area
 • Total 683 sq mi (1,769 km2)
 • Land 673 sq mi (1,743 km2)
 • Water 10 sq mi (26 km2), 1.5%
Population (est.)
 • (2015) 114,234
 • Density 170/sq mi (66/km²)
Congressional district 3rd
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.mcc.co.mercer.pa.us

Mercer County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 116,638.[1] Its county seat is Mercer,[2] and its largest city is Hermitage. The county was created in 1800 and later organized in 1803.[3]

Mercer County is included in the Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 683 square miles (1,770 km2), of which 673 square miles (1,740 km2) is land and 10 square miles (26 km2) (1.5%) is water.[4]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1800 3,228
1810 8,277 156.4%
1820 11,681 41.1%
1830 19,729 68.9%
1840 32,873 66.6%
1850 33,172 0.9%
1860 36,856 11.1%
1870 49,977 35.6%
1880 56,161 12.4%
1890 55,744 −0.7%
1900 57,387 2.9%
1910 77,699 35.4%
1920 93,788 20.7%
1930 99,246 5.8%
1940 101,039 1.8%
1950 111,954 10.8%
1960 127,519 13.9%
1970 127,175 −0.3%
1980 128,299 0.9%
1990 121,003 −5.7%
2000 120,307 −0.6%
2010 116,638 −3.0%
Est. 2015 114,234 [5] −2.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 120,293 people, 46,712 households, and 32,371 families residing in the county. The population density was 179 people per square mile (69/km²). There were 49,859 housing units at an average density of 74 per square mile (29/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 93.13% White, 5.25% Black or African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.40% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. 0.67% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 24.5% were of German, 12.0% Italian, 10.5% Irish, 9.3% English and 6.8% American ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 46,712 households out of which 29.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.80% were married couples living together, 10.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.70% were non-families. 27.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.40% under the age of 18, 8.90% from 18 to 24, 26.10% from 25 to 44, 23.50% from 45 to 64, and 18.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 94.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.80 males.

Government and politics[edit]

As of November 2008, there are 80,917 registered voters in Mercer County.[11]

Political bellwether[edit]

Mercer County was previously considered a political bellwether for the state of Pennsylvania since its demographics, urban/rural ratio, and party affiliation once closely mirrored the state as a whole. In 2000 Al Gore carried it against George W. Bush. This trend failed to hold true during 2004 Presidential election and 2008 Presidential election, in which Mercer County voted more conservatively than the rest of the state. In 2004 George W. Bush won Mercer County with 51% of the vote. That year John Kerry won the state as a whole with 51% of the popular vote. In 2008 John McCain won Mercer County by fewer than 200 votes, as he and Barack Obama each received roughly 49% of the popular vote. Barack Obama won the state of Pennsylvania as a whole with 55% of the popular vote. Each of the three statewide office winners also carried Mercer in 2008. In 2016 Donald J. Trump won Mercer County by 12,403 votes. Donald J. Trump won the state of Pennsylvania. Each of the three statewide office republican candidates each carried Mercer in 2016.

County Commissioners[edit]

Commissioner Party Title
Matthew McConnell Republican Chairmen
Scott Boyd Republican Vice Chairmen
Timothy McGonigle Democrat

Secretary

Other County Officials[edit]

Office Official Party
President Judge of Court of Common Pleas Thomas R. Dobson N/A
Judge of Court of Common Pleas Daniel P. Wallace N/A
Judge of Court of Common Pleas Christopher J. St. John N/A
Judge of Court of Common Pleas Robert G. Yeatts N/A
Clerk of Courts/Register of Wills Kathleen M. Kloos Democrat
District Attorney Miles Karson Republican
Coroner John A. Libonati Republican
Sheriff Gary Hartman Democrat
Treasurer Virginia Richardson Republican
Prothonotary Ruth Bice Democrat
Recorder of Deeds Dee Dee Zickar Republican

State Senate[edit]

District Senator Party
50 Michele Brooks Republican

State House of Representatives[edit]

District Representative Party
8 Tedd Nesbit Republican
7 Mark Longietti Democrat
17 Parke Wentling Republican

United States House of Representatives[edit]

District Representative Party
3 Mike Kelly Republican

United States Senate[edit]

Senator Party
Pat Toomey Republican
Bob Casey Democrat

Education[edit]

Higher education[edit]

Career-based education[edit]

Public school districts[edit]

Map of Mercer County, Pennsylvania Public School Districts

Charter schools[edit]

  • Keystone Education Center Charter School,[12] Greenville, PA. 256 pupils grades 7-12 Report Card 2010.[13]

Recreation[edit]

There is one Pennsylvania state park in Mercer County. Maurice K. Goddard State Park, named for Maurice K. Goddard, former Secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, is just off exit 130 of Interstate 79 on Pennsylvania Route 358 near Stoneboro.

The Wendell August Forge, the last remaining working forge in the state, was open to the public for tours, but it burned down on March 6, 2010.[14] It has since reopened in new facilities.

Mercer County Court House built in 1909.

Communities[edit]

Map of Mercer County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Cities and Boroughs (red) and Townships (white).

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and, in one case, towns. The following cities, boroughs and townships are located in Mercer County:

Cities[edit]

Boroughs[edit]

Townships[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Former community[edit]

  • Hickory Township-became the Municipality of Hermitage in 1976, and then the City of Hermitage in 1984.[15]

Population ranking[edit]

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Mercer County.[16]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census)
1 Hermitage City 16,220
2 Sharon City 14,038
3 Grove City Borough 8,322
4 Greenville Borough 5,919
5 Farrell City 5,111
6 Sharpsville Borough 4,415
7 Reynolds Heights CDP 2,061
8 Mercer Borough 2,002
9 Stoneboro Borough 1,051
10 Lake Latonka CDP 1,012
11 West Middlesex Borough 863
12 Sandy Lake Borough 659
13 Clark Borough 640
14 Wheatland Borough 632
15 Jamestown Borough 617
16 Fredonia Borough 502
17 Jackson Center Borough 224
18 New Lebanon Borough 188
19 Sheakleyville Borough 142

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 20, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Pennsylvania: Individual County Chronologies". Pennsylvania Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved March 13, 2015. 
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 9, 2015. 
  5. ^ "County Totals Dataset: Population, Population Change and Estimated Components of Population Change: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 11, 2015. Retrieved March 9, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 9, 2015. 
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 24, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 9, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 9, 2015. 
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  11. ^ Running for Office. Dos.state.pa.us. Retrieved on 2013-07-23.
  12. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2011). "Charter Schools". 
  13. ^ [1][dead link]
  14. ^ "Landmark metal forge burns in Mercer County." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Online. March 06, 2010.
  15. ^ http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~pamercer/PA/PL/ts/Hickory/hickory.htm
  16. ^ http://www.census.gov/2010census/

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°19′N 80°15′W / 41.31°N 80.25°W / 41.31; -80.25