Mercy Health (Ohio and Kentucky)

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Mercy Health
TypeNon-profit
IndustryHealth care
HeadquartersCincinnati, Ohio, United States[1]
ParentBon Secours Mercy Health Edit this on Wikidata
Websitewww.mercy.com

Mercy Health,[2] formerly Catholic Health Partners, is a Catholic health care system with locations in Ohio and Kentucky.[3][4][5] Cincinnati-based Mercy Health operates more than 250 healthcare organizations in Ohio and Kentucky. Mercy Health is the largest health system in Ohio and the state's fourth-largest employer.[6]

On September 1, 2018 Mercy Health and Bon Secours Health System USA combined to become Bon Secours Mercy Health.[7] Bon Secours Mercy Health headquarters are co-located with Mercy Heath in Cincinnati, Ohio.

History[edit]

The Religious Sisters of Mercy (R.S.M.) were founded in 1831 in Dublin, Ireland, by Catherine McAuley. The sisters arrived in the United States in 1843. Eventually thirty-nine separate Sisters of Mercy congregations across the United States and Latin America developed from that first convent in Pittsburgh. The Sisters of Mercy established hospitals in Hamilton, Ohio in 1892 and in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, in 1898.

The Sisters of Charity of Montreal[edit]

In 1855 Toledo, Ohio was in the midst of a cholera and malaria epidemic. Father Augustine Campion, pastor of St. Francis de Sales Church, asked the Sisters of Charity of Montreal for assistance. They established St. Vincent Hospital. In 1983 the Sisters of Charity of Montreal established Covenant Health Systems to direct, support and conduct their health care, elder care and social service systems throughout the United States.[8] St. Vincent's Medical Center in Toledo joined Catholic Health Partners, while Covenant Health Systems retained management of the facilities in New England.

Sisters of the Holy Humility of Mary[edit]

The sisters entered health care in 1879 when St. Joseph's Infirmary was built, the first Catholic hospital in the Mahoning Valley, which functioned until 1910 when the sisters were given charge of St. Elizabeth Hospital in Youngstown, Ohio.[9] Two more Ohio hospitals came under the direction of the sisters - St. Joseph Health Center in Warren in 1924 and St. Elizabeth in Boardman. By 2011, Humility of Mary Health Partners was formed to oversee the administration and management of St. Elizabeth Hospital and St. Joseph Health Center and several other area health-care services.[10] By 2014, the hospitals were run by Catholic Health Partners.[11]

Name changes[edit]

Incorporated in 1986 as Mercy Health Care Systems, in 1997 the name was changed to Catholic Healthcare Partners to reflect the multiple religious communities that sponsored it. It was later shortened to Catholic Health Partners to reflect its growing emphasis on preventative care and overall wellness.[12] It became Mercy Health in 2014.[3]

Sponsors[edit]

These Catholic organizations co-sponsor Mercy Health:[13] the Sisters of Mercy, South Central Community; the Sisters of Mercy, Mid-Atlantic Community; the Sisters of Humility of Mary; and the Sisters of Charity of Montreal.

Hospitals[edit]

Mercy Health serves seven markets: Cincinnati, Toledo, Youngstown, Lima, Lorain and Springfield in Ohio and Paducah and Irvine in Kentucky.[14][6]

Cincinnati, Ohio[edit]

In the Cincinnati area, there are five hospitals:[15]

And four additional 24-hour standalone emergency rooms:[16]

  • Mercy Health Harrison Medical Center
  • Mercy Health Mt. Orab Medical Center
  • Mercy Health Queen City Medical Center
  • Mercy Health Rookwood Medical Center

Lima, Ohio[edit]

One hospital in Allen County:[17]

One additional 24-hour standalone emergency room:[18]

  • Mercy Health Putnam County Emergency Services

Lorain County, Ohio[edit]

  • Mercy Health Allen Hospital[19]
  • Mercy Health Lorain Hospital

Springfield, Ohio[edit]

  • Mercy Health Urbana Hospital
  • Mercy Health Springfield Regional Medical Center[20]

One additional 24-hour standalone emergency room:[21]

  • Mercy Health Dayton Springfield Emergency Center

Toledo, Ohio[edit]

Eight hospitals in Toledo and the Northwest Ohio area:[22]

And one additional 24-hour standalone emergency room:[23]

  • Mercy Health Sylvania Medical Center

Youngstown, Ohio[edit]

Three hospitals in the Mahoning Valley area:[24]

  • Mercy Health St. Elizabeth Boardman Hospital
  • Mercy Health St. Elizabeth Youngstown Hospital
  • Mercy Health St. Joseph Warren Hospital

One additional 24-hour standalone emergency room:[25]

  • Mercy Health Austintown Medical Center

Irvine, Kentucky[edit]

  • Mercy Health Marcum and Wallace Hospital[26]

Paducah, Kentucky[edit]

  • Mercy Health Lourdes Hospital[27]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mercy hospitals' parent firm changes name". Toledo Blade. Retrieved November 29, 2015.
  2. ^ Lisa Bernard-Kuhn. "Catholic Health Partners, Ohio's largest health system, changing its name to Mercy Health". WCPO. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved November 29, 2015.
  3. ^ a b Smith, Carrie Blackmore (July 24, 2014). "Ohio's largest health firm unifies under Mercy name". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. Retrieved February 20, 2016.
  4. ^ "Say goodbye to the name Catholic Health Partners". Biz Journals. July 24, 2014. Retrieved February 20, 2016.
  5. ^ Bernard-Kuhn, Lisa (July 24, 2014). "Catholic Health Partners, Ohio's largest health system, changing its name to Mercy Health". WCPO-TV. E. W. Scripps Company. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved February 20, 2016.
  6. ^ a b "Mercy Health". Catholic Health Partners. Retrieved February 20, 2016.
  7. ^ "Who We Are". Bon Secours Mercy Health. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  8. ^ "Covenant Health".
  9. ^ "Humility of Mary Sisters", Encyclopedia of Cleveland History, Case Western University
  10. ^ Humility of Mary Health Partners
  11. ^ Zlatos, Bill. "Sisters of the Humility of Mary in Lawrence County celebrate 150th anniversary", Tribune-Review, July 20, 2014
  12. ^ Poturalski, Hannah. "Catholic Health Partners changes name to Mercy Health", Akron Beacon Journal, July 25, 2014
  13. ^ "Mercy Health". Catholic Health Partners. Archived from the original on February 15, 2016. Retrieved February 20, 2016.
  14. ^ Smith, Carrie Blackmore (July 24, 2014). "Ohio's largest health firm unifies under Mercy name". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved June 27, 2017.
  15. ^ "Hospitals in Cincinnati, Ohio". Mercy Health. Retrieved June 27, 2021.
  16. ^ "Emergency Room Locations in Cincinnati, Ohio". Mercy Health. Retrieved June 27, 2021.
  17. ^ "Hospitals in Lima, Ohio". Mercy Health. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  18. ^ "Putnam County Ambulatory Care Center". Mercy Health. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  19. ^ "Hospitals in Lorain, Ohio | Mercy Health Lorain". www.mercy.com. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  20. ^ "Hospitals in Springfield, Ohio | Mercy Health Springfield". www.mercy.com. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  21. ^ "Dayton Springfield Emergency Center". Mercy Health. Retrieved June 27, 2021.
  22. ^ "Hospitals in Toledo, Ohio | Mercy Health Toledo". www.mercy.com. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  23. ^ "Toledo Emergency Room and Urgent Care Locations". Mercy Health. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  24. ^ "Hospitals in Youngstown, Ohio". Mercy Health. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  25. ^ "Youngstown Emergency Room and Urgent Care Locations". Mercy Health. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  26. ^ "Hospitals in Irvine, Kentucky". Mercy Health. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  27. ^ "Hospitals in Paducah, Kentucky". Mercy Health. Retrieved March 29, 2020.

External links[edit]