Merlin James

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Merlin James (born 1960 in Cardiff, Wales)[1] is an artist living and working in Glasgow, Scotland.

Life and work[edit]

James studied at Central School of Art and Design, London, and the Royal College of Art, London.[1] His college thesis, on French artist Jean Hélion, led to Hélion introducing him to London's Albemarle Gallery and subsequently to James' first solo exhibition there in 1990.[2] James moved from London to Glasgow in 2004.

Of roughly the same generation as the Young British Artists, James is perhaps unusual in making work on the model of the traditional easel picture.[1] It frequently takes the form of small-scale paintings on stretched canvas or polyester, sometimes incorporating artist-made frames.[3] He also makes drawings and prints.

As a critic Merlin James has published widely, including many articles and contributions to books and catalogues. In 2002 he became the first to hold the Alex Katz Visiting Chair in Painting at Cooper Union.[4] In 2007 James represented Wales at the 52nd Venice Biennale.[5]

Notable Solo Exhibitions[edit]

Notable Group Exhibitions[6][edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Dunne, Aidan (23 February 2012). "A Wizard in the Gallery". The Irish Times. Retrieved 2014-11-11 – via HighBeam Research. (Subscription required (help)). 
  2. ^ a b c Cohen, David (26 August 1996). "Painting with attitude: the art of creative spontaneity". The Independent. Retrieved 2014-11-11. 
  3. ^ Barry Schwabsky and Morgan Falconer et. al., Vitamin P2, Phaidon, London, 2011.
  4. ^ James, Merlin. "Painting per se" lecture delivered at Cooper Union Great Hall, New York, 28 February 2002.
  5. ^ Firth, Hannah and Merlin James. "Merlin James: artists from Wales at the 52nd International Art Exhibition, Venice." Cardiff, Wales. 2007.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h Merlin James at Aanant & Zoo, Berlin[better source needed]
  7. ^ Mansfield, Susan (26 March 2004). "Live reviews: Merlin James: Easel Painting". The Scotsman. Retrieved 2014-11-11 – via HighBeam Research. (Subscription required (help)). 

External links[edit]