Merrill Carlsmith

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J. Merrill Carlsmith
Born(1936-04-12)April 12, 1936
New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
DiedApril 19, 1984(1984-04-19) (aged 48)
Portola Valley, California, United States
NationalityAmerican
Alma materHarvard University
Spouse(s)
Lyn Carlsmith
(m. 1963⁠–⁠1984)
ChildrenChristopher Carlsmith, Kimberly Carlsmith Sampson, Kevin M. Carlsmith
Scientific career
FieldsPsychology
InstitutionsStanford University
ThesisStrength of Expectancy: Its Determinants and Effects (1963)
Doctoral advisorElliot Aronson
Doctoral studentsPhoebe C. Ellsworth

James Merrill Carlsmith (April 12, 1936 – April 19, 1984)[1] was an American social psychologist perhaps best known for his collaboration with Leon Festinger and Elliot Aronson in the creation and development of cognitive dissonance theory. He also worked extensively with Mark Lepper on the subject of attribution theory. With Jonathan L. Freedman and David O. Sears (his cousin) he wrote the textbook, Social Psychology (1970; subsequent editions published 1974, 1978, and 1981).[2]

Carlsmith was married to social psychologist Lyn Carlsmith (born Karolyn Gai Kuckenberg, October 7, 1932 – September 1, 2011) from 1963 until his death,[3] and had three children: Christopher, Kimberly, and Kevin (October 17, 1967 – November 19, 2011).[4] He graduated from Stanford University and Harvard University.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "J. Merrill Carlsmith 1936–1984" (PDF). Stanford University. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 27, 2011. Retrieved February 3, 2011.
  2. ^ Social Psychology [WorldCat listing]. WorldCat.org. OCLC 79448. Retrieved 4 January 2018.
  3. ^ "Lyn K Carlsmith Oct. 7, 1932-Sept. 1, 2011". Palo Alto Online. Retrieved 4 January 2018.
  4. ^ "Kevin M. Carlsmith Oct. 17-1967-Nov. 19, 2011". Palo Alto Online. Retrieved 4 January 2018.
  5. ^ "J. Merrill Carlsmith 1936–1984" (PDF). Stanford University. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 27, 2011. Retrieved February 3, 2011.