Norfenefrine

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Norfenefrine
Norfenefrine.png
Ball-and-stick model of (R)-Norfenefrine
Clinical data
Other namesNorfenephrine
Norphenephrine
Norphenylephrine
meta-Norsynephrine
meta-Octopamine
3-Octopamine
AHFS/Drugs.comInternational Drug Names
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
  • In general: ℞ (Prescription only)
Pharmacokinetic data
Metabolismm-hydroxymandelic acid[1][2]
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.007.844 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC8H11NO2
Molar mass153.181 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
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Norfenefrine (INN; also known as meta-octopamine, 3-octopamine, and 3,β-dihydroxyphenethylamine) is an adrenergic agent used as a sympathomimetic drug which is marketed in Europe, Japan, and Mexico.[3][4] Along with its structural isomer p-octopamine and the tyramines, norfenefrine is a naturally occurring, endogenous trace amine and plays a role as a minor neurotransmitter in the brain.[5]

Some brand names for it include Coritat, Energona, Hypolind, and Novadral.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hengstmann, J. H.; Konen, W; Konen, C; Eichelbaum, M; Dengler, H. J. (1974). "The physiological disposition of p-octopamine in man". Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology. 283 (1): 93–106. doi:10.1007/bf00500148. PMID 4277715. S2CID 35523412.
  2. ^ d’Andrea, Giovanni; Nordera, Gianpietro; Pizzolato, Gilberto; Bolner, Andrea; Colavito, Davide; Flaibani, Raffaella; Leon, Alberta (2010). "Trace amine metabolism in Parkinson's disease: Low circulating levels of octopamine in early disease stages". Neuroscience Letters. 469 (3): 348–51. doi:10.1016/j.neulet.2009.12.025. PMID 20026245. S2CID 12797090.
  3. ^ Macdonald F (1997). Dictionary of Pharmacological Agents. CRC Press. p. 104. ISBN 978-0-412-46630-4. Retrieved 24 April 2012.
  4. ^ Index Nominum 2000: International Drug Directory. Taylor & Francis. 2000. p. 750. ISBN 978-3-88763-075-1. Retrieved 24 April 2012.
  5. ^ Danielson TJ, Boulton AA, Robertson HA (December 1977). "m-Octopamine, p-octopamine and phenylethanolamine in rat brain: a sensitive, specific assay and the effects of some drugs". Journal of Neurochemistry. 29 (6): 1131–5. doi:10.1111/j.1471-4159.1977.tb06519.x. PMID 340613.