Metabotropic glutamate receptor 8

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Glutamate receptor, metabotropic 8
Identifiers
Symbols GRM8 ; GLUR8; GPRC1H; MGLUR8; mGlu8
External IDs OMIM601116 MGI1351345 HomoloGene654 IUPHAR: 296 ChEMBL: 3228 GeneCards: GRM8 Gene
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 2918 14823
Ensembl ENSG00000179603 ENSMUSG00000024211
UniProt O00222 P47743
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_000845 NM_008174
RefSeq (protein) NP_000836 NP_032200
Location (UCSC) Chr 7:
126.44 – 127.25 Mb
Chr 6:
27.28 – 28.14 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

Metabotropic glutamate receptor 8 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the GRM8 gene.[1][2]

Function[edit]

L-glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and activates both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. Glutamatergic neurotransmission is involved in most aspects of normal brain function and can be perturbed in many neuropathologic conditions. The metabotropic glutamate receptors are a family of G protein-coupled receptors, that have been divided into 3 groups on the basis of sequence homology, putative signal transduction mechanisms, and pharmacologic properties. Group I includes GRM1 and GRM5 and these receptors have been shown to activate phospholipase C. Group II includes GRM2 and GRM3 while Group III includes GRM4, GRM6, GRM7 and GRM8. Group II and III receptors are linked to the inhibition of the cyclic AMP cascade but differ in their agonist selectivities. Alternative splice variants of GRM8 have been described but their full-length nature has not been determined.[2]

Ligands[edit]

See also[edit]

Model organisms[edit]

Model organisms have been used in the study of GRM8 function. A conditional knockout mouse line called Grm8tm2a(KOMP)Wtsi was generated at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.[4] Male and female animals underwent a standardized phenotypic screen[5] to determine the effects of deletion.[6][7][8][9] Additional screens performed: - In-depth immunological phenotyping[10]



References[edit]

  1. ^ Scherer SW, Duvoisin RM, Kuhn R, Heng HH, Belloni E, Tsui LC (Mar 1997). "Localization of two metabotropic glutamate receptor genes, GRM3 and GRM8, to human chromosome 7q". Genomics 31 (2): 230–3. doi:10.1006/geno.1996.0036. PMID 8824806. 
  2. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: GRM8 glutamate receptor, metabotropic 8". 
  3. ^ Thomas NK, Wright RA, Howson PA, Kingston AE, Schoepp DD, Jane DE (2001). "(S)-3,4-DCPG, a potent and selective mGlu8a receptor agonist, activates metabotropic glutamate receptors on primary afferent terminals in the neonatal rat spinal cord". Neuropharmacology 40 (3): 311–8. doi:10.1016/S0028-3908(00)00169-6. PMID 11166323. 
  4. ^ Gerdin AK (2010). "The Sanger Mouse Genetics Programme: high throughput characterisation of knockout mice". Acta Opthalmologica 88: 925-7.doi:10.1111/j.1755-3768.2010.4142.x: Wiley. 
  5. ^ a b "International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium". 
  6. ^ Skarnes WC, Rosen B, West AP, Koutsourakis M, Bushell W, Iyer V, Mujica AO, Thomas M, Harrow J, Cox T, Jackson D, Severin J, Biggs P, Fu J, Nefedov M, de Jong PJ, Stewart AF, Bradley A (Jun 2011). "A conditional knockout resource for the genome-wide study of mouse gene function". Nature 474 (7351): 337–42. doi:10.1038/nature10163. PMC 3572410. PMID 21677750. 
  7. ^ Dolgin E (Jun 2011). "Mouse library set to be knockout". Nature 474 (7351): 262–3. doi:10.1038/474262a. PMID 21677718. 
  8. ^ Collins FS, Rossant J, Wurst W (Jan 2007). "A mouse for all reasons". Cell 128 (1): 9–13. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2006.12.018. PMID 17218247. 
  9. ^ White JK, Gerdin AK, Karp NA, Ryder E, Buljan M, Bussell JN, Salisbury J, Clare S, Ingham NJ, Podrini C, Houghton R, Estabel J, Bottomley JR, Melvin DG, Sunter D, Adams NC, Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project, Tannahill D, Logan DW, Macarthur DG, Flint J, Mahajan VB, Tsang SH, Smyth I, Watt FM, Skarnes WC, Dougan G, Adams DJ, Ramirez-Solis R, Bradley A, Steel KP (2013). "Genome-wide generation and systematic phenotyping of knockout mice reveals new roles for many genes". Cell 154 (2): 452–64. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2013.06.022. PMID 23870131. 
  10. ^ a b "Infection and Immunity Immunophenotyping (3i) Consortium". 

Further reading[edit]

  • Scherer SW, Soder S, Duvoisin RM, Huizenga JJ, Tsui LC (1997). "The human metabotropic glutamate receptor 8 (GRM8) gene: a disproportionately large gene located at 7q31.3-q32.1". Genomics 44 (2): 232–6. doi:10.1006/geno.1997.4842. PMID 9299241. 
  • Wu S, Wright RA, Rockey PK, Burgett SG, Arnold JS, Rosteck PR, Johnson BG, Schoepp DD, Belagaje RM (1998). "Group III human metabotropic glutamate receptors 4, 7 and 8: molecular cloning, functional expression, and comparison of pharmacological properties in RGT cells". Brain Res. Mol. Brain Res. 53 (1–2): 88–97. doi:10.1016/S0169-328X(97)00277-5. PMID 9473604. 
  • Malherbe P, Kratzeisen C, Lundstrom K, Richards JG, Faull RL, Mutel V (1999). "Cloning and functional expression of alternative spliced variants of the human metabotropic glutamate receptor 8". Brain Res. Mol. Brain Res. 67 (2): 201–10. doi:10.1016/S0169-328X(99)00050-9. PMID 10216218. 
  • Thomas NK, Wright RA, Howson PA, Kingston AE, Schoepp DD, Jane DE (2001). "(S)-3,4-DCPG, a potent and selective mGlu8a receptor agonist, activates metabotropic glutamate receptors on primary afferent terminals in the neonatal rat spinal cord". Neuropharmacology 40 (3): 311–8. doi:10.1016/S0028-3908(00)00169-6. PMID 11166323. 
  • Enz R (2002). "The actin-binding protein Filamin-A interacts with the metabotropic glutamate receptor type 7". FEBS Lett. 514 (2–3): 184–8. doi:10.1016/S0014-5793(02)02361-X. PMID 11943148. 
  • Tang Z, El Far O, Betz H, Scheschonka A (2006). "Pias1 interaction and sumoylation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 8". J. Biol. Chem. 280 (46): 38153–9. doi:10.1074/jbc.M508168200. PMID 16144832. 
  • Kobayashi Y, Akiyoshi J, Kanehisa M, Ichioka S, Tanaka Y, Tsuru J, Hanada H, Kodama K, Isogawa K, Tsutsumi T (2007). "Lack of polymorphism in genes encoding mGluR 7, mGluR 8, GABA(A) receptor alfa-6 subunit and nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor and panic disorder". Psychiatr. Genet. 17 (1): 9. doi:10.1097/YPG.0b013e32801118bc. PMID 17167337. 

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.