Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

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Methanocaldococcus jannaschii
Scientific classification
Domain: Archaea
Kingdom: Euryarchaeota
Phylum: Euryarchaeota
Class: Methanococci
Order: Methanococcales
Family: Methanocaldococcaceae
Genus: Methanocaldococcus
Species: M. jannaschii
Binomial name
Methanocaldococcus jannaschii
Synonyms
  • Methanococcus jannaschii (Jones 1983)

Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (formerly Methanococcus jannaschii) is a thermophilic methanogenic archaean in the class Methanococci. It was the first archaeon to have its complete genome sequenced.[1] The sequencing identified many genes unique to the archaea. Many of the synthesis pathways for methanogenic cofactors were worked out biochemically in this organism,[2] as were several other archaeal-specific metabolic pathways.

History[edit]

Methanocaldococcus jannaschii was isolated from a submarine hydrothermal vent at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.[3]

Sequencing[edit]

Methanocaldococcus jannaschii was sequenced by a group at TIGR led by Craig Venter[4] using whole-genome shotgun sequencing. Methanocaldococcus jannaschii represented the first member of the Archaea to have its genome sequenced. According to Venter, the unique features of the genome provided strong evidence that there are three domains of life.[4]

Taxonomy[edit]

Methanocaldoccus jannaschii is a member of the genus Methanocaldococcus (previously a part of Methanococcus) and is therefore sometimes referred to as a "class I" methanogen (e.g. [1]).

Biology and biochemistry[edit]

Methanocaldococcus jannaschii is a thermophilic methanogen, meaning it grows by making methane as a metabolic byproduct. It is only capable of growth on carbon dioxide and hydrogen as primary energy sources, unlike many other methanococci (such as Methanococcus maripalidus) which can also use formate as a primary energy source.[3] The genome includes many hydrogenases, such as a 5,10-methenyltetrahydromethanopterin hydrogenase,[5] a ferredoxin hydrogenase (eha), and a coenzyme F420 hydrogenase.[6]

Proteomic studies showed that M. jannaschii contains a large number of inteins: 19 were discovered by one study.[7]

Many novel metabolic pathways have been worked out in M. jannaschii, including the pathways for synthesis of many methanogenic cofactors,[2] riboflavin,[8] and novel amino acid synthesis pathways.[citation needed] Many information processing pathways have also been studied in this organism, such as an archaeal-specific DNA polymerase family.[9]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Carol J. Bult, Owen White, Gary J. Olsen, Lixin Zhou, Robert D. Fleischmann, Granger G. Sutton, Judith A. Blake, Lisa M. FitzGerald, Rebecca A. Clayton, Jeannine D. Gocayne, Anthony R. Kerlavage, Brian A. Dougherty, Jean-Francois Tomb, Mark D. Adams, Claudia I. Reich, Ross Overbeek, Ewen F. Kirkness, Keith G. Weinstock, Joseph M. Merrick, Anna Glodek, John L. Scott, Neil S. M. Geoghagen, Janice F. Weidman, Joyce L. Fuhrmann, Dave Nguyen, Teresa R. Utterback, Jenny M. Kelley, Jeremy D. Peterson, Paul W. Sadow, Michael C. Hanna, Matthew D. Cotton, Kevin M. Roberts, Margaret A. Hurst, Brian P. Kaine, Mark Borodovsky, Hans-Peter Klenk, Claire M. Fraser, Hamilton O. Smith, Carl R. Woese & J. Craig Venter (1996). "Complete genome sequence of the methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcus jannaschii". Science. 273 (5278): 1058–1073. doi:10.1126/science.273.5278.1058. PMID 8688087. 
  2. ^ a b Robert H. White (2001). "Biosynthesis of the methanogenic cofactors". Vitamins and Hormones. 61: 299–337. doi:10.1016/s0083-6729(01)61010-0. PMID 11153270. 
  3. ^ a b W. J. Jones, J. A. Leigh, F. Mayer, C. R. Woese & R. S. Wolfe (1983). "Methanococcus jannaschii sp. nov., an extremely thermophilic methanogen from a submarine hydrothermal vent". Archives of Microbiology. 136 (4): 254–261. doi:10.1007/BF00425213. 
  4. ^ a b Nicholas Wade (23 August 1996). "Deep sea yields a clue to life's origin". New York Times. 
  5. ^ Erica J. Lyon, Seigo Shima, Gerrit Buurman, Shantanu Chowdhuri, Alfred Batschauer, Klaus Steinbach & Rudolf K. Thauer (January 2004). "UV-A/blue-light inactivation of the 'metal-free' hydrogenase (Hmd) from methanogenic archaea". European Journal of Biochemistry. 271 (1): 195–204. doi:10.1046/j.1432-1033.2003.03920.x. PMID 14686932. 
  6. ^ Rudolf K. Thauer, Anne-Kristin Kaster, Meike Goenrich, Michael Schick, Takeshi Hiromoto & Seigo Shima (2010). "Hydrogenases from methanogenic archaea, nickel, a novel cofactor, and H2 storage". Annual Review of Biochemistry. 79: 507–536. doi:10.1146/annurev.biochem.030508.152103. 
  7. ^ Wenhong Zhu, Claudia I. Reich, Gary J. Olsen, Carol S. Giometti & John R. Yates III (2004). "Shotgun proteomics of Methanococcus jannaschii and insights into methanogenesis". Journal of Proteome Research. 3 (3): 538–548. doi:10.1021/pr034109s. PMID 15253435. 
  8. ^ Ilka Haase, Simone Mörtl, Peter Köhler, Adelbert Bacher & Markus Fischer (2003). "Biosynthesis of riboflavin in Archaea: 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine synthase of Methanococcus jannaschii". European Journal of Biochemistry. 270 (5): 1025–1032. doi:10.1046/j.1432-1033.2003.03478.x. PMID 12603336. 
  9. ^ Yoshizumi Ishino, Kayoko Komori, Isaac K. O. Cann & Yosuke Koga (1998). "A novel DNA polymerase family found in Archaea". Journal of Bacteriology. 180 (8): 2232–2236. PMC 107154Freely accessible. PMID 9555910. 

External links[edit]