Methyl pyruvate

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Methyl pyruvate
Brenztraubensäuremethylester.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Methyl 2-oxopropanoate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
1361953
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.009.081 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 209-987-4
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C4H6O3/c1-3(5)4(6)7-2/h1-2H3
    Key: CWKLZLBVOJRSOM-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CC(=O)C(=O)OC
Properties
C4H6O3
Molar mass 102.089 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Melting point −22 °C (−8 °F; 251 K)
Boiling point 135 °C (275 °F; 408 K)
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS02: FlammableGHS05: CorrosiveGHS07: Exclamation mark
Danger
H226, H317, H318, H335
P210, P233, P240, P241, P242, P243, P261, P271, P272, P280, P302+P352, P303+P361+P353, P304+P340, P305+P351+P338, P310, P312, P321, P333+P313, P363, P370+P378, P403+P233, P403+P235, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Methyl pyruvate is the organic compound with the formula CH3C(O)CO2CH3. This colorless liquid is the methyl ester of pyruvic acid. It has attracted interest as a prochiral precursor to alanine and lactic acid.[1] It is prepared by esterification of pyruvic acid.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Abdel-Magid, Ahmed F.; Carson, Kenneth G.; Harris, Bruce D.; Maryanoff, Cynthia A.; Shah, Rekha D. (1996). "Reductive Amination of Aldehydes and Ketones with Sodium Triacetoxyborohydride. Studies on Direct and Indirect Reductive Amination Procedures". Journal of Organic Chemistry. 61 (11): 3849–3862. doi:10.1021/JO960057X. PMID 11667239.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  2. ^ A. Weissberger and C. J. Kibler (1944). "Methyl Pyruvate". Org. Synth. 24: 72. doi:10.15227/orgsyn.024.0072.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)