Methyldioxirane

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Methyldioxirane
Methyldioxiran.svg
Names
IUPAC name
3-Methyldioxirane
Other names
Methyldioxirane
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
  • InChI=1S/C2H4O2/c1-2-3-4-2/h2H,1H3
    Key: NOZLREUTKGWBPY-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CC1OO1
Properties
C2H4O2
Molar mass 60.052 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Methyldioxirane is an organic chemical consisting of a methyl group as substituent on a dioxirane ring. It is a highly unstable structure that has been proposed as part of a decomposition reaction of acetaldehyde oxide, the Criegee intermediate during some ozonolysis reactions. The methyl group helps reduce the rate of ring-opening of the dioxirane, but it does not become usefully stable until a second substient is present as in the structure of dimethyldioxirane.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cremera, Dieter; Kraka, Elfi; G Szalay, Peter (1998). "Decomposition modes of dioxirane, methyldioxirane and dimethyldioxirane—a CCSD(T), MR-AQCC and DFT investigation". Chemical Physics Letters. 292 (1–2): 97–109. Bibcode:1998CPL...292...97C. doi:10.1016/S0009-2614(98)00678-2.
  2. ^ Selçuki, Cenk; Aviyente, Viktorya (2001). "Electrostatic solvent effects on the conversion of substituted carbonyl oxides to dioxiranes". Molecular Modeling Annual. 7 (4): 70–79. doi:10.1007/s008940100006. S2CID 91633921.