Methyltestosterone

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Methyltestosterone
Methyltestosterone.svg
Clinical data
Trade names Android, Androral, Metandren, Oraviron, Testred, Virilon
AHFS/Drugs.com Monograph
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Pharmacokinetic data
Metabolism Liver
Biological half-life 6-8 hours
Excretion 90% urine / 10% feces
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.333
Chemical and physical data
Formula C20H30O2
Molar mass 302.451
3D model (Jmol)
 NYesY (what is this?)  (verify)

Methyltestosterone (brand names Android, Androral, Metandren, Oraviron, Testred, Virilon),[1] also known as 17α-methyltestosterone or as 17α-methylandrost-4-en-17β-ol-3-one, is a synthetic, orally active androgenic-anabolic steroid (AAS) and 17α-methylated derivative of testosterone that is used to treat males with androgen deficiency.[2] It bears close structural similarity to testosterone, but has a methyl group at the C17α position in order to increase oral bioavailability. Due to efficient aromatization into the potent estrogen methylestradiol, methyltestosterone has relatively high estrogenicity and hence potential side effects such as gynecomastia.[3][4]

Confiscated methyltestosterone.

History[edit]

Methyltestosterone was first synthesized in 1935, and was the first 17α-alkylated AAS to be synthesized.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Methyltestosterone Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing". WebMD. Retrieved 2012-02-13. 
  2. ^ "Truestar health". 
  3. ^ Detlef Thieme; Peter Hemmersbach (18 December 2009). Doping in Sports. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 470–. ISBN 978-3-540-79088-4. 
  4. ^ Andrea R. Genazzani (17 January 2006). Postmenopausal Osteoporosis: Hormones & Other Therapies. Taylor & Francis US. pp. 243–. ISBN 978-1-84214-311-7. 
  5. ^ Shahidi NT (2001). "A review of the chemistry, biological action, and clinical applications of anabolic-androgenic steroids". Clin Ther. 23 (9): 1355–90. PMID 11589254. doi:10.1016/s0149-2918(01)80114-4.