Metope (mythology)

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In Greek mythology, Metope /mɪˈtp/ (Ancient Greek: Μετώπη) may refer to the following individuals:

  • Metope, a river-nymph, the daughter of the river Ladon.[1] Her waters were near the town of Stymphalus in the Peloponnesus.[2] She married the river god Asopus by whom she had several (either 12 or 20) daughters, including Aegina, Salamis, Sinope, Euboea, Tanagra, Thespia, Thebe, Corcyra, Ismene, and Harpina; and possibly sons, including Pelagon and Ismenus.[3] The question of the exact parentage of these children of Asopus is very vague.
  • Metope, consort of the river god Sangarius. Some say these were the possible parents of Hecuba.[4] She may be identical or different from the above Metope.
  • Metope, an Epirotian princess as the daughter of King Echetus. She had an intrigue with a lover and as a punishment her father mutilated the lover and blinded Metope by piercing her eyes with bronze needles. He then incarcerated her in a tower and gave her grains of bronze, promising that she would regain her sight when she had ground these grains into flour.[5] Eustathius and the scholia on this passage call the daughter and her lover Amphissa and Aechmodicus respectively.[6][7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Apollodorus, 3.12.6
  2. ^ Pindar, Olympian Odes 6.83
  3. ^ Diodorus, 4.72.1
  4. ^ Apollodorus, 3.12.4
  5. ^ Homer, Odyssey 18.85, 18.116 & 21.307; Apollonius, 4.1093
  6. ^ George W. Mooney, Commentary on Apollonius: Argonautica 4.1093
  7. ^ Eustathius on Homer, p. 1839

References[edit]

  • Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. ISBN 0-674-99135-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica translated by Robert Cooper Seaton (1853-1915), R. C. Loeb Classical Library Volume 001. London, William Heinemann Ltd, 1912. Online version at the Topos Text Project.
  • Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica. George W. Mooney. London. Longmans, Green. 1912. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History translated by Charles Henry Oldfather. Twelve volumes. Loeb Classical Library. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press; London: William Heinemann, Ltd. 1989. Vol. 3. Books 4.59–8. Online version at Bill Thayer's Web Site
  • Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotheca Historica. Vol 1-2. Immanel Bekker. Ludwig Dindorf. Friedrich Vogel. in aedibus B. G. Teubneri. Leipzig. 1888-1890. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Homer, The Odyssey with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, PH.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1919. ISBN 978-0674995611. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Pindar, Odes translated by Diane Arnson Svarlien. 1990. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Pindar, The Odes of Pindar including the Principal Fragments with an Introduction and an English Translation by Sir John Sandys, Litt.D., FBA. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1937. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.