Metre–tonne–second system of units

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For a topical guide to this subject, see Outline of the metric system.

The metre–tonne–second or MTS system of units is a system of physical units. It was invented in France, hence the unit names sthène and pièze, and became its legal system between 1919 and 1961 ("décret" 5 May 1961, "Journal Officiel"). It was adopted by the Soviet Union in 1933 and abolished there in 1955. It was a metric and coherent system of units, much as SI and the centimetre-gram-second system (CGS), but with larger units for industrial use, whereas the CGS system was regarded as suitable for laboratory use only.[1][2]

Units[edit]

The base units of the MTS system are as follows:

1 m3 ≡ 1 kL
1 t = 103 kg = 1 Mg
1 sn = 1 t·m/s2 = 103 N = 1 kN
1 sn·m = 1 t·m2/s2 = 103 J = 1 kJ
1 sn·m/s = 1 t·m2/s3 = 103 W = 1 kW
1 pz = 1 t/m·s2 = 103 Pa = 1 kPa = 1 centibar (cbar)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "System of Measurement Units". IEEE Global History Network. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Retrieved 2011-03-21. 
  2. ^ "Notions de physique - Systèmes d'unités" [Symbols used in physics - units of measure] (in French). Hydrelect.info. Retrieved 2011-03-21.