Metribuzin

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Metribuzin
Skeletal formula of metribuzin
Space-filling model of the metribuzin molecule
Names
IUPAC name
4-Amino-6-tert-butyl-3-methylsulfanyl-1,2,4-triazin-5-one
Other names
4-Amino-6-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4-triazin-5(4H)-one
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.040.175
Properties
C8H14N4OS
Molar mass 214.29 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless, crystalline solid[1]
Density 1.31 g/cm3
Melting point 125 °C (257 °F; 398 K)
0.1% (20 °C)[1]
Vapor pressure 0.0000004 mmHg (20 °C)[1]
Hazards
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
none[1]
REL (Recommended)
5 mg/m3[1]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
N.D.[1]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Metribuzin (4-amino-6-tert-butyl-3-(methylthio)-as-triazin-5(4H)-one) is an herbicide used both pre- and post-emergence in crops including soy bean, potatoes, tomatoes and sugar cane. It acts by inhibiting photosynthesis by disrupting photosystem II.[2] It is widely used in agriculture and has been found to contaminate groundwater.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0430". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 
  2. ^ Terence Robert Roberts; David Herd Hutson (17 July 1998). Metabolic Pathways of Agrochemicals: Herbicides and plant growth regulators. Royal Society of Chemistry. pp. 662–. ISBN 978-0-85404-494-8. Retrieved 25 May 2012. 
  3. ^ Undabeytia, T. S.; Recio, E.; Maqueda, C.; Morillo, E.; Gómez-Pantoja, E.; Sánchez-Verdejo, T. (2011). "Reduced metribuzin pollution with phosphatidylcholine-clay formulations". Pest Management Science. 67 (3): 271–278. doi:10.1002/ps.2060. PMID 21308953. 

External links[edit]

  • Metribuzin in the Pesticide Properties DataBase (PPDB)