Metroid: Samus Returns

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Metroid: Samus Returns
The cover art shows Samus Aran, a woman in am orange, full-body armor, kneeling with her arm cannon raised in front of a starry sky.
Developer(s)
Publisher(s) Nintendo
Director(s)
  • Jose Luis Márquez
  • Takehiko Hosokawa
Producer(s) Yoshio Sakamoto
Designer(s)
  • Jacobo Luengo
  • Aleix Garrido Oberink
Programmer(s)
  • Fernando Zazo
  • Enrique Jesús García Amezcua
Artist(s) Rafael Jimenez Rodriguez
Composer(s) Daisuke Matsuoka
Series Metroid
Platform(s) Nintendo 3DS
Release 15 September 2017
Genre(s) Action-adventure
Mode(s) Single-player

Metroid: Samus Returns is a side-scrolling action-adventure game co-developed by MercurySteam and Nintendo EPD and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 3DS handheld game console. A part of the science fiction Metroid series, the game is a reimagining of the 1991 Game Boy game Metroid II: Return of Samus. Players control Samus Aran, who is sent by the Galactic Federation to exterminate the parasitic Metroids on their home planet of SR388. It was released worldwide on 15 September 2017.

The story and structure are similar to Metroid II, but the game adds controls, visuals, and gameplay, and introduces features new to 2D Metroid games, such as a melee counterattack, the ability to fire freely at any angle, and a selection of abilities. Development of Samus Returns began in 2015, produced by longtime Metroid developer Yoshio Sakamoto. The game received positive reviews for its visuals and improved gameplay over the original game, with many viewing it as a return to form for the series.

Gameplay[edit]

A screenshot of the Nintendo 3DS system's two screens: the top screen shows the player character standing in front of a round, orange gate while surrounded by a purple fog, and the bottom screen shows a map of the game world along with information such as how much health and how many missiles the player has left.
The player controls Samus Aran from a side-scrolling perspective on the 3DS top screen, and sees the HUD and map on the bottom screen.

Metroid: Samus Returns is a side-scrolling action-adventure game played on a two-dimensional plane with three-dimensional graphics.[1][2] Players take control of series protagonist Samus Aran, a bounty hunter who explores labyrinthine environments, kills hostile aliens, and collects power-ups to gain access to new areas.[2][3] Samus Returns is a reimagining of the 1991 Game Boy game Metroid II: Return of Samus;[4] as such, it features a story and structure similar to the original game, but with new controls, visuals, and gameplay.[2][3][5]

The game introduces some features that are new to the 2D Metroid games.[5] Samus can perform a melee counterattack to deal critical damage on foes. In Metroid II, her firing direction was limited to specific angles, whereas now she is capable of firing freely at any angle.[3] Samus also has a selection of new powers, called Aeion abilities, that rely on an energy gauge for their usage. One example of an Aeion ability is the Scan Pulse, which lets Samus scan the surrounding environment for hidden pathways and items. The game also features Teleport Stations, allowing Samus to fast travel between areas.[6] Several abilities introduced after Metroid II are implemented in Samus Returns, such as the Grapple Beam, Power Bombs, and Super Missiles.[7]

Samus Returns features Amiibo support,[3] with compatible figurines being based on the Metroid series. When scanned, players can unlock reserve tanks and a Metroid Marker which can be used to locate nearby Metroids. After the player finishes the game at least once, certain Amiibo-exclusive content is unlocked; such content includes a new Fusion Mode, which features Samus's Fusion Suit and offers an increased level of difficulty, and multiple art galleries.[8] A standard hard mode is also unlocked upon completing the game, but it does not require an Amiibo figurine.[7][9]

Plot[edit]

In the year 20X5, a lone bounty hunter named Samus Aran is sent by the Galactic Federation to infiltrate the Space Pirate base on the planet Zebes. There, she foils the Space Pirates' plans to use the parasitic organisms called Metroids, and defeats the Space Pirate leader, the Mother Brain. Seeing the threat posed by the Metroids, the Federation sends a special squadron of elite soldiers to the Metroids' home planet of SR388 to investigate, but the squadron soon goes missing. After retrieving a small sampling of data confirming a Metroid presence within the planet, the Federation decides to send Samus to SR388 to exterminate the species once and for all.[10]

Samus lands on the surface of SR388 and explores the planet, travelling through its caverns. She encounters the Metroids in different evolution stages, growing from small jellyfish-like creatures to large reptilian beasts. After killing most of the planet's Metroids, Samus finds and destroys the Queen Metroid.[11] Shortly afterward, Samus discovers a Metroid egg that hatches in front of her. The Metroid hatchling immediately imprints onto Samus, thinking that she is its mother. Refusing to eliminate the infant hatchling bonded to her, Samus has completed the mission.[12] As Samus and the infant Metroid reach the planet's surface to return to her gunship, they are attacked by a half-mechanical Ridley.[13] After a long battle, Ridley is defeated, and Samus and the Metroid hatchling leave the planet together in her gunship.[14] In a post-credits scene, a Hornoad is seen wandering on the planet's surface, gnawing at Ridley's discarded mechanical claw before being infected by an X parasite.[15]

Based on the item completion rating, players may unlock the history of the Chozo race that inhabited SR388 in a series of images. After landing on the planet, the Chozo encountered the X parasites, which use the planet's creatures as hosts. To this end, the Chozo created the Metroids using their advanced technology to combat the X parasites. Although the Chozo lived in peace when the X parasites were gone, the Metroids grew out of control and the civilisation came under threat. A discussion was held between two Chozo leaders; the final image reveals that one leader seemingly killed the other, standing over its body while overlooking its army.[16]

Development[edit]

Yoshio Sakamoto of Nintendo EPD served as the game's lead producer

Metroid: Samus Returns was developed collaboratively by the Spanish video game development studio MercurySteam and the Japanese company Nintendo.[2][17] Yoshio Sakamoto, executive officer of Nintendo's Entertainment Planning & Development division, served as the game's producer,[5][18] while Takehiko Hosokawa of the same studio was the co-director, along with Jose Luis Márquez of MercurySteam.[19] As thirteen years had passed since the last 2D Metroid game—2004's Zero Mission—was released, Sakamoto had a desire to create a new game in this style.[2] He was also aware of the growing demand from fans for a new 2D Metroid game. Sakamoto had heard that MercurySteam were interested in taking on the challenge of remaking a Metroid game, so he visited their studio to organise a collaboration.[17] Although Sakamoto did not work on Metroid II, he believed it to be an important game within the series and so he was enthusiastic about remaking the title.[2] Enric Álvarez, the head of MercurySteam, described their collaboration with Nintendo as an "incredible" achievement for the developer.[20] The development on Samus Returns began in 2015.[2]

Sakamoto noted that the potential for 2D games in the Metroid franchise had opened up for Nintendo following the announcement of the game.[6][5] He expressed that he was keen to evolve some of the traditions in 2D Metroid games.[5] As a remake, he wanted to preserve some of the originality and wanted to avoid changing things without good reason. Their approach was to add to aspects which improved upon the game's core concept.[2] These ideas led to some control enhancements, such as the addition of free aiming for more precise firing.[5] The idea of a melee counterattack came from MercurySteam, who had implemented a similar parry mechanic in their 2013 game, Castlevania: Lords of Shadow – Mirror of Fate.[17] Sakamoto felt that the inclusion of the melee counterattack offered players an alternative combat style, in contrast to previous games where the player had to rely on dodging charge attacks from enemies and then defeating them from afar.[5]

The decision to transition from the 2D pixel art of previous Metroid titles to 3D polygonal graphics was made so that the development team could incorporate a lot of varied animation and use different angles to enhance the cutscenes.[17] The music was composed by Daisuke Matsuoka and directed by Kenji Yamamoto,[19] with the latter previously co-composing the music for the 1994 Super Nintendo Entertainment System game Super Metroid.[6]

Release[edit]

The project was revealed on 13 June 2017 during Nintendo's Treehouse livestream at the Electronic Entertainment Expo 2017.[3] It was released for the Nintendo 3DS handheld game console on 15 September 2017.[1] A special edition version of the game includes a reversible cover and a soundtrack CD called Samus Archives, featuring 25 tracks from numerous Metroid games including Samus Returns.[6] A European Legacy Edition version also includes a soundtrack CD, alongside a 40-page art book, a Morph Ball keyring, an S-marked pin badge, a download code for Metroid II, and a steelbook designed in the likeness of a Game Boy cartridge.[21] Two Amiibo figurines were released alongside the game;[3] one figurine is of Samus kneeling in the pose shown on the cover art of Metroid II, while the other is of a Metroid creature that has escaped containment.[22] A special "Samus Edition" of the New Nintendo 3DS XL console was also released alongside the game.[23]

Reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate score
Aggregator Score
Metacritic 85/100[24]
Review scores
Publication Score
Destructoid 8/10[25]
Famitsu 32/40[26]
Game Informer 9.75/10[27]
GameSpot 9/10[28]
IGN 8.5/10[29]
Nintendo Life 10/10[30]
Nintendo World Report 9.5/10[32]
Polygon 9/10[31]
USgamer 5/5 stars[33]

Metroid: Samus Returns received "generally favorable" reviews from professional critics, according to review aggregator Metacritic.[24] Andrew Webster at The Verge viewed Samus Returns as a return to the series' roots.[34] Peter Brown of GameSpot believed that it represented a look at the potential future for 2D Metroid games.[28] Russ Frushtick of Polygon thought that the game's visuals were "remarkable",[31] while Webster thought that the game's 3D visuals made it easier and more playable than Metroid II. Webster also praised its use of the handheld's glasses-free 3D effect, stating that it added a "wonderful" sense of depth.[34] The game's soundtrack by Daisuke Matsuoka also received praise,[33] with Chris Carter of Destructoid calling the melodies "hauntingly beautiful".[25]

Chris Scullion at Nintendo Life wrote that the "Scan Pulse" ability was a useful feature and made the game "far more entertaining" as a result,[30] although Brown felt that it removed some of the thrill of discovery.[28] Webster called the game's combat "fast and fluid",[34] while Brown wrote that it was more aggressive and satisfying than expected.[28] Conversely, Martin Robinson of Eurogamer criticised the effect of the counterattack system, writing that it led "to a staccato rhythm to the action as you're constantly stopped in your tracks for such one-note encounters".[35] IGN's Samuel Claiborn complained about the controls, stating the Samus's complicated weapon options have players "working the 3DS shoulder buttons, slider, and face buttons in a downright painful way".[29]

During its first week in the United Kingdom, Samus Returns was ranked eighth in an all-format chart.[36] It was the third best-selling game in Japan in its debut week, with 30,855 copies sold.[37] An additional 6,206 copies were sold the following week.[38] It was also the eighth best-selling game in the United States during September 2017.[39]

Accolades[edit]

Metroid: Samus Returns won the "Best Mobile Game" award at the Gamescom 2017 Awards.[40] It also won the Best Handheld Game category at The Game Awards 2017.[41] At the 2017 Golden Joystick Awards, Nintendo EPD won Studio of the Year, while the game received a nomination for Nintendo Game of the Year.[42] Samus Returns won Destructoid's award for Best Portable Game of 2017.[43] It also won IGN's Best 3DS Game as part of their Best of 2017 Awards.[44] The 2017 Game Critics Awards awarded Samus Returns for Best Handheld Game.[45] GameSpot listed it as one of five best Nintendo 3DS games in 2017.[46] Game Informer gave it the award each for "Best Mobile/Handheld Exclusive" in their "Best of 2017 Awards", and for "Best Handheld" in their 2017 Action Game of the Year Awards.[47][48] In their Reader's Choice Best of 2017 Awards, the game came up at second place for "Best Mobile/Handheld Exclusive".[49] Polygon ranked the game 30th on their list of the 50 best games of 2017.[50] It also won the Tappan Zee Bridge Award for Best Remake at the New York Game Awards 2018,[51] and won "Handheld Game of the Year" at the 21st Annual D.I.C.E. Awards.[52][53] The game won the award for "Control Design, 2D or Limited 3D" at the 17th Annual National Academy of Video Game Trade Reviewers Awards, whereas its other nomination was for "Original Light Mix Score, Franchise".[54][55]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Pereira, Chris (13 June 2017). "E3 2017: Metroid 2 Remake Samus Returns Coming To 3DS, Release Date And Special Edition Confirmed". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 8 July 2017. Retrieved 13 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Webster, Andrew (14 June 2017). "Samus Returns is a confident throwback to Metroid's roots". The Verge. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 14 June 2017. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Frank, Allegra (13 June 2017). "Metroid: Samus Returns comes to Nintendo 3DS this year (update)". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 13 June 2017. Retrieved 13 June 2017. 
  4. ^ Weinberger, Matt (13 June 2017). "After 26 years, Nintendo is bringing back a forgotten classic 'Metroid' game for a gorgeous remake". Business Insider. Axel Springer SE. Archived from the original on 8 August 2017. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Metroid: Samus Returns - Developer Diary (Nintendo 3DS) (YouTube video). Nintendo UK. 14 June 2017. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c d Schreier, Jason (13 June 2017). "Nintendo Has A Second Metroid Too, Metroid: Samus Returns For 3DS [Update: Gameplay Details]". Kotaku. Univision Communications. Archived from the original on 13 June 2017. Retrieved 13 June 2017. 
  7. ^ a b Sakamoto, Yoshio (23 August 2017). "Returning to Metroid". Eurogamer (Interview). Interviewed by Tom Phillips. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 24 August 2017. Retrieved 24 August 2017. 
  8. ^ McWhertor, Michael (31 July 2017). "Metroid: Samus Returns' hard mode seemingly locked behind amiibo". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 1 August 2017. Retrieved 7 August 2017. 
  9. ^ Kim, Matt (8 August 2017). "Nintendo Addresses the Metroid: Samus Returns Amiibo Controversy". USgamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 11 August 2017. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  10. ^ MercurySteam, Nintendo EPD (September 2017). Metroid: Samus Returns. Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo. Scene: Opening. 
  11. ^ MercurySteam, Nintendo EPD (September 2017). Metroid: Samus Returns. Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo. 
  12. ^ MercurySteam, Nintendo EPD (September 2017). Metroid: Samus Returns. Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo. Scene: Metroid hatchling. Level/area: Area 8. 
  13. ^ MercurySteam, Nintendo EPD (September 2017). Metroid: Samus Returns. Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo. Scene: Ridley. Level/area: Surface. 
  14. ^ MercurySteam, Nintendo EPD (September 2017). Metroid: Samus Returns. Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo. Scene: Ending. 
  15. ^ MercurySteam, Nintendo EPD (September 2017). Metroid: Samus Returns. Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo. Scene: Ending (post-credits). 
  16. ^ Tamburro, Paul (15 September 2017). "Metroid: Samus Returns' Ending Will Change the Future of the Series". Game Revolution. CraveOnline. Archived from the original on 16 September 2017. Retrieved 21 September 2017. 
  17. ^ a b c d Sakamoto, Yoshio; Márquez, Jose Luis (15 June 2017). "E3 2017: Metroid's Producer Talks MercurySteam's Contributions To Samus Returns". GameSpot (Interview). Interviewed by Kevin Knezevic. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 16 June 2017. Retrieved 16 June 2017. 
  18. ^ Metroid: Samus Returns - Game Reveal - Nintendo E3 2017 (YouTube video). Nintendo. 15 June 2017. Archived from the original on 24 June 2017. Retrieved 20 June 2017. 
  19. ^ a b MercurySteam, Nintendo EPD (September 2017). Metroid: Samus Returns. Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo. Scene: Credits. 
  20. ^ McFerran, Damien (8 September 2017). "Nintendo Made Us A Better Developer, Says Metroid: Samus Returns Studio MercurySteam". Nintendo Life. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 9 September 2017. Retrieved 9 September 2017. 
  21. ^ Arif, Shabana (26 June 2017). "Metroid: Samus Returns Collector's Edition for Europe is bloody marvellous". VG247. Videogaming247 Ltd. Archived from the original on 27 June 2017. Retrieved 1 July 2017. 
  22. ^ Phillips, Tom (13 June 2017). "Metroid: Samus Returns announced for 3DS". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 8 July 2017. Retrieved 13 June 2017. 
  23. ^ Webster, Andrew (8 August 2017). "Nintendo is releasing a sleek Metroid-themed 3DS in time for Samus' return". The Verge. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 9 August 2017. Retrieved 10 August 2017. 
  24. ^ a b "Metroid: Samus Returns". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 21 October 2017. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  25. ^ a b Carter, Chris (12 September 2017). "Review: Metroid: Samus Returns". Destructoid. Enthusiast Gaming. Archived from the original on 12 September 2017. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  26. ^ メトロイド サムスリターンズの評価・レビューとブログ [3DS] . Famitsu (in Japanese). Enterbrain. Archived from the original on 25 September 2017. Retrieved 25 September 2017. 
  27. ^ Reeves, Ben (12 September 2017). "A Charge Blast From The Past - Metroid: Samus Returns". Game Informer. GameStop. Archived from the original on 13 September 2017. Retrieved 29 September 2017. 
  28. ^ a b c d Brown, Peter (12 September 2017). "Metroid: Samus Returns Review". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 12 September 2017. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  29. ^ a b Claiborn, Samuel (12 September 2012). "Metroid: Samus Returns Review". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 12 September 2017. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  30. ^ a b Scullion, Chris (12 September 2017). "Review: Metroid: Samus Returns". Nintendo Life. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 12 September 2017. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  31. ^ a b Frushtick, Russ (12 September 2017). "Metroid: Samus Returns review". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 12 September 2017. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  32. ^ "Metroid: Samus Returns Review". 22 September 2017. Archived from the original on 17 September 2017. Retrieved 22 September 2017. 
  33. ^ a b Bailey, Kat (12 September 2017). "Metroid: Samus Returns Review: A Near Perfect Remake of an Underappreciated Gem". USgamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 12 September 2017. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  34. ^ a b c Webster, Andrew (12 September 2017). "Metroid: Samus Returns review: a sci-fi classic is reborn". The Verge. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 12 September 2017. Retrieved 13 September 2017. 
  35. ^ Robinson, Martin (12 September 2017). "Metroid: Samus Returns review". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 13 September 2017. Retrieved 13 September 2017. 
  36. ^ Whitehead, Thomas (20 September 2017). "Metroid: Samus Returns Makes Top 10 Debut in UK Charts". Nintendo Life. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 20 September 2017. Retrieved 20 September 2017. 
  37. ^ Romano, Sal (20 September 2017). "Media Create Sales: 9/11/17 – 9/17/17". Gematsu. Archived from the original on 20 September 2017. Retrieved 20 September 2017. 
  38. ^ 「ポッ拳 POKKÉN TOURNAMENT DX」5万3000本,「NBA 2K18」1万4000本の「ゲームソフト週間販売ランキング+」 . 4Gamer.net (in Japanese). Aetas Inc. 27 September 2012. Archived from the original on 28 September 2017. Retrieved 30 September 2017. 
  39. ^ Whitehead, Thomas (19 October 2017). "Nintendo of America Boasts of Major Sales Success in September's NPD Results". Nintendo Life. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 19 October 2017. Retrieved 19 October 2017. 
  40. ^ "Super Mario Odyssey sweeps Best Of Gamescom awards". Metro. 24 August 2017. Archived from the original on 27 August 2017. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  41. ^ Makuch, Eddie (8 December 2017). "The Game Awards 2017 Winners Headlined By Zelda: Breath Of The Wild's Game Of The Year". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 9 December 2017. Retrieved 8 December 2017. 
  42. ^ Gaito, Eri (13 November 2017). "Golden Joystick Awards 2017 Nominees". Best in Slot. Archived from the original on 10 January 2018. Retrieved 11 December 2017. 
  43. ^ Moyse, Chris (21 December 2017). "Destructoid's award for Best Portable Game of 2017 goes to..." Destructoid. Enthusiast Gaming. Archived from the original on 27 December 2017. Retrieved 27 December 2017. 
  44. ^ "Best of 2017 Awards: Best 3DS Game". IGN. Ziff Davis. 20 December 2017. Archived from the original on 10 January 2018. Retrieved 4 January 2018. 
  45. ^ "Game Critics Awards: Best of E3 2017 (2017 Winners)". Game Critics Awards. Archived from the original on 25 February 2015. Retrieved 4 January 2018. 
  46. ^ GameSpot staff (8 December 2017). "The 5 Best 3DS Games Of 2017". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 27 December 2017. Retrieved 27 December 2017. 
  47. ^ Game Informer staff (4 January 2018). "Game Informer's Best Of 2017 Awards". Game Informer. GameStop. Archived from the original on 6 January 2018. Retrieved 6 January 2018. 
  48. ^ Miller, Matt (5 January 2018). "2017 Action Game of the Year Awards (Page 2)". Game Informer. GameStop. Archived from the original on 10 January 2018. Retrieved 6 January 2018. 
  49. ^ Cork, Jeff (4 January 2018). "Reader's Choice Best Of 2017 Awards". Game Informer. GameStop. Archived from the original on 7 January 2018. Retrieved 6 January 2018. 
  50. ^ Polygon staff (18 December 2017). "The 50 best games of 2017". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 21 January 2018. Retrieved 12 February 2018. 
  51. ^ Whitney, Kayla (25 January 2018). "Complete list of winners of the New York Game Awards 2018". AXS. Archived from the original on 27 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018. 
  52. ^ Makuch, Eddie (14 January 2018). "Game Of The Year Nominees Announced For DICE Award". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 17 January 2018. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  53. ^ Makuch, Eddie (22 February 2018). "Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Wins Game Of The Year At DICE Awards". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 23 February 2018. Retrieved 24 February 2018. 
  54. ^ "Nominee List for 2017". National Academy of Video Game Trade Reviewers. 9 February 2018. Archived from the original on 15 February 2018. Retrieved 15 February 2018. 
  55. ^ "Horizon wins 7; Mario GOTY". National Academy of Video Game Trade Reviewers. 13 March 2018. Archived from the original on 14 March 2018. Retrieved 14 March 2018. 

External links[edit]