Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church

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Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church
Metropolitan AME Church, DC.jpg
Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church is located in Central Washington, D.C.
Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church
Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church is located in the District of Columbia
Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church
Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church is located in the US
Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church
Location 1518 M Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.
Coordinates 38°54′19″N 77°2′9″W / 38.90528°N 77.03583°W / 38.90528; -77.03583Coordinates: 38°54′19″N 77°2′9″W / 38.90528°N 77.03583°W / 38.90528; -77.03583
Area 0.3 acres (0.12 ha)
Built 1886
Architect Samuel G. T. Morsell
Architectural style Gothic Revival
NRHP Reference # 73002102[1]
Added to NRHP July 26, 1973

Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church ("Metropolitan AME Church") is a historic church located at 1518 M Street, N.W., in downtown Washington, D.C. It affiliates with the African Methodist Episcopal Church religious denomination.

The congregation was founded in 1838 as Union Bethel (Metropolitan) A. M. E. Church. In 1880, John W. Stevenson was appointed by Bishop Daniel Payne to be pastor of the church for the purpose of building a new church, which would become Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church. The cornerstone was laid in September, 1881. However, Stevenson's methods were upsetting to some of his congregation, and Stevenson was removed before the building was finished[2] after asking for a salary that was deemed too high.[3] The new building was dedicated on May 30, 1886[4] and was constructed by architect George Dearing.[5] According to the church, it is oldest continuously black-owned property in the original 10-mile parcel of the District.[6] The funerals of abolitionist Frederick Douglass (1895), the first African American U.S. Senator, Blanche Bruce (1898), and civil-rights activist Rosa Parks (2005) were held in the church. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. In May 2010, the National Trust for Historic Preservation added the building to its list of 11 of America's Most Endangered Places due to water damage and other structural problems requiring $11 million in renovations.[6]

U.S. President Barack Obama attended services here on Sunday, January 20, 2013, before his second inauguration.[7]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ Cromwell, John W. "The First Negro Churches in the District of Columbia." The Journal of Negro History 7, no. 1 (1922): p73-75
  3. ^ Pastor Stevenson's Scalp, The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) June 1, 1888, page 1, accessed December 9, 2016 at https://www.newspapers.com/clip/7789148/pastor_stevensons_scalp_the_brooklyn/
  4. ^ Simmons, William J., and Henry McNeal Turner. Men of Mark: Eminent, Progressive and Rising. GM Rewell & Company, 1887. p820-828
  5. ^ "Metropolitan AME Church". nps.gov. Retrieved 7 July 2016. 
  6. ^ a b Ruane, Michael E. (May 19, 2010). "Historic D.C. church lands on most-endangered list". The Washington Post. p. B01. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  7. ^ Harris, Hamil R. (January 20, 2013). "Obamas attend church prior to White House swearing-in". The Washington Post. Image credits: Hamil Harris/TWP. Washington DC: WPC. ISSN 0190-8286. OCLC 464372658. Archived from the original on May 14, 2014. Retrieved May 14, 2014. 

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