Lorimer Street/Metropolitan Avenue (New York City Subway)

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Lorimer Street/Metropolitan Avenue
NYCS-bull-trans-G.svg NYCS-bull-trans-L.svg
New York City Subway rapid transit station complex
Lorimer St L station jeh.JPG
Lorimer Street stair
Station statistics
Address Metropolitan Avenue between Lorimer Street & Union Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11211
Borough Brooklyn
Locale Williamsburg
Coordinates 40°42′46″N 73°57′05″W / 40.712752°N 73.951464°W / 40.712752; -73.951464Coordinates: 40°42′46″N 73°57′05″W / 40.712752°N 73.951464°W / 40.712752; -73.951464
Division BMT/IND.[1]
Line       BMT Canarsie Line
      IND Crosstown Line
Services       G all times (all times)
      L all times (all times)
Transit connections Bus transport NYCT Bus: B24, B48, Q54, Q59
Levels 2
Other information
Opened July 1, 1948; 68 years ago (1948-07-01)
Traffic
Passengers (2015) 5,238,736 (station complex)[2]Increase 2.9%
Rank 89 out of 422

Lorimer Street/Metropolitan Avenue is an underground New York City Subway station complex shared by the BMT Canarsie Line and the IND Crosstown Line. Located in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, the complex is served by the G and L trains at all times.

The BMT Canarsie Line platforms, which are named Lorimer Street, are located above the IND Crosstown Line platforms, which are named Metropolitan Avenue.

Station layout[edit]

G Street Level Entrances/Exits
B1 Side platform, doors will open on the right
Northbound NYCS-bull-trans-L.svg toward Eighth Avenue (Bedford Avenue)
Southbound NYCS-bull-trans-L.svg toward Canarsie–Rockaway Parkway (Graham Avenue)
Side platform, doors will open on the right
B2 Mezzanine to entrances/exits, station agent, MetroCard vending machines
B3 Side platform, doors will open on the right
Northbound NYCS-bull-trans-G.svg toward Court Square (error)
Southbound NYCS-bull-trans-G.svg toward Church Avenue (error)
Side platform, doors will open on the right

The main entrances at the corner of Metropolitan and Union Avenues lead to the transfer passageway between the lines. (A second set of entrances at Metropolitan Avenue and Lorimer Street to the east leads directly to the Canarsie Line platforms.) The L-shaped passageway, located above the Crosstown Line at its northern end and below the Canarsie Line at its western end, also serves as the mezzanine for the Crosstown Line lower level. When viewed from the Crosstown Line mezzanine, the passageway splits up as the right half leads to a ramp for Canarsie-bound trains while the left half leads to a crossunder to Eighth Avenue-bound trains.

Originally, passengers who wished to transfer between the Canarsie and Crosstown lines had to pay a separate fare, because the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (operator of the Canarsie Line) and the Independent Subway System (the Crosstown Line's operator) were competing companies. On July 1, 1948, eight years after the three operators of New York's subways were unified into a single entity, the transfer passageway was reconfigured to be inside fare control, thus permitting free transfers between lines.[1][3]

The station has a total of six closed entrances according to the MTA.[4][5] Two are at the intersection of Union Avenue and Hope/Powers Streets, and two more are at the intersection of Union Avenue and Grand Street.[4]

The 2000 artwork in the transfer passageway and the Crosstown Line mezzanine is called Signs of Life by Jackie Chang. A precinct of the New York City Transit Police is also located on the Crosstown Line mezzanine.

BMT Canarsie Line platforms[edit]

Lorimer Street
NYCS-bull-trans-L.svg
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Lorimer Street BMT IMG 9155.JPG
Station statistics
Division B (BMT)
Line       BMT Canarsie Line
Services       L all times (all times)
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 side platforms
Tracks 2
Other information
Opened June 30, 1924; 92 years ago (1924-06-30)
Station succession
Next north Bedford Avenue: L all times
Next south Graham Avenue: L all times

The Lorimer Street station on the BMT Canarsie Line has two tracks and two side platforms. It opened on June 30, 1924, as part of the initial segment of the underground Canarsie Line, a product of the Dual Contracts, stretching from Sixth Avenue in Manhattan to Montrose Avenue.[6][7]

The Lorimer Street entry point has a mezzanine above the station. There is also another entrance at Union Avenue that leads directly to the Manhattan-bound platform. The transfer to the Crosstown Line is toward the Union Avenue (western; railroad northern) end of the station, where passageways descend from each platform to the Union Avenue mezzanine.

Image gallery[edit]

IND Crosstown Line platforms[edit]

Metropolitan Avenue
NYCS-bull-trans-G.svg
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Metropolitan Av IND sta jeh.JPG
Street stair at southeast corner of Metropolitan & Union Avenues
Station statistics
Division B (IND)
Line       IND Crosstown Line
Services       G all times (all times)
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 side platforms
Tracks 2
Other information
Opened July 1, 1937; 79 years ago (1937-07-01)[8]
Former/other names Metropolitan Avenue–Grand Street
Station succession
Next north Nassau Avenue: G all times
Next south Broadway: G all times

The Metropolitan Avenue station on the IND Crosstown Line opened on July 1, 1937 as part of the extension of the Crosstown Line from Nassau Avenue to Hoyt-Schermerhorn Streets.[8] The station also has two tracks and two side platforms.[9] Station tile signage retains the original name of the station: Metropolitan Avenue–Grand Street. IND icon tiles indicate "To Street and Transfer."[10] Two staircases from the north end of either platform lead to the mezzanine and transfer passageway to the BMT Canarsie Line.[9][11] The mezzanine is full-length, but the central and south portions are closed to the public, used as a police facility and as employee space and offices.[10] Exits from the closed mezzanine lead to both northern corners of Union, Hope, and Powers Street, and to at least one corner of Grand Street and Union Avenue. These exits are sealed with metal street grates.[10][4][12]

Image gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Transfer Points Under Higher Fare: Board of Transportation Lists Stations and Intersections for Combined Rides". New York Times. June 30, 1948. p. 19. Retrieved May 5, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership". New York: Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved 2016-04-19. 
  3. ^ Sparberg, Andrew J. (2014-10-01). From a Nickel to a Token: The Journey from Board of Transportation to MTA. Fordham University Press. ISBN 9780823261901. 
  4. ^ a b c Hogan, Gwynne (February 29, 2016). "Open Shuttered Subway Entrances Before L Train Shutdown, Advocates Urge". DNAinfo.com. Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Retrieved 5 July 2016. 
  5. ^ "Closed subway entrances". WNYC (AM). October 31, 2015. Retrieved 4 July 2016. 
  6. ^ "Subway Tunnel Through". The New York Times. August 8, 1919. Retrieved February 28, 2010. 
  7. ^ "Celebrate Opening of Subway Link". The New York Times. July 1, 1924. Retrieved February 13, 2010. 
  8. ^ a b "New Crosstown Subway Line Is Opened". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 1, 1937. Retrieved 24 December 2015. 
  9. ^ a b "Review of the G Line: Appendices" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority (New York). July 10, 2013. Retrieved 28 October 2015. 
  10. ^ a b c Kabak, Benjamin (January 24, 2013). "Inside Metropolitan Avenue's shuttered G passageway". Second Avenue Sagas. Retrieved 5 July 2016. 
  11. ^ "Review of the G Line" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transit Authority (New York). July 10, 2013. Retrieved August 2, 2015. 
  12. ^ Harshbarger, Rebecca (November 1, 2015). "NYC subway station entrances closed despite ridership spike: over one in four". AM New York. Retrieved 5 July 2016. 

External links[edit]