Mewa Singh

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Mewa Singh (born 11 April 1951 in Maler Kotla), is an Indian primatologist,[1][2] ethologist, and conservation biologist.[3][4] He is a professor of ecology and animal behavior at University of Mysore Biopsychology Department in Mysore, Karnataka.[5][6]

A new night frog Nyctibatrachus mewasinghi has been named after him which is endemic to the Western Ghats. It is generally referred to as Mewa Singh's Night frog.[7]

Singh's research centers on primate social behavior, including conflict resolution, cooperation, inequity aversion, and food-sharing. He is the author of the book Primate Societies and co-author of Macaque Societies: A Model for the Study of Social Organization. He has published more than 100 research articles on several animal species.[8][9] Singh also studies the viability of primate populations[10] and is frequently quoted in the media as an expert in this area.[11][12]

He is a fellow of all three Science Academies of India: Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore; Indian National Science Academy New Delhi; National Academy of Sciences Allahabad.[13] He is also a Ramanna Fellow, DST and a Fellow of the National Academy of Psychology, India.

References[edit]

[14]

  1. ^ Leading the way in Wildlife Education | The Wildlife Society News Wildliffe. Archived 14 August 2014 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "These Intense Photos of Lion-Tailed Macaques Will Turn You Into a Conservationist". By Trisha Gupta, Smithsonian Magazine
  3. ^ "Look who calls the shots!". The Hindu. Akila Kannadasan. 26 July 2013
  4. ^ "Prof. Mewa Singh To Continue Research Work Even After Retirement". Star of Mysore (Mysore, India) 26 May 2013
  5. ^ Mysore University yet to get a permanent vice-chancellor - The Times of India
  6. ^ "Hanuman langurs not one species, at least 3". Telegraph India, G.S. MUDUR
  7. ^ Reporter, Staff (30 December 2017). "Malabar sanctuary home to new night frog species". The Hindu. ISSN 0971-751X. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  8. ^ Misra (1 September 2009). Psychology In India, Volume I: Basic Psychological Processes And Human Development. Pearson Education India. pp. 32–. ISBN 978-81-317-1744-8.
  9. ^ "A Reprieve for the Wolves of Maidenahalli". Conservation India. by Sanjay Gubbi
  10. ^ "Slow growth among lion-tailed macaques may lead to loss of genetic diversity". The Hindu.
  11. ^ "Monkeys common no more". Down to Earth.
  12. ^ "My Husband and Other Animals - Feckless farmers". The Hindu. JANAKI LENIN. 4 August 2010
  13. ^ The Hindu : Karnataka / Mysore News : Honour for Mysore professor
  14. ^ 'Education System Does not Foster the Spirit of Inquiry'. The Indian Express.

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