Mexico City Metro Line 2

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Line 2 / Línea 2
MetroDF Línea 2.svg
Metro Interior.jpg
Inside a train on Line 2
Overview
TypeRapid transit
SystemMexico City Metro
LocaleMexico City
TerminiMetro Cuatro Caminos
Metro Tasqueña
Stations24
Ridership768,292 passengers per day (2016)[1]
Operation
OpenedAugust 1, 1970
Operator(s)Sistema de Transporte Colectivo (STC)
Rolling stock45 NM-02 trains made by Bombardier México in 2004
Technical
Line length20.713 km (13 mi)
Track length23.431 km (15 mi)
Track gauge1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge
ElectrificationThird rail
Operating speed36 km/h (22 mph)
Route map

Cuatro Caminos
Panteones
Tacuba
Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 7
Cuitláhuac
Popotla
Colegio Militar
Normal
San Cosme
Revolución
Hidalgo
Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 3
Bellas Artes
Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 8
Allende
Zócalo
Pino Suárez
Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 1
San Antonio Abad
Chabacano
Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 8 Mexico City Metro Line 9
Viaducto
Xola
Villa de Cortés
Nativitas
Portales
Ermita
Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 12
General Anaya
Tasqueña
Xochimilco Light Rail

Line 2 is one of the 12 lines of the Mexico City Metro.[2]

The 2 Line is the second oldest in the network, identified by the color blue and runs from West to East and then North to South, turning at the city center. It starts at the border of the city with Estado de México and ends South of the city.

General information[edit]

Line 2 connects with Line 7 at Tacuba, Line 3 at Hidalgo, Line 8 at Bellas Artes, Line 1 at Pino Suárez, Lines 8 and 9 at Chabacano and Line 12 at Ermita. It is linked with the Mexico City Light Rail to Xochimilco at the Tasqueña terminal. It used to be served by NC-82 and some NM-83 trains.

It runs under the following roads: Calzada San Bartolo Naucalpan in the stretch from Cuatro Caminos to Panteones, Calzada México-Tacuba from Panteones to Normal, Av. Ribera de San Cosme, Av. Puente de Alvarado from Revolución to Hidalgo, Av. Hidalgo from Hidalgo to Bellas Artes, Tacuba street, República de Guatemala street, José María Pino Suárez street from Zócalo to Pino Suárez. From San Antonio Abad it runs at ground level over Calzada San Antonio Abad and Calzada de Tlalpan till the terminus of the line in Tasqueña.

This line was temporarily served by an NM-02 train printed with landscapes and images of Mexico City.

History[edit]

Line 2 opened on August 1, 1970, in the stretch TasqueñaPino Suárez. Pino Suárez station became the first transfer station of the Mexico City Metro, connecting with Line 1, built one year before.

That same year, the line was expanded towards Tacuba station.

The last expansion of the line occurred in 1984 when two more stations were built: Panteones and Cuatro Caminos, the latter being the first station of the system to serve the State of Mexico. Cuatro Caminos would remain as the only station to serve the suburbs of Mexico City till 1991, when Line A opened and service reached the municipality of Los Reyes La Paz, in the southeastern part of the State of Mexico.

1975 train crash[edit]

This line has seen the worst accident in Mexico City history when on October 20, 1975 when there was a crash between two trains at Metro Viaducto. One train was parked at the station picking up passengers when it was hit by another train that did not stop in time. 20 people were killed and several wounded. After this accident, automatic traffic lights were installed in all lines.

Chronology[edit]

Rolling stock[edit]

Line 2 has had different types of rolling stock throughout the years.

Currently, out of the 390 trains in the Mexico City Metro network, 40 are in service in Line 2.[3]

Station list[edit]

No. Station Date opened Level Distance (km) Transfers Location
Between
stations
Total
01 Cuatro Caminos August 22, 1984 Underground,
trench.
- 0.0
  • CETRAM (Bus platforms) for Naucalpan and Tlalnepantla
  • Naucalpan State of Mexico
    02 Panteones August 22, 1984 Underground,
    trench.
    1.8 1.8   Miguel Hidalgo Mexico City
    03 Tacuba September 14, 1970 Underground,
    trench.
    1.6 3.4
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 7
  • CETRAM (Bus platforms) for Naucalpan and Tlalnepantla
  • 04 Cuitláhuac September 14, 1970 Underground,
    trench.
    0.7 4.1
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line I
  • 05 Popotla September 14, 1970 Underground,
    trench.
    0.8 4.9  
    06 Colegio Militar September 14, 1970 Underground,
    trench.
    0.6 5.5  
    07 Normal September 14, 1970 Underground,
    trench.
    0.7 6.2  
    08 San Cosme September 14, 1970 Underground,
    trench.
    0.8 7.0   Cuauhtemoc
    09 Revolución September 14, 1970 Underground,
    trench.
    0.8 7.0
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 1.svg Metrobús Line 1
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 4.svg Metrobús Line 4
  • 10 Hidalgo September 14, 1970 Underground,
    trench.
    0.7 7.7
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 3
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 3.svg Metrobús Line 3
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 4.svg Metrobús Line 4 (North route)
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 7.svg Metrobús Line 7
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line LL
  • 11 Bellas Artes September 14, 1970 Underground,
    trench.
    0.6 8.3
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 8
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 4.svg Metrobús Line 4 (North route)
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Cero Emissions Corridor Line A
  • 12 Allende September 14, 1970 Underground,
    trench.
    0.5 8.8  
    13 Zócalo September 14, 1970 Underground,
    two-story trench.
    0.8 9.5
  • Pino Suárez Station
  • 14 Pino Suárez August 1, 1970 Underground,
    trench (Lv. -2).
    0.9 10.4
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 1
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 4.svg Metrobús Line 4 (South route)
  • Zócalo Station
  • 15 San Antonio Abad August 1, 1970 Ground-level 1.0 11.4
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Cero Emissions Corridor Line S (at distance)
  • 16 Chabacano August 1, 1970[* 1] Ground-level 0.8 12.2
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 8
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 9
  • 17 Viaducto August 1, 1970 Ground-level 0.9 13.1   Benito Juárez
    18 Xola August 1, 1970 Ground-level 0.6 13.8
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 2.svg Metrobús Line 2 (at distance)
  • 19 Villa de Cortes August 1, 1970 Ground-level 0.8 14.6  
    20 Nativitas August 1, 1970 Ground-level 0.9 15.5  
    21 Portales August 1, 1970 Ground-level 1.1 16.5  
    22 Ermita August 1, 1970 Ground-level 0.9 17.5
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 12
  • 23 General Anaya August 1, 1970 Ground-level 1.0 18.47   Coyoacán
    24 Tasqueña August 1, 1970 Ground-level 1.5 19.9
  • STE logo.jpg DFGGH.JPG Light Rail Line 1
  • South Bus Terminal for Mexico cities.
  • CETRAM (Bus platforms) for Coyoacán and Xochimilco.
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Cero Emissions Corridor Line A (at distance)
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line K (at distance)
    1. ^ Chabacano Line 2 was rebuilt as part of the introduction of Line 9 in 1988 to support three-line transfer with middle-platform solution (Line 8 was built in 1994).

    Tourism[edit]

    Line 2 passes near several places of interest:

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    1. ^ http://metro.cdmx.gob.mx/operacion/mas-informacion/afluencia-de-estacion-por-linea/afluencia-de-estacion-por-linea-2016
    2. ^ Archambault, Richard. "Metro Line 2 » Mexico City Metro System". Retrieved 9 August 2011.
    3. ^ http://www.metro.cdmx.gob.mx/operacion/parque-vehicular Parque vehicular (Rolling stock)