Mexico City Metro Line B

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Line B / Línea B
MetroDF Línea B.svg
Metro Mexico DF MP68 R93 01.jpg
Overview
TypeRapid transit
SystemMexico City Metro
LocaleMexico City
TerminiMetro Ciudad Azteca
Metro Buenavista
Stations21
Ridership1,259,942 passengers per day (2017)[1]
Operation
OpenedDecember 15, 1999[2]
Operator(s)Sistema de Transporte Colectivo (STC)
Rolling stockMP-68
Technical
Line length20.278 km (13 mi)
Track length23.722 km (15 mi)
Track gauge1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge
Route map

Ciudad Azteca
Plaza Aragón
Olímpica
Ecatepec
Múzquiz
Río de los Remedios
Impulsora
Nezahualcóyotl
Villa de Aragón
Bosque de Aragón
Deportivo Oceanía
Oceanía
Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 5
Romero Rubio
Ricardo Flores Magón
San Lázaro
Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 1
Morelos
Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 4
Tepito
Lagunilla
Garibaldi / Lagunilla
Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 8
Guerrero
Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 3
Buenavista
Ferrocarril Suburbano.svg FS1.png

Mexico City Metro Line B is one of the twelve metro lines operating in Mexico City, Mexico. It has 21 stations and a total length of 23.722 km, 20.278 km service the line while the rest are used for maneuvers.

Line B runs from downtown Mexico City north towards the municipality of Ecatepec de Morelos.

Currently, it is the only line in the whole metro network to use two distinctive colors: green and gray.

Alongside Line 12, Line B is one of the two metro lines of the network to have the three type of stations: underground, elevated and surface.

History[edit]

Line B was planned as a feeder line that would connect Mexico City to the adjacent municipalities of the State of Mexico, such as Ecatepec de Morelos and Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl, therefore, instead of using the same numbering system as with the other metro lines, the line was named as Line B, same as in Line A, which connects Mexico City with the municipality of La Paz, also in the State of Mexico.

The first stretch of the line, from Buenavista to Villa de Aragón, was inaugurated on December 15, 1999 by Ernesto Zedillo, President of Mexico from 1994 to 2000, and Rosario Robles, Head of Government of the Federal District from 1991 to 2000. The second section, from Villa de Aragón to Ciudad Azteca, was opened on November 30, 2000, six years after it was planned.[3]

Chronology[edit]

Rolling stock[edit]

Currently, out of the 390 trains in the Mexico City Metro network, 36 are in service in Line B.[4]

Station list[edit]

No. Station Date opened Level Distance (km) Transfers Location
Between
stations
Total
01 Ciudad Azteca November 30, 2000 Surface - 0.0
  • Mexibús Line 1
  • CETRAM (Bus platforms) for Ecatepec and Coacalco
  • Ecatepec de Morelos
    02 Plaza Aragón November 30, 2000 Surface 0.7 0.7
    03 Olímpica November 30, 2000 Surface 0.9 1.6
    04 Ecatepec November 30, 2000 Surface 0.7 2.3
    05 Múzquiz November 30, 2000 Surface 1.6 3.9
    06 Río de los Remedios November 30, 2000 Surface 1.3 5.2
  • CETRAM (Bus platforms) for Ecatepec
  • 07 Impulsora November 30, 2000 Surface 0.6 5.8
    08 Nezahualcóyotl November 30, 2000 Surface 1.5 7.3
    09 Villa de Aragón December 15, 1999 Surface 1.5 8.8
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 6.svg Metrobús Line 6
  • Gustavo A. Madero
    10 Bosque de Aragón December 15, 1999 Surface 0.9 9.7
    11 Deportivo Oceanía December 15, 1999 Surface 1.3 11.0
    12 Oceanía December 15, 1999 Elevated 1.0 12.0
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 5
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line G
  • 13 Romero Rubio December 15, 1999 Elevated 1.0 13.0 Venustiano Carranza
    14 Ricardo Flores Magón December 15, 1999 Elevated 1.1 14.1
    15 San Lázaro December 15, 1999 Elevated 1.1 15.2
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 1
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 4.svg Metrobús Line 4
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 5.svg Metrobús Line 5
  • East Bus Terminal (TAPO) for Mexico eastern cities.
  • CETRAM (Bus platforms) for city-east.
  • 16 Morelos December 15, 1999 Underground,
    trench
    1.4 16.6
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 4
  • 17 Tepito December 15, 1999 Underground,
    trench
    0.6 17.2 Cuauhtémoc
    18 Lagunilla December 15, 1999 Underground,
    trench
    0.8 18.0
    19 Garibaldi / Lagunilla December 15, 1999 Underground,
    trench
    0.6 18.6
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line B
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 7.svg Metrobús Line 7
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line LL
  • 20 Guerrero December 15, 1999 Underground,
    trench
    0.9 19.5
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 3
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 3.svg Metrobús Line 3
  • 21 Buenavista December 15, 1999 Underground,
    trench
    0.7 20.2
  • Ferrocarril Suburbano.svg FS1.png Suburban Rail Line 1
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 1.svg Metrobús Line 1
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 3.svg Metrobús Line 3
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Metrobús de la Ciudad de México Ruta 4.svg Metrobús Line 4
  • CETRAM (bus platforms) for city-west
  • Major Ecobici hub
  • Renamed stations[edit]

    Date Old name New name
    2002 Continentes Nezahualcóyotl
    2008 Tecnológico Ecatepec

    Tourism[edit]

    Line B passes near several places of interest:

    Crime[edit]

    On its route, Line B passes through some places infamous for their considerable levels of crime including Ecatepec de Morelos, Gustavo A. Madero, Venustiano and neighborhoods such as Tepito and Colonia Morelos.[5] Due to this, the line has a high rate of crime inside the stations and the trains, going from the presence of pickpockets and petty theft, to armed robbery and sexual assault.[5]

    In 2017, at least three violent robberies were reported, in which armed men entered the wagons and stripped the passengers out of their belongings.[5][6]

    References[edit]

    1. ^ http://metro.cdmx.gob.mx/operacion/mas-informacion/afluencia-de-estacion-por-linea/afluencia-de-estacion-por-linea-2017
    2. ^ http://www.metro.cdmx.gob.mx/la-red/linea-B
    3. ^ "Abrirán el tres días la línea B". El Universal (in Spanish). November 27, 2000. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
    4. ^ http://www.metro.cdmx.gob.mx/operacion/parque-vehicular Parque vehicular (Rolling stock)
    5. ^ a b c "Línea B del Metro, asaltos y acoso, el pan de todos los días". La Silla Rota (in Spanish). November 20, 2017. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
    6. ^ "Hombres armados asaltan vagón de mujeres en la Línea B del Metro". La Prensa (in Spanish). July 26, 2017. Retrieved August 13, 2018.

    See also[edit]