Mexico men's national basketball team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Mexico
Ademeba logo.svg
FIBA ranking31 Decrease 8 (18 September 2022)[1]
Joined FIBA1933
FIBA zoneFIBA Americas
National federationAsociación Deportiva Mexicana de Básquetbol
CoachOmar Quintero
Nickname(s)12 Guerreros
Olympic Games
Appearances5
MedalsBronze medal.svg Bronze: (1936)
FIBA World Cup
Appearances10
MedalsNone
FIBA AmeriCup
Appearances15
MedalsGold medal america.svg Gold: (2013)
Bronze medal america.svg Bronze: (2017)
Kit body redsides.png
First jersey
Kit shorts redsides.png
Team colours
First
Kit body greensides.png
Second jersey
Kit shorts redsides.png
Team colours
Second
Kit body greensides.png
Third jersey
Kit shorts greensides.png
Team colours
Third

The Mexico national basketball team (Spanish: Selección de baloncesto de México) represents Mexico in men's international basketball competitions, The team has made five appearances in FIBA World Cup, The governing body of the team is the Asociación Deportiva Mexicana de Básquetbol (ADEMEBA).

In 2013, Mexico won the FIBA AmeriCup.

History[edit]

Fans of Team Mexico at the 2014 Basketball World Cup
Team Mexico celebrating a victory.

Until the late 1960s, team Mexico was a major force at the world stage. The team won the bronze medal at the 1936 Summer Olympics, finished 4th at the 1948 event and 5th in 1968. Mexico won the Pan American Games silver medal in Winnipeg 1967 led by Captain Carlos Quintanar with players like Arturo Guerrero and Manuel Raga.

At the FIBA Americas Championship 2009 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Mexico finished 7th, ahead of Panama, Venezuela and the United States Virgin Islands.[2]

On individual performances, Gustavo Ayon finished among the tournament's top performers in steals (3rd), blocks (3rd) and minutes per game (9th).[3]

Both Eduardo Nájera and Earl Watson expressed their interest in representing Mexico internationally.[4][5] However, neither received permission by their NBA teams to participate at the FIBA Americas Championship 2009 in San Juan, Puerto Rico.[6]

Mexico Beats Team USA[edit]

On October 29, 2011, Mexico defeated Team USA 71-55. This 16 point victory took place during the 2011 Pan Am Games.[7]

"La Edad de Oro" (2013–Present)[edit]

Mexico took part in the FIBA Americas Championship 2013 to replace Panama, who were disqualified. To the surprise of many they beat hosts Venezuela in their opening game, and advanced to the second round with wins over Paraguay and the Dominican Republic. They later finished top of the eight-team second round group and a semi-final win over heavy favourites Argentina saw them through to the final.

On 11 September 2013, they beat Puerto Rico 91-83 in the gold medal game to win the FIBA Americas Championship.[8] Inside player Gustavo Ayon was voted as the tournament's Most Valuable Player.

2014 Basketball World Cup[edit]

The surprising gold medal at the 2013 FIBA Americas Championship secured Mexico a spot at the 2014 FIBA World Cup in Spain. This marked the first qualification to the Basketball World Cup in 40 years.[9]

At the 2014 FIBA World Cup, the Mexicans won two of their five preliminary round games against Korea and Angola which earned them a playoff spot for the first time in their history. They would, however, come unstuck against eventual champions USA.

Especially noteworthy was Mexico’s 3 point field goal percentage, which was one of the highest among all the teams at the event.[10]

2015 FIBA Americas Championship[edit]

Due to Mexico's strong performances of late, the country gained the right to host the 2015 FIBA Americas Championship.

Mexico Defeats Team USA Again[edit]

On June 28, 2018, Mexico defeated Team USA 78–70 during the 2019 FIBA Basketball World Cup Qualifiers. Mexico was led by Gustavo Ayon and Juan Toscano-Anderson. Team USA was led by Alex Caruso, David Stockton, and coached by Jeff Van Gundy.[11]

On November 19, 2021, Mexico defeated Team USA 97–88 during the 2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup Qualifiers. Mexico was led by Orlando Méndez-Valdez (who was also part of Mexico's victory over Team USA in 2018) and Team USA was led by Isaiah Thomas and Luke Kornet.[12]

On September 2, 2022, Mexico defeated Team USA 73–67 during the 2022 FIBA AmeriCup in Recife, Brazil. Mexico was led by Paul Stoll and Fabian Jaimes. Team USA was led by Jodie Meeks, Patrick McCaw, Frank Mason III, and Norris Cole.[13]

Medals[edit]

Olympic Games[edit]

FIBA AmeriCup[edit]

Pan American Games[edit]

Centrobasket[edit]

Competition 1st place, gold medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Total
Olympic Games 0 0 1 1
FIBA AmeriCup 1 0 1 2
Pan American Games 0 3 1 4
Centrobasket 3 3 2 8
Total 4 6 5 15

Other awards[edit]

FIBA COCABA Championship[edit]

William Jones Cup[edit]

Central American and Caribbean Games[edit]

FIBA Stanković Continental Champions' Cup[edit]

Competitive record[edit]

Summer Olympics[edit]

Year Position Tournament Host
1936 3 Bronze medal.svg Basketball at the 1936 Summer Olympics Berlin, Germany
1948 4 Basketball at the 1948 Summer Olympics London, United Kingdom
1952 9 Basketball at the 1952 Summer Olympics Helsinki, Finland
1960 12 Basketball at the 1960 Summer Olympics Rome, Italy
1964 12 Basketball at the 1964 Summer Olympics Tokyo, Japan
1968 5 Basketball at the 1968 Summer Olympics Mexico City, Mexico
1976 10 Basketball at the 1976 Summer Olympics Montreal, Canada

FIBA World Olympic Qualifying Tournament[edit]

Year Position Pld W L
Japan 1964 1st place 9 8 1
Germany 1972 4th place No data
Canada 1976 3rd place No data
Italy 2016 4th place 3 1 2

FIBA World Cup[edit]

Members of the 2014 Team Mexico, which reached the World Cup's playoffs for the first time.
Year Position Tournament Host
1959 13 1959 FIBA World Championship Chile
1963 9 1963 FIBA World Championship Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
1967 8 1967 FIBA World Championship Uruguay
1974 9 1974 FIBA World Championship Puerto Rico
2014 14 2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup Spain
2023 To Be Determined 2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup Philippines, Japan and Indonesia

NOTE: In June 2018, Mexico beat Team USA 78-70 in the 2019 FIBA Basketball World Cup qualification (Americas).[14]

FIBA AmeriCup[edit]

Year Position Tournament Host
1980 5 1980 Tournament of the Americas San Juan, Puerto Rico
1984 5 1984 Tournament of the Americas São Paulo, Brazil
1988 6 1988 Tournament of the Americas Montevideo, Uruguay
1989 9 1989 Tournament of the Americas Mexico City, Mexico
1992 7 1992 Tournament of the Americas Portland, United States
1993 1993 Tournament of the Americas San Juan, Puerto Rico
1995 1995 Tournament of the Americas Tucumán, Argentina
1997 10 1997 FIBA Americas Championship Montevideo, Uruguay
1999 1999 FIBA Americas Championship San Juan, Puerto Rico
2001 9 2001 FIBA Americas Championship Neuquén, Argentina
2003 6 2003 FIBA Americas Championship San Juan, Puerto Rico
2005 10 2005 FIBA Americas Championship Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
2007 7 2007 FIBA Americas Championship Las Vegas, United States
2009 7 2009 FIBA Americas Championship San Juan, Puerto Rico
2011 2011 FIBA Americas Championship Mar del Plata, Argentina
2013 1 Gold medal with cup.svg 2013 FIBA Americas Championship Caracas, Venezuela
2015 4 2015 FIBA Americas Championship Mexico City, Mexico
2017 3 Bronze medal with cup.svg 2017 FIBA Americas Championship Argentina, Colombia, Uruguay
2022 6 2022 FIBA AmeriCup Recife, Brazil

Pan American Games[edit]

  • 1951 – 8th place
  • 1955 – 4th place
  • 1959 – 4th place
  • 1963 – 7th place
  • 1967Silver medal Med 2.png (Mexico finished second only to Team USA. Team Mexico featured one of the 50 Greatest EuroLeague Contributors: Manuel Raga)[15]
  • 1971 – 4th place
  • 1975 – 4th place
  • 1979 – 8th place
  • 1983Bronze medal Med 3.png (This competition was memorable for Mexico taking a 20–4 lead against a Team USA squadron that featured Michael Jordan, Chris Mullin, Sam Perkins, Michael Cage, Ed Pinckney, Mark Price, and Wayman Tisdale. Team USA later came back for an 11-point win: 74–63. Team USA won the gold, Brazil won the silver, and Mexico beat Canada for the bronze medal.)[16]
  • 1987 – 4th place
  • 1991Silver medal Med 2.png (Mexico finished ahead of a Team USA squadron that featured Grant Hill, Christian Laettner, Thomas Hill, Walt Williams, Clarence Weatherspoon, Tracey Murray, Jimmy Jackson, Terry Dehere, Adam Keefe, Eric Montross, and Tony Bennett. Puerto Rico won the gold, Mexico won the silver, and Team USA won the bronze medal.)[17]
  • 1995 – 5th place
  • 2003 – 5th place
  • 2011Silver medal Med 2.png (Mexico beat Team USA 71–55 in their semifinal game.)[18]
  • 2015 – 8th place
  • 2019 – 7th place

Centrobasket – Central American Championships[edit]

Román Martínez and Marco Ramos helped Mexico secure the gold medal at the 2014 Centrobasket
  • 1965 – Gold Medal Med 1.png (Team Mexico featured one of the 50 Greatest EuroLeague Contributors: Manuel Raga)
  • 1967 – 4th place
  • 1975 – Gold Medal Med 1.png
  • 1987 – Bronze Medal Med 3.png
  • 1989 – 4th place
  • 1991 – Silver Medal Med 2.png
  • 1997 – 4th place
  • 2001 – Silver Medal Med 2.png
  • 2003 – Bronze Medal Med 3.png[19]
  • 2004 – 4th place
  • 2006 – 4th place
  • 2008 – 5th place (Coach Nolan Richardson)
  • 2010 – 6th place
  • 2014 – Gold Medal Med 1.png
  • 2016 – Silver Medal Med 2.png

FIBA COCABA Championship[edit]

  • 2006 – Champions Med 1.png[20]
  • 2007 – Champions Med 1.png[21]
  • 2009 – Champions Med 1.png[22] (Coach: Nolan Richardson)
  • 2013 – Champions Med 1.png[22]
  • 2015 – 4th place

William Jones Cup[edit]

  • 1990 – Champions Med 1.png (2nd place = Poland, 3rd place = USA)

Central American and Caribbean Games[edit]

  • 2010 – Silver medal Med 2.png
  • 2014 – 5th place

FIBA Stanković Continental Champions' Cup[edit]

  • 2015 – Silver medal Med 2.png

Team[edit]

Current roster[edit]

The roster for the 2022 FIBA AmeriCup.[23]

Mexico men's national basketball team – 2022 FIBA AmeriCup roster
Players Coaches
Pos. No. Name Age – Date of birth Height Club Ctr.
SF 2 Yahir Bonilla 19 – (2003-02-26)26 February 2003 2.04 m (6 ft 8 in) Barcelona Spain
F 3 Fabián Jaimes 29 – (1992-09-22)22 September 1992 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) Panteras de Aguascalientes Mexico
PG 4 Paul Stoll (C) 36 – (1985-12-04)4 December 1985 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) Fuerza Regia Mexico
F 5 Irwin Ávalos 31 – (1991-06-13)13 June 1991 2.01 m (6 ft 7 in) Libertadores de Querétaro Mexico
PG 8 Diego Willis 23 – (1999-05-11)11 May 1999 1.94 m (6 ft 4 in) Libertadores de Querétaro Mexico
SF 10 Gabriel Girón 34 – (1988-02-27)27 February 1988 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) Fuerza Regia Mexico
PG 11 Santiago Ochoa 18 – (2004-01-02)2 January 2004 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in) HD Toros of San Antonio United States
PF 12 Héctor Hernández 37 – (1985-01-15)15 January 1985 2.05 m (6 ft 9 in) Capitanes Mexico
SG 16 Moisés Andriassi 22 – (2000-03-01)1 March 2000 1.77 m (5 ft 10 in) Capitanes Mexico
F 24 Omar De Haro 27 – (1995-05-13)13 May 1995 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in) Astros de Jalisco Mexico
C 25 Israel Gutiérrez 29 – (1993-01-15)15 January 1993 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) Dorados de Chihuahua Mexico
F 44 Daniel Amigo 26 – (1995-09-13)13 September 1995 2.08 m (6 ft 10 in) Libertadores de Querétaro Mexico
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)
  • United States Victor Canales
  • Mexico Gustavo Quintero
Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • Club – describes current
    or most recent club
  • Age – describes age
    on 2 September 2022

Former players[edit]

Mexico men's national basketball team roster
Players Coaches
Pos. No. Name Age – Date of birth Height Club
F Noé Alonzo 31 – (1983-12-28)28 December 1983 2.00 m (6 ft 7 in) Aguacateros de Michoacán Mexico
SF Juan Toscano 22 – (1993-04-10)10 April 1993 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) Los Angeles Lakers United States
PG Brody Angley 35 – (1980-01-30)30 January 1980 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) Bucaneros de La Guaira Venezuela
C Gustavo Ayón (C) 30 – (1985-04-01)1 April 1985 2.07 m (6 ft 9 in) Zenit Russia
G/F Francisco Cruz 25 – (1989-10-03)3 October 1989 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) BK VEF Rīga Latvia
F/C Edgar Garibay 25 – (1990-03-05)5 March 1990 2.11 m (6 ft 11 in) Nauticos de Mazatlan Mexico
F Jordan Glynn 26 – (1989-06-26)26 June 1989 2.00 m (6 ft 7 in) Cangrejeros de Santurce Puerto Rico
SF Jesús González 29 – (1986-07-14)14 July 1986 1.95 m (6 ft 5 in) Halcones Rojos Veracruz Mexico
PG Jorge Gutiérrez 26 – (1988-12-27)27 December 1988 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) Milwaukee Bucks United States
SG Jovan Harris 34 – (1981-02-20)20 February 1981 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) Halcones de Xalapa Mexico
PF Jesus Hiram Lopez 31 – (1983-12-18)18 December 1983 2.05 m (6 ft 9 in) Rayos de Hermosillo Mexico
SF Román Martínez 27 – (1988-03-05)5 March 1988 2.01 m (6 ft 7 in) Soles de Mexicali Mexico
F/C Lorenzo Mata 29 – (1986-02-27)27 February 1986 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) Atenienses de Manatí Puerto Rico
PG Pedro Meza 29 – (1985-10-15)15 October 1985 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in) Caballeros de Culiacán Mexico
C Adam Parada 33 – (1981-10-21)21 October 1981 2.13 m (7 ft 0 in) Halcones de Xalapa Mexico
PG Alex Perez 22 – (1993-01-01)1 January 1993 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) Bucaneros de La Guaira Venezuela
F Marco Ramos 28 – (1987-02-26)26 February 1987 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) Halcones Rojos Veracruz Mexico
PF Ivan Rangel 22 – (1992-10-11)11 October 1992 2.10 m (6 ft 11 in) Oklahoma Wesleyan Eagles United States
SG Carlos Toussaint 23 – (1991-10-24)24 October 1991 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) Pioneros de Los Mochis Mexico
F/C Rodrigo Adrián Zamora 28 – (1986-10-28)28 October 1986 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) Halcones Rojos Veracruz Mexico
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)
  • Mexico Victor Canales
  • Mexico Gustavo Quintero
Legend
  • Club – describes current
    or most recent club
  • Age – describes age
    on 16 July 2022

Depth chart[edit]

Pos. Starting 5 Bench 1 Bench 2 Inactive
C Israel Gutiérrez Gustavo Ayón Adam Parada Edgar Garibay
PF Héctor Hernández Adrián Zamora Lorenzo Mata Jesus Hiram López
SF Francisco Cruz Juan Anderson Marco Ramos Román Martínez
SG Orlando Méndez Gabriel Girón Jesus González Jovan Harris
PG Jorge Gutiérrez Pedro Meza Paul Stoll Carlos Toussaint

Previous squads[edit]

Head coach position[edit]

Kit[edit]

Manufacturer[edit]

2015–: Under Armour

[edit]

2015–: mainbit

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "FIBA Ranking Presented by Nike". FIBA. 18 September 2022. Retrieved 18 September 2022.
  2. ^ "FIBA.com: 2009 FIBA Americas Championship for Men". Puertorico2009.fiba.com. 6 September 2009. Archived from the original on 27 August 2009. Retrieved 26 July 2010.
  3. ^ "FIBA.com: 2009 FIBA Americas Championship for Men Top players". Puertorico2009.fiba.com. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 26 July 2010.
  4. ^ "MEX – Najera reports to Mexican national team". Fiba.com. 13 June 2014.
  5. ^ "HoopsHype – Earl Watson: "I signed with the Pacers because they want to win now"". Blogs.hoopshype.com. 3 August 2009. Archived from the original on 3 October 2011. Retrieved 22 July 2010.
  6. ^ "FIBA.com: 2009 FIBA Americas Championship for Men Team profile". Puertorico2009.fiba.com. Archived from the original on 9 July 2017. Retrieved 22 July 2010.
  7. ^ "USA Basketball: Mexico Ends USA's Pan American Games Gold Medal Quest 71-55". www.usabasketball.com. Archived from the original on 31 October 2011. Retrieved 11 January 2022.
  8. ^ "Spain 2014-bound Mexico are 2013 Americas champions!". FIBA. 12 September 2013. Retrieved 19 September 2013.
  9. ^ "FIBA Archive; Mexico". FIBA. Retrieved 1 October 2014.
  10. ^ "TEAM STATISTICS; TEAM LEADERS". FIBA. Retrieved 2 October 2014.
  11. ^ "Mexico shocks USA Basketball in World Cup qualifying round". NBA.com.
  12. ^ https://www.usnews.com/news/sports/articles/2021-11-29/usa-basketball-falls-in-world-cup-qualifier-to-mexico-97-88[bare URL]
  13. ^ "Mexico v USA boxscore - FIBA AmeriCup 2022 - 2 September".
  14. ^ "Mexico shocks USA Basketball in World Cup qualifying round". NBA.com.
  15. ^ "USA Basketball". USA Basketball. 6 August 1967. Archived from the original on 20 August 2009.
  16. ^ "USA Basketball". USA Basketball. Archived from the original on 6 September 2009.
  17. ^ "USA Basketball". USA Basketball. Archived from the original on 20 August 2009.
  18. ^ "Mexico Ends USA's Pan American Games Gold Medal Quest 71–55". USA Basketball. 29 October 2011. Archived from the original on 31 October 2011.
  19. ^ "Latinbasket – Central American Championships '01". Latinbasket.com.
  20. ^ "LATINBASKET – 5th Tournament of the Americas (Copa America) 2005 Basketball, Teams, Scores, Stats, News, Standings, Pro Basketball". Latinbasket.com.
  21. ^ "LATINBASKET – COCABA – Centro America Championships Basketball, Teams, Scores, Stats, News, Standings, Pro Basketball". Latinbasket.com.
  22. ^ a b "COCABA-Championships Basketball, Teams, Scores, Stats, News, Standings". Latinbasket.
  23. ^ "México arranca su camino en la AmeriCup 2022". vivabasquet.com (in Spanish). 2 September 2022. Retrieved 2 September 2022.
  24. ^ "Team Roster: Mexico" (PDF). fiba.basketball. 2 September 2022. p. 6. Retrieved 2 September 2022.

External links[edit]

Videos[edit]