miR-33

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miR-33a
Mir-33 SS.png
Conserved secondary structure of miR-33a microRNA precursor
Identifiers
Symbol miR-33a
Alt. Symbols mir33a
Rfam RF00667
miRBase MI0000091
miRBase family MIPF0000070
Entrez 407039
HUGO 31634
Other data
RNA type miRNA
Domain(s) Metazoa
GO 0035195
SO 0001244
Locus Chr. 22 q13.2
PDB structures PDBe
miR-33b
Identifiers
Symbol miR-33b
Alt. Symbols mir33b
Rfam RF00667
miRBase MI0003646
miRBase family MIPF0000070
Entrez 693120
HUGO 32791
Other data
RNA type miRNA
Domain(s) Metazoa
GO 0035195
SO 0001244
Locus Chr. 17 13.2
PDB structures PDBe

miR-33 is a family of microRNA precursors, which are processed by the Dicer enzyme to give mature microRNAs.[1] miR-33 is found in several animal species, including humans. In some species there is a single member of this family which gives the mature product mir-33. In humans there are two members of this family called mir-33a and mir-33b, which are located in intronic regions within two protein-coding genes for Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP-2 and SREBP-1) respectively.[2]

Function[edit]

miR-33 plays a role in lipid metabolism; it downregulates a number of ABC transporters, including ABCA1 and ABCG1, which in turn regulate cholesterol and HDL generation.[3][4] Further related roles of miR-33 have been proposed in fatty acid degradation and in macrophage response to low-density lipoprotein.[2] It has been suggested that miR-33a and miR-33b regulates genes Involved in fatty acid metabolism and insulin signalling.[5]

Potential binding sites for mir-33 have been identified in the cDNA of tumour suppressor p53.[6] Further, study has shown that miR-33 is able to repress p53 expression and p53-induced apoptosis. This function is thought to be related to hematopoietic stem cell renewal.[7]

Applications[edit]

miR-33, along with miR-122, could be used to diagnose or treat conditions related to metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease.[2][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ambros, V (2001). "microRNAs: tiny regulators with great potential". Cell. 107 (7): 823–826. doi:10.1016/S0092-8674(01)00616-X. PMID 11779458. 
  2. ^ a b c Najafi-Shoushtari, SH (Jun 2011). "MicroRNAs in cardiometabolic disease". Current atherosclerosis reports. 13 (3): 202–7. doi:10.1007/s11883-011-0179-y. PMID 21461683. 
  3. ^ Fernández-Hernando, C; Suárez, Y; Rayner, KJ; Moore, KJ (Apr 2011). "MicroRNAs in lipid metabolism". Current Opinion in Lipidology. 22 (2): 86–92. doi:10.1097/MOL.0b013e3283428d9d. PMC 3096067Freely accessible. PMID 21178770. 
  4. ^ Moore, KJ; Rayner, KJ; Suárez, Y; Fernández-Hernando, C (Dec 2010). "microRNAs and cholesterol metabolism". Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism. 21 (12): 699–706. doi:10.1016/j.tem.2010.08.008. PMC 2991595Freely accessible. PMID 20880716. 
  5. ^ Dávalos A, Goedeke L, Smibert P, et al. (May 2011). "miR-33a/b contribute to the regulation of fatty acid metabolism and insulin signaling". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 108 (22): 9232–7. doi:10.1073/pnas.1102281108. PMC 3107310Freely accessible. PMID 21576456. 
  6. ^ Herrera-Merchan, A; Cerrato, C; Luengo, G; Dominguez, O; Piris, MA; Serrano, M; Gonzalez, S (Aug 15, 2010). "miR-33-mediated downregulation of p53 controls hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal". Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.). 9 (16): 3277–85. doi:10.4161/cc.9.16.12598. PMID 20703086. 
  7. ^ Fuster, JJ; Andrés, V (Sep 1, 2010). "A role for miR-33 in p53 regulation: New perspectives for hematopoietic stem cell research". Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.). 9 (17): 3397–8. doi:10.4161/cc.9.17.13070. PMID 20861665. 
  8. ^ Najafi-Shoushtari, SH; Kristo, F; Li, Y; Shioda, T; Cohen, DE; Gerszten, RE; Näär, AM (Jun 18, 2010). "MicroRNA-33 and the SREBP host genes cooperate to control cholesterol homeostasis". Science. 328 (5985): 1566–9. doi:10.1126/science.1189123. PMC 3840500Freely accessible. PMID 20466882. 

External links[edit]