Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Department

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Not to be confused with Miami Fire-Rescue Department.
Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Department
MiamiDadeCountyFireDepartmentLogo.JPG

Department Motto

"Always Ready, Proud To Serve"
Operational area
Country  United States
State  Florida
County Miami-Dade
Agency overview
Established 1935
Annual calls 283,572 (2015)
Employees 2500
Staffing Career
Fire chief David Downey
EMS level ALS
IAFF 1403
Facilities and equipment[1]
Divisions 10
Battalions 14
Stations 68
Engines 32
Platforms 2
Ladders 20
Squads 1
Rescues 54
HAZMAT 5
USAR FL TF-1
Airport crash 5
Helicopters 4
Light and air 1
Website

Official website

Facekook website

https://www.facebook.com/MiamiDadeFireRescue/
IAFF website

The Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Department (MDFR) provides fire protection and emergency medical services to the unincorporated parts of Miami-Dade County, Florida along with 30 municipalities located within the county.[2] In all the department is responsible for 1,883 square miles (4,880 km2) of land.

Air Rescue[3][edit]

The Miami-Dade Fire Rescue (MDFR) Air Rescue Bureau provides regional air medical services, search and rescue, aerial firefighting and tactical support to MDFR operations, to those of local municipalities and government agencies at the state and federal level.

MDFR helicopters transport severely injured trauma patients to state approved Level I trauma centers. Flight crews are trained in additional tactical disciplines necessary to deploy personnel and equipment in search and rescue missions, firefighting operations and reconnaissance on large incidents such as wildland fires and catastrophic events.

Current Fleet[edit]

Air Rescue operates four Bell Helicopter 412s (BH 412 EPs). Each aircraft is equipped with the following:

  • Patient loading systems normally configured allow the transport of two critical-care patients, with the option to reconfigure for up to six patients in Mass Casualty Incidents (MCIs).
  • An external hoist for helicopter-borne rescues.
  • An external high-power searchlight, "The Night Sun," is used for night operations.
  • MCI Command and Control suitable radio suite.
  • Night Vision Goggle compatible lighting.

During the dry season, each aircraft can be configured with a Bambi Bucket for firefighting / water-operations.

All four helicopter are housed at MDFR fire stations located at both Miami Executive Airport and Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport.[4]

Urban Search And Rescue (USAR)[edit]

The Miami-Dade Fire Department is the founding member of one of Florida's two FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Task Force.[5] Florida Task Force 1 (FL-TF1) is available to respond to natural or man-made disasters around the county and world and assist with search and rescue, medical support, damage assessment and communications.[6]

History[7]

In the early 1980s two fire departments, Miami-Dade Fire Rescue (at that time known as Metro-Dade Fire Rescue) and the Fairfax County Fire & Rescue Department, operated under an agreement with the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) of the U.S. State Department to provide international search and rescue assistance in times of disaster. During these early years, assistance was provided to the countries of Mexico, Philippines and Soviet Armenia.

In 1991, FEMA incorporated a US&R team concept into a federal response plan. Over 20 teams were geographically chosen throughout the country, with local public safety departments as sponsoring agencies. Today, under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) there are 28 national task forces staffed and equipped to provide 24-hour search and rescue operations following earthquakes, tornadoes, floods, hurricanes and other natural or human-caused disasters.

Responses

  • Earthquakes 1985 Mexico City 1986 El Salvador 1988 Armenia 1990 Philippines 1997 Venezuela 1999 Colombia 1999 Turkey 1999 Taiwan 2010 Haiti
  • Hurricanes / Weather Disasters 1988 Gilbert, Jamaica 1989 Hugo, Eastern Caribbean 1992 Andrew, Miami 1995 Luis, Caribbean 1995 Marilyn, Caribbean 1995 Opal, North Florida 2000 Belize 2004 Charley, Charlotte County, Florida 2005 Katrina, New Orleans, Louisiana 2008 Gustav, Texas 2008 Ike, Miami-Dade County, Florida
  • Flooding/Weather Disasters 2000 Mozambique
  • Building Explosions 1995 Oklahoma City 1996 Columbo, Sri Lanka 1996 Puerto Rico 2001 Pentagon, Washington, D.C. 2001 World Trade Center, New York
  • Airplane Crash 1995-96 Buga, Colombia 1996 ValuJet Crash, Florida
  • Communications Support 1989 Romania 1991 Northern Iraq & Turkey 1994 Rwanda 1994 Haiti 1995 Montserrat 1995 Sierra Leone 1996 Bosnia 1998 Nairobi, Kenya
  • Building Collapse 2007 Barbados, 2012 Doral, FL

Stations and Apparatus[edit]

MDFR Aerial 39

The MDFR has 68 stations split up in 14 battalions.[1]

City Engine Truck EMS Other
1 Miami Lakes Aerial 1 Rescue 1
2 Miami Engine 2 Rescue 2

Rescue 202

Battalion 5
3 Miami Engine 3 Rescue 3 *Red units for 9/11 tribute*
4 Miami Engine 4 Rescue 4 Battalion 9
5 Redland Engine 5 Rescue 5
6 Homestead Tanker 6 Rescue 6
7 West Little River Engine 7 Rescue 7
8 Aventura Engine 8 Rescue 8 Battalion 2
9 Kendall Engine 9 Rescue 9
10 Sunny Isles Beach Ladder 10 Rescue 10
11 Miami Gardens Aerial 11 Rescue 11 Battalion 4
12 Miami International Airport Engine 12 Rescue 12 Battalion 6,

ARFF Foam 1, 2, & 3

Terminal Golf Cart

13 Miami Engine 13 Air Truck 13

South Maintenance Yard

Coms/Ops support vehicles

14 South Miami Engine 14 Rescue 14 Battalion 8
15 Key Biscayne Engine 15 RHIB 15
16 Homestead Engine 16 Rescue 16

Rescue 72

Battalion 10

Brush 1 (UTV) [In old building]

17 Virginia Gardens Ladder 17 HazMat Support 17
19 North Miami Aerial 19 Rescue 19
20 North Miami Engine 20 Rescue 20 Battalion 3
21 Miami Engine 21 Platform 21 Rescue 21 Battalion 1

Fire Boat 21

22 North Miami Ladder 22 Rescue 63
23 Pinecrest Ladder 23 Rescue 23 EMS 23
24 Miami Executive Airport Foam 24

Air Rescue South

25 Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport Foam 25

Air Rescue North

26 Opa-Locka Platform 26 Rescue 26
27 North Bay Village Engine 27 Rescue 27
28 Hialeah Gardens Rescue 28
29 Sweetwater Aerial 29 Rescue 29 Battalion 12
30 Miami Shores Engine 30 Rescue 30
31 North Miami Beach Aerial 31 Rescue 31
32 North Miami Beach Engine 32 Rescue 32
33 Aventura Rescue 33 EMS 33
34 Cutler Ridge Aerial 34

Platform 34

Rescue 34 Rehab

Ops Div Chief South

35 Miami Springs Engine 35 Rescue 35
36 Hammocks Aerial 36 Rescue 36
37 Miami Engine 37 Rescue 37
38 Miami Gardens Aerial 38 Rescue 38
39 Port of Miami Ladder 39 2 RHIBs
40 West Miami Engine 40 Rescue 40
42 Fisher Island Engine 42 Aerial 42 Rescue 42
43 Richmond Heights Aerial 43 Rescue 43 EMS 43

RHIB

44 Palm Springs North Engine 44 Rescue 44
45 Doral Engine 45 Fire Investigators
46 Medley Aerial 46 Collapse Truck
47 Westchester Engine 47 Rescue 47
48 Fontainebleau Engine 48 Rescue 48 EMS 48
49 Pinecrest Rescue 49
50 Perrine Rescue 50
51 Opa-Locka Engine 51 Rescue 51 EMS 51
52 South Miami Heights Tanker 52 Rescue 52 Battalion 7
53 Miami Rescue 53
54 Bunche Park Engine 54 Rescue 54
55 Saga Bay Engine 55 RHIB 55
56 Miami Engine 56 Rescue 56
57 West Kendall Rescue 57 Battalion 13
58 Tamiami Engine 58 Rescue 58
59 Miami International Airport Ladder 59 Quick Response Vehicle (QRV) 59
60 Redland Tanker 60 Airboat 1
61 Miami Engine 61 Brush 2 (UTV)
62 Palmetto Bay Engine 62 Temporary Building
63 Miami Engine 63
64 Miami Lakes Engine 64 Battalion 14
65 Homestead Ladder 65 Rescue 65
66 Homestead Engine 66
67 Arcola *In Construction*
68 TBD *In Construction*
69 Doral Rescue 69 Squad 69

HazMat 69

Battalion 11

70 Coconut Palm Rescue 70
72 TBD
73 Port of Miami Fire Boat 73
76 Bay Harbor Rescue 76
78 Eastern Shores

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Stations & Units". MDFD. Retrieved 29 January 2015. 
  2. ^ "Emergency Response". Miami-Dade Fire Rescue. Retrieved 29 January 2015. 
  3. ^ Services, Miami-Dade County Online. "Air Rescue - Miami-Dade County". www.miamidade.gov. Retrieved 2016-02-21. 
  4. ^ "Air Rescue". Miami-Dade Fire Rescue. Retrieved 29 January 2015. 
  5. ^ "Task Force Locations". FEMA. Retrieved 29 January 2015. 
  6. ^ "Urban Search and Rescue (USAR)". Miami-Dade Fire Department. Retrieved 29 January 2015. 
  7. ^ Services, Miami-Dade County Online. "Urban Search and Rescue (US&R) - Miami-Dade County". www.miamidade.gov. Retrieved 2016-02-21. 

Coordinates: 25°46′N 80°12′W / 25.767°N 80.200°W / 25.767; -80.200