Mibu Domain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Mibu Domain (壬生藩 Mibu han?) was a Japanese domain of the Edo Period. It was associated with Shimotsuke Province in modern-day Tochigi Prefecture.

In the han system, Mibu was a political and economic abstraction based on periodic cadastral surveys and projected agricultural yields.[1] In other words, the domain was defined in terms of kokudaka, not land area.[2] This was different from the feudalism of the West.

History[edit]

During the Boshin War, it was important in the Battle of Utsunomiya.[citation needed]

List of daimyo[edit]

The hereditary daimyo were head of the clan and head of the domain.

  1. Yoshiakira

Chigai-taka-no-ha.jpg Abe clan, 1634-1639 (25,000 koku)[4]

  1. Tadaaki

Japanese Crest Miura mitu Hiki.svg Miura clan, 1639-1691 (25,000 koku)[5]

  1. Masatsugu
  2. Yasutsugu
  3. Akihiro

Maru ni Mitsu Ōgi inverted.png Matsudaira (Nagasawa-Ōkochi) clan, 1692-1695 (fudai; 32,000->42,000 koku)[6]

  1. Terusada
  1. Akihide
  2. Yoshinori

Japanese crest torii.png Torii clan, 1712-1868 (30,000 koku)[8]

  1. Tadateru
  2. Tadaakira
  3. Tadaoki
  4. Tadateru
  5. Tadaakira
  6. Tadahiro
  7. Tadatomi
  8. Tadafumi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Map of Japan, 1789 -- the Han system affected cartography
  1. ^ Mass, Jeffrey P. and William B. Hauser. (1987). The Bakufu in Japanese History, p. 150.
  2. ^ Elison, George and Bardwell L. Smith (1987). Warlords, Artists, & Commoners: Japan in the Sixteenth Century, p. 18.
  3. ^ Papinot, Jacques Edmond Joseph. (1906). Dictionnaire d’histoire et de géographie du Japon; Papinot, (2003). "Hineo" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 9; retrieved 2013-3-31.
  4. ^ Papinot, (2003). "Abe" at p. 1; retrieved 2013-3-31.
  5. ^ Papinot, (2003). "Miura" at pp. 64-65; retrieved 2013-3-31.
  6. ^ Papinot, (2003). "Matsudaira (Nagasawa) at p. 31; Ōkochi" at 46; retrieved 2013-3-31.
  7. ^ Papinot, (2003). "Katō" at p. 20; retrieved 2013-3-31.
  8. ^ Appert, Georges. (1888). "Shimazu" in Ancien Japon, pp. 79; Papinot, (2003). "Torii" at pp. 64-65; retrieved 2013-3-31.

Further reading[edit]

  • Bolitho, Harold. (1974). Treasures among men; the fudai daimyo in Tokugawa Japan. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Kodama Kōta 児玉幸多, Kitajima Masamoto 北島正元 (1966). Kantō no shohan 関東の諸藩. Tokyo: Shin Jinbutsu Ōraisha.

External links[edit]