Michael A. Harrison

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Michael A. Harrison
Born Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A.
Alma mater University of Michigan
Doctoral students Oscar H. Ibarra, James N.Gray,[1] Hervé Gallaire, Mario Schkolnick, Donald Duell, John C. Beatty, Ivan M. Havel, Arnaldo Moura, Walter (Larry) Ruzzo, Matthew M. Geller, Kimberly N. King, Amiram Yehudai, Pehong Chen, Ethan Munson, Wayne Christopher
Known for formal language theory
Website
www.cs.berkeley.edu/~harrison

Michael A. Harrison is a computer scientist, in particular a pioneer in the area of formal languages.

Biography[edit]

Michael A. Harrison (born in Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A.) studied Electrical Engineering and Computing for B.S. and MS, then received a PhD from the University of Michigan in Communication Sciences. He started teaching while a graduate student at Michigan and then joined the faculty of the E.E. Dept at the University of California at Berkeley. He was Assistant Professor from 1963 to 1966, an Associate Professor from 1966 to 1971, and a Full Professor from 1971 to 1994.[2]

In the 1960s, he worked with Sheila Greibach, Gene Rose, Ed Spanier, and Joe Ullian in a research group formed and led by Seymour Ginsburg, dedicated to formal language theory and the foundations of Computer Science. The work that came out of this group distinguished Computer Science theory from other fields. It also brought the field of formal language theory to bear on programming language research.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12] In 1975, he developed the HRU security model (named after its authors Harrison, Ruzzo, Ullman), an operating system level computer security model dealing with the integrity of access rights in the system.[13][14][15][16] With his Ph.D. student Pehong Chen at Berkeley,[17][18][19][20] he founded the "Gain Technology" company (acquired by Sybase in 1992).[21]

Currently, he is Professor Emeritus and also Professor in the Graduate School at Berkeley.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oral History Interview with Jim Gray, Charles Babbage Institute, University of Minnesota. Oral history interview by Philip L. Frana, 3 January 2002, San Francisco, California. Here: p.14
  2. ^ a b Long Vita at Harrison's Home page
  3. ^ Abiteboul, S.; Hull, R.; Vianu, V. (March 2005), "In memory of Seymour Ginsburg, 1928-2004", ACM SIGMOD Record 34 (1) 
  4. ^ Seymour Ginsburg, Sheila A. Greibach, Michael A. Harrison (1967). "One-Way Stack Automata". J. ACM 14 (2): 389–418. doi:10.1145/321386.321403. 
  5. ^ Seymour Ginsburg, Sheila A. Greibach, Michael A. Harrison (1967). "Stack Automata and Compiling". J. ACM 14 (1): 172–201. doi:10.1145/321371.321385. 
  6. ^ Seymour Ginsburg, Michael A. Harrison (1967). "Bracketed Context-Free Languages". J. Comput. Syst. Sci. 1 (1): 1–23. doi:10.1016/s0022-0000(67)80003-5. 
  7. ^ Jim Gray, Michael A. Harrison, Oscar H. Ibarra (1967). "Two-Way Pushdown Automata". Information and Control 11 (1–2): 30–70. doi:10.1016/s0019-9958(67)90369-5. 
  8. ^ Hervé Gallaire, Jim Gray, Michael A. Harrison, Gabor T. Herman (1968). "Infinite Linear Sequential Machines". J. Comput. Syst. Sci. 2 (4): 381–419. 
  9. ^ Michael A. Harrison, Oscar H. Ibarra (1968). "Multi-Tape and Multi-Head Pushdown Automata". Information and Control 13 (5): 433–470. doi:10.1016/s0019-9958(68)90901-7. 
  10. ^ Seymour Ginsburg, Michael A. Harrison (1968). "One-Way Nondeterministic Real-Time List-Storage Languages". J. ACM 15 (3): 428–446. doi:10.1145/321466.321475. 
  11. ^ Seymour Ginsburg, Michael A. Harrison (1968). "On the Elimination of Endmarkers". Information and Control 12 (2): 103–115. doi:10.1016/s0019-9958(68)90221-0. 
  12. ^ Seymour Ginsburg, Michael A. Harrison (1970). "On the Closure of AFL under Reversal". Information and Control 17 (4): 395–409. doi:10.1016/s0019-9958(70)80035-3. 
  13. ^ Michael A. Harrison, Walter L. Ruzzo, Jeffrey D. Ullman (1975). "On Protection in Operating System". Proc. 5th Symp. on Operating System Principles (SOSP). pp. 14–24. 
  14. ^ Michael A. Harrison (1975). "On Models of Protection in Operating Systems". In Jirí Becvár. 4th Symposium on Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science (MFCS). LNCS 32. pp. 46–60. 
  15. ^ Harrison, Michael A.; Ruzzo, Walter L.; Ullman, Jeffrey D. (August 1976). "Protection in Operating Systems". Communications of the ACM 19 (8): 461–471. doi:10.1145/360303.360333. CiteSeerX: 10.1.1.106.7226. 
  16. ^ Michael A. Harrison (1985). "Theoretical Issues Concerning Protection in Operating Systems". Advances in Computers 24: 61–100. doi:10.1016/s0065-2458(08)60365-4. 
  17. ^ Pehong Chen, John Coker, Michael A. Harrison, Jeffrey W. McCarrell, Steve Procter (1986). "The VorTeX Document Preparation Environment". In Jacques Désarménien. 2nd Eur. Conf. on TeX for Scientific Documentation. pp. 45–54. 
  18. ^ Pehong Chen, Michael A. Harrison, Jeffrey W. McCarrell, John Coker, Steve Procter (1986). "An Improved User Environment for TeX". In Jacques Désarménien. 2nd Eur. Conf. on TeX for Scientific Documentation. pp. 32–44. 
  19. ^ Pehong Chen, Michael A. Harrison (1988). "Index Preparation and Processing". Softw., Pract. Exper. 18 (9): 897–915. doi:10.1002/spe.4380180907. 
  20. ^ Pehong Chen, Michael A. Harrison (1988). "Multiple Representation Document Development". IEEE Computer 21 (1): 15–31. doi:10.1109/2.222114. 
  21. ^ Bloomberg Businessweek

External links[edit]