Michael Collins Piper

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Michael Collins Piper
Born Michael Bernard Piper
(1960-07-16)July 16, 1960
Died 2015[1]
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, U.S.
Occupation Author, internet radio host

Michael Collins Piper (July 16, 1960 – 2015)[1] was an American political writer, conspiracy theorist[2] and talk radio host.

He was a regular contributor to the American Free Press, a newspaper backed by Willis Carto noted for its antisemitism, White separatist and White nationalist themes. Piper's books and articles have also been featured by a wide-ranging and eclectic variety of websites, including PressTV, Vanguard News Network and the website of David Duke.[citation needed]

Piper was described on his website as a political "progressive in the LaFollette-Wheeler tradition."[3] He wrote such books as The High Priests of War, in which he criticized the neoconservatives in the Bush administration, and Final Judgment, where he claimed that the Israeli Mossad was responsible for the assassination of U.S. President John F. Kennedy. He had been attacked by many Jewish groups such as the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) of B'nai B'rith, the Simon Wiesenthal Center, and the Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI), some of which labeled Piper as a promoter of antisemitic conspiracy theories and a Holocaust denier.[4]

Piper was found dead from natural causes in a motel room in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho on May 30 or May 31, 2015.[1]

Early life[edit]

Piper claimed his political engagement was inspired by his older brother's experience in the Vietnam War. He once said his late brother "never completely recovered from the physical and psychological impact of the war."[3]

Radio show[edit]

In February 2006, he started a radio show called The Piper Report. Regular guests have included Mark Glenn (leader of Crescent and Cross [clarification needed] and a critic of Judaism), former candidate for Texas state legislature Barbara Samuelson, and Christopher Bollyn (who occasionally filled in for Piper).[citation needed]

Piper has commented about the war on Lebanon, the Mel Gibson affair (in which he derided Gibson for driving under the influence and for apologizing for his statements)[5] and the battle between U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman (D-CT, later I-CT) and businessman Ned Lamont on August 8, 2006. Lamont defeated Lieberman in the Democratic primary, but lost to him in the general election. Piper defended alternative medicine, animal rights and the past activities of Liberty Lobby and Willis Carto. He was featured as a guest on James Edwards' radio show, The Political Cesspool, which has also been accused of promoting anti-Semitism.[6]

Kennedy and King assassination theories[edit]

According to Piper in Final Judgment: The Missing Link in the JFK Assassination Controversy, Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion orchestrated the assassination after learning that Kennedy planned to keep Israel from obtaining nuclear weapons.[7]

Piper claimed the assassination "was a joint enterprise conducted on the highest levels of the CIA, in collaboration with organized crime — and most specifically, with direct and profound involvement by the Israeli intelligence service, the Mossad."[8] He sought to tie in other John F. Kennedy assassination conspiracy theories, primarily involving claims that Jewish mobster Meyer Lansky's organized the hit, and that future president Lyndon B. Johnson staged the event from inside the administration.[citation needed] Piper also alleged that the Jewish organization Anti-Defamation League was linked to the murder. The ADL responded with harsh criticisms, called the claims ridiculous,[9] and denounced Final Judgment as anti-Semitic.[10]

Piper wrote articles in American Free Press which alleged that the Mossad and the FBI conspired to set up the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Piper claims this was motivated by fear of King's anti-Israel statements combined with his massive grassroots power.[citation needed]

Antisemitism controversy[edit]

According to his biography by American First Books, which identifies itself as promoting "white nationalism",[11][12]

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) repeatedly challenged statements made by Piper, and called him a promoter of antisemitic conspiracy theories, a Holocaust denier,[4] and a defender of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. The group says Piper traveled to the United Arab Emirates in 2003 to lecture on anti-Israeli and anti-Semitic themes.[13] In one instance, the ADL stated that Piper had suggested that Israel was working on an "ethnic bomb" targeting only Arabs.[14]

Piper responded to increasing ADL criticism through his 2006 book The Judas Goat, accusing the ADL of using unethical infiltration and information gathering techniques, such as the use of 'agents provocateurs'. He claimed to have begun a series of events that ultimately led to the ADL Files Controversy some years later. Writing in Asia Times, researcher and journalist Keith Bettinger says that Piper's views are "characteristic of an effort by anti-Semites and white supremacists to repackage themselves as 'alternative media voices' claiming to tackle stories the mainstream media in the US won't touch".[15]

Iran[edit]

Piper was an invited to Iran to speak at a Holocaust denial conference in December 2006, and personally met with Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad during his New York City visit to address United Nations General Assembly.[16] His book The New Jerusalem: Zionist Power in America, was on sale at the conference.[17]

Death[edit]

Piper's body was discovered in the last days of May 2015 at the Budget Saver Motel in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. The deputy coroner's report that the cause of death was a "probable Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Cardiomyopathy and Coronary Artery Disease", and listed diabetes as another significant condition. The report indicated that toxicology results were consistent with her findings and that no autopsy was conducted. The article gave Piper's age as 54.[1]

Books[edit]

  • Final Judgment: The Missing Link in the JFK Assassination Conspiracy, American Free Press; (2004), ISBN 978-0974548401
  • Target: Traficant, The Untold Story, American Free Press; (2005); ISBN 978-0981808611

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Jeff Selle and Maureen Dolan. "Death raises questions: Man who died in Cd'A motel was a conspiracy theorist", cdapress.com; accessed July 4, 2015.
  2. ^ "Controversial American Author to Give Talk in Malaysia", Malaysia General News, August 22, 2004.
  3. ^ a b "Biography and Initiatives"", The Piper Report; retrieved 2010-01-21.
  4. ^ a b "College Axes JFK Course", The Guardian (London), August 23, 1997.
  5. ^ Piper on Mel Gibson, mp3.rbnlive.com, August 1, 2006.
  6. ^ "Guest List". Archived from the original on 2008-11-09. Retrieved August 21, 2009. 
  7. ^ Goldwag, Arthur (August 2009). "Conspiracies: The Kennedy Assassinations". Cults, Conspiracies, and Secret Societies: The Straight Scoop on Freemasons, the Illmuniati, Skull & Bones, Black Helicopters, the New World Order, and Many, Many More. New York: Vintage Books. p. 178. ISBN 9780307456663. Retrieved May 15, 2013. 
  8. ^ "College lecturers blame JFK's death on Israelis". Sun Journal (Lewiston, Maine). AP. August 22, 1997. p. 7A. Retrieved May 15, 2013. 
  9. ^ "JFK conspiracy course spurs antisemitism charges", The Dallas Morning News, August 21, 1997.
  10. ^ "Library Won't Shelve This Issue; Patrons Can Appeal to Add, Oust Works", Chicago Tribune, March 2, 2000.
  11. ^ "Why do various forms of nationalism, to include "white nationalism", make good long term business sense for American entrepreneurs", amfir.com; accessed July 4, 2015.
  12. ^ Author Biography America First Books, amfirstbooks.com; accessed July 4, 2015.
  13. ^ Piper on Iran Holocaust conference, adl.org; accessed June 4, 2015.
  14. ^ Piper on Israel: 'preparing an "ethnic bomb"', adl.org; accessed June 4, 2015.
  15. ^ Bettinger, Keith."Anti-Semitism Peddled in Southeast Asia". Asia Times. November 30, 2004. Retrieved March 31, 2012. 
  16. ^ "What Really Happened in Iran", AMERICAN FREE PRESS, January 1 & 8, 2007.
  17. ^ "Iran Opens Conference on Holocaust", The New York Times, December 12, 2006.

External links[edit]