Michael D. Bordo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Michael David Bordo (born 1942 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian economist, currently Board of Governors Professor of Economics and Distinguished Professor of Economics at Rutgers University.[1] He is also a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.[2] He is the third most influential economic historian worldwide according to the RePEc/IDEAS rankings.[3] He was a student of Nobel laureate Milton Friedman and has co-authored numerous books and articles with Anna Schwartz.

Education[edit]

Bordo was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1942. After obtaining a B.A. at McGill University in 1963, Bordo completed an MSc in Economics at the London School of Economics.[4] He went on to the University of Chicago where he obtained a PhD in 1972, working under the supervision of Milton Friedman.

Career and contribution[edit]

From 1981 to 1989, Bordo was Professor of Economics at the University of South Carolina before taking on the role of Professor of Economics at Rutgers University.[5] Bordo is currently Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for Monetary and Financial History at Rutgers University, New Brunswick.[6]

He held many visiting positions at universities worldwide (including University of California-Los Angeles, Princeton, Harvard, Cambridge and the London School of Economics) as well as central banks and international monetary institutions (including the IMF, Federal Reserve Banks of St. Louis, Cleveland, the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, the Bank of Canada, the Bank of England and the Bank for International Settlements).[7] He is a member of the Shadow Open Market Committee, an independent group of economists, who provide a monetarist alternative to the views on monetary policy.

He has been and is on the editorial board of numerous academic journals, including the International Journal of Central Banking, the Journal of International Money and Finance, the Journal of Economic History and Explorations in Economic History. His research focuses mainly on economic and financial history, monetary economics and history of economic thought. He has written extensively on exchange rate regimes such as the Gold Standard and the Bretton Woods system. Another area of expertise is the Great Depression and financial crisis in general. He also researches globalization in historical perspective.

Selected works[edit]

  • A Retrospective on the Classical Gold Standard, 1821-1931, with Anna J. Schwartz, University of Chicago Press, 1984.
  • Money in Historical Perspective, with Anna J. Schwartz, University of Chicago Press, 1987.
  • A Retrospective on the Bretton Woods System: Lessons for International Monetary Reform, with Barry Eichengreen, University of Chicago Press, 1993.
  • The Gold Standard and Related Regimes: Collected Essays, Cambridge University Press, 2005.
  • The Defining Moment: The Great Depression and the American Economy in the Twentieth Century, with Claudia Goldin and Eugene N. White, University of Chicago Press, 2007.
  • The Origins, History, and Future of the Federal Reserve: A Return to Jekyll Island, with William Roberds, Cambridge University Press, 2013.
  • Strained Relations: US Foreign-Exchange Operations and Monetary Policy in the Twentieth Century, with Owen Humpage and Anna J. Schwartz, University of Chicago Press, 2015.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Motovidlak, Dave. "Department of Economics | School of Arts and Sciences - Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey". economics.rutgers.edu. Retrieved 2018-01-10.
  2. ^ "Michael D. Bordo". Hoover Institution. Retrieved 2018-01-10.
  3. ^ Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. "Economics Field Rankings: Business, Economic & Financial History | IDEAS/RePEc". ideas.repec.org. Retrieved 2018-01-10.
  4. ^ "Personal page - Michael Bordo" (PDF).
  5. ^ "Michael D. Bordo". www.nber.org. Retrieved 2018-01-10.
  6. ^ Motovidlak, Dave. "Department of Economics | School of Arts and Sciences - Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey". economics.rutgers.edu. Retrieved 2018-01-10.
  7. ^ Motovidlak, Dave. "Department of Economics | School of Arts and Sciences - Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey". economics.rutgers.edu. Retrieved 2018-01-10.