Michael Dorfman

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Michael Dorfman
Dorwiki.JPG
Michael Dorfman in May 2010
Born (1954-09-17) 17 September 1954 (age 62)
Lviv, Ukraine, USSR
Residence Ukraine, Israel, USA
Citizenship USA, Israel[citation needed]

Michael Dorfman (Ukrainian: Мiхаель Дорфман, Russian: Михаэль Дорфман Hebrew: מיכאל דורפמן‎‎) (born 17 September 1954, Lviv, Ukrainian SSR, USSR) is a writer, essayist, journalist, human rights activist and activist of Yiddish culture revivalist movement.

Author of the 600 articles and essays. Contributor to the Russian language periodical publications in Russia,[1][2][3][4][5][6] Ukraine,[7] Israel,[8][9][10][11] US,[12][13] Belgium,[14] Netherlands,[15] Moldova

Activist of the Yiddish culture revivalist movement among the Russian Jewry.[16] Published three books and about 150 articles in the issue of Yiddish Culture revivalist movement. Among organizers of many festivals and cultural events in Russia and Ukraine.

Started to be published in the Russian Israeli magazine "Kroog" (The Circle) in 1983. In 1992–1999 worked as the publisher and chief-editor of Russian-Israeli newspapers Negev and Aspects, and was a pioneer of printed journalism for local Russian-speaking communities.[17]

In 1994 established the NGO LaMerkhav ('At large' in Hebrew) which dealt with abuse, violence, and discrimination in Israeli public schools. Projects included – a hotline for children, Center for Monitoring Child Abuse, support groups for schoolchildren – victims of hate motivated violence. LaMerkhav also conducted unique projects for developing community leadership for the youth[18]

In 1999 he led an action Russian Panthers[19][unreliable source?] that turned attention of Israeli public to the racism problems of Russian émigré children in public schools[20][unreliable source?]

In 2000–2009 2000–2009 contributed to various human rights and social justice groups in Israel and the territories under Israeli occupation.

Texts of Dorfman recommended in the Russian Jewish Schools Network.[21]

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