Michael Hobbs (rugby union)

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Michael Hobbs
Full name Michael Joseph Deans Hobbs
Date of birth (1987-10-18) 18 October 1987 (age 29)
Place of birth Wellington, New Zealand
Height 1.87 m (6 ft 1 12 in)
Weight 92 kg (203 lb)
School Wellington College
University
Notable relative(s)
Rugby union career
Position(s) First five-eighth
Inside centre
Senior career
Years Team Apps (Points)
2007
2013
2014−
Melbourne Rebels
Panasonic Wild Knights
NTT Docomo Red Hurricanes
8
7
2
(0)
(5)
(0)
Correct as of 19 January 2015
Provincial / State sides
Years Team Apps (Points)
2008, 2011
2012
Wellington
North Harbour
18
4
(23)
(2)
Correct as of 13 October 2012
Super Rugby
Years Team Apps (Points)
2009
2010
2012
Blues
Highlanders
Blues
10
7
14
(7)
(31)
(25)
Correct as of 25 July 2012

Michael Joseph Deans Hobbs (born 18 October 1987) is a professional rugby union player. He currently plays for the NTT Docomo Red Hurricanes in the Japan Top League. Hobbs previously played for the Blues and Highlanders in the Super Rugby competition. He also played for the Wellington Lions in the Air New Zealand Cup. His playing positions are First Five-Eighth and Inside Centre.

Personal life[edit]

Hobbs was born in Wellington, New Zealand and was Head Boy at Wellington College in 2005. He is the son of former All Black Captain and NZ Rugby chairman Jock Hobbs and the nephew of former All Black fullback and Australian rugby union coach Robbie Deans.[2]

Career[edit]

Hobbs represented both New Zealand Schools and New Zealand Under-19s before moving to Brisbane, Australia to undertake study at the University of Queensland. He debuted for the Lions in the 2008 season after spending the two previous years contracted to the Queensland Reds Rugby Academy. He also had a stint with the Melbourne Rebels in the inaugural Australian Rugby Championship season.[3] He went on to be drafted by the Blues for the 2009 Super 14 season.

After starting the 2010 Super rugby season by scoring 4 tries in the first three games, Hobbs suffered a fractured vertebra in his back [4] and underwent spine surgery in Los Angeles.[5] He studied at the University of Texas at Austin on exchange while he completed his rehab.[6]

In 2011, Hobbs re-signed with the Blues and NZRU for two more years.[6][7]

During the 2012 Super rugby season, Hobbs's father Jock died after a long battle with leukaemia. The 2012 ITM Cup saw Hobbs move north from Wellington to North Harbour. He played the first 3 matches before limping out of the Counties match early with ankle damage. Hobbs returned to the side for their final game against Tasman. At the end of the season he was granted an early release from his NZRU contract to take some time away from rugby.

In March 2013, Hobbs signed a one-year deal with the Panasonic Wild Knights in the Japan Top League. Panasonic won both the Japan Top League and Japan Cup championships in the 2013/14 season. At the completion of his contract with Panasonic, Hobbs signed with the NTT Docomo Red Hurricanes to remain in Japan for another two seasons.

After helping guide the NTT Docomo Red Hurricanes to their first ever win in the Japan Cup wildcard playoffs during the 2014/15 season, Hobbs was unable to take the field in the 2015/16 season due to undergoing shoulder surgery.

In 2016, Hobbs announced that he was taking a break from rugby to study for an MBA at Stanford University.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Match Reports – Highlanders beat Cheetahs". 28 February 2010. 
  2. ^ "Nearly 1000 bid final farewell to Jock Hobbs". Stuff.co.nz. 19 March 2012. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  3. ^ Melbourne Rebels photo
  4. ^ "Hobbs faces yet another comeback – 3 Sport – Video". 3 News. Retrieved 17 August 2011. 
  5. ^ Robson, Toby (20 September 2010). "Hobbs faces an ordeal he won't back away from". Stuff. New Zealand. Retrieved 17 August 2011. 
  6. ^ a b "Hobbs eager to grab opportunities with Blues". Stuff.co.nz. 1 February 2012. Retrieved 14 July 2012. 
  7. ^ "Blues announce squad for 2012". Stuff.co.nz. 2 November 2011. Retrieved 14 July 2012. 
  8. ^ "Slum spurs player to act". nzherald.co.nz. 17 April 2016. Retrieved 27 May 2016. 

External links[edit]