Michael Keating (public servant)

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Dr

Michael Keating

Secretary of the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations
In office
1983–1986
Secretary of the Department of Finance
In office
1986–1991
Secretary of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet
In office
1991–1996
Personal details
Born
Michael Stockton Keating

(1940-01-25) 25 January 1940 (age 79)
NationalityAustralia Australian
Alma materUniversity of Melbourne
Australian National University
OccupationPublic servant

Michael Stockton "Mike" Keating AC (born 25 January 1940) is a retired Australian senior public servant.

Early life[edit]

Michael Keating was born in 1940.[1] Keating graduated from the University of Melbourne with a first class honours degree in economics.[2] He then studied at the Australian National University, attaining his PhD in 1967.[2]

Career[edit]

Keating was appointed Secretary of the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations in May 1983.[3] In 1986 Keating shifted to head the Department of Finance.[4]

In 1991, Prime Minister Paul Keating (no relation) recommended that Michael Keating be appointed as Secretary to the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.[5] Keating retired from the role and left the Australian Public Service in 1996.[6]

Between 1997 and 2007, Keating was a Visiting Fellow in the Economics Program at the Australian National University.[7] His two principal fields of interest were: integration of social and economic policy, particularly as it relates to improving labour market outcomes; and research into the factors which are affecting Australia's governance, and how governments, institutions and policies are responding, and how relations between the citizen and the state are changing.[8][9]

In 2015 Keating was appointed as Chairman of The Committee for Sustainable Retirement Incomes.

Awards and honours[edit]

In January 1990, Keating was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in recognition of his public service.[10] Six years later he was made a Companion of the Order of Australia, for service to social, economic and public sector reform, particularly as a leader in organizational and management reform.[11]

In 2001, Keating was honoured with an honorary degree from Griffith University.[7]

Works[edit]

  • Who Rules? How Government Retains Control in a Privatised Economy, Federation Press, 2004, ISBN 1862875189[12]
  • With Geoff Dixon: Making Economic Policy in Australia. 1983–1988, Longman Cheshire, 1989, ISBN 0582868246[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Keating, Michael (1940-), National Library of Australia, retrieved 20 February 2014
  2. ^ a b "PS man to be visiting fellow". The Canberra Times. 5 September 1981. p. 8. Archived from the original on 20 February 2014.
  3. ^ Hawke, Robert (2 May 1983). "Unknown" (Press release). Archived from the original on 20 February 2014.
  4. ^ Hawke, Robert (10 February 1986). "Unknown" (Press release). Archived from the original on 1 November 2013.
  5. ^ Keating, Paul (27 December 1991). "Unknown" (Press release). Archived from the original on 20 February 2014.
  6. ^ Howard, John (9 April 1996). "Secretary, Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet" (Press release). Archived from the original on 1 November 2013.
  7. ^ a b Dr Michael Keating, AC: Curriculum vitae (PDF), Insight Economics Pty Ltd, archived from the original (PDF) on 25 January 2014
  8. ^ Dr Michael Keating AC, Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, archived from the original on 20 February 2014
  9. ^ Keating, Michael; Lambert, Simon (1998), From Welfare to Work: Improving the Interface of Tax and Social Security, University of Canberra. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling, ISBN 0858897393
  10. ^ Search Australian Honours: KEATING, Michael Stockton, Australian Government
  11. ^ Search Australian Honours: KEATING, Michael Stockton, Australian Government
  12. ^ Keating, Paul (10 November 2004). Launch of Who Rules: How Government Retains Control of a Privatised Economy (Speech). Sydney. Archived from the original on 1 March 2016.
  13. ^ Davis, Ian (2 August 1989). "Book details reform". The Canberra Times. p. 2.
Government offices
Preceded by
Mike Codd
Secretary of the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations
1983 – 1986
Succeeded by
Ed Visbord
Preceded by
Ian Castles
Secretary of the Department of Finance
1986 – 1991
Succeeded by
Steve Sedgwick
Preceded by
Mike Codd
Secretary of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet
1991 – 1996
Succeeded by
Max Moore-Wilton