Michael Kures

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Michael Kures
Country (sports)  United States
Residence Willow Springs, Illinois
Born (1964-07-25) July 25, 1964 (age 53)
Prague,
Czechoslovakia
Height 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Plays Right-handed
Prize money $59,332
Singles
Career record 10–23
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 107 (July 11, 1988)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 1R (1989)
Wimbledon 1R (1987)
US Open 2R (1984)
Doubles
Career record 5–9
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 211 (September 17, 1984)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open 2R (1989)

Michael Kures (born July 25, 1964) is a former professional tennis player from the United States.[1] He was born in Czechoslovakia, but moved to the United States at age four.[2]

Career[edit]

Kures, with partner Jonathan Canter, won the boys' doubles title at the 1982 US Open. The pair had been runner-up at the French Open earlier that year.[3]

He played collegiate tennis for the University of California, Los Angeles in the early 1980s.[2] In 1984, he was an All-American and a member of the NCAA championship winning team.[4] In 1985, he earned All-American honours again and made the Division I singles final, which he lost to Mikael Pernfors.[2]

On the Grand Prix tennis circuit, Kures had his best result at the Boston Pro Championships in 1988, beating Roberto Argüello, John Ross and world number-nine Brad Gilbert, before losing to Bruno Orešar in the quarter-finals.[2] He was a doubles semi-finalist at the 1987 Seoul Open, partnering Paul Chamberlin.[2]

Kures competed at the US Open four times and made the second round in 1984, defeating Hans Simonsson.[2] He was beaten by Mats Wilander in the second round.[2] His other appearances were in 1987 and 1988, as a singles player, and 1989, in the men's doubles draw. He also competed at the 1987 Wimbledon Championships and 1989 Australian Open.[2]

Challenger titles[edit]

Doubles: (1)[edit]

No. Year Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
1. 1984 Winnetka, United States Hard United States Dan Goldie Chile Ricardo Acuña
Chile Belus Prajoux
3–6, 6–4, 7–5

References[edit]