Michael Lemonick

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Michael Lemonick is an opinion editor at Scientific American, a former senior staff writer at Climate Central[1] and a former senior science writer at Time.[2] He has also written for Discover,[3] Yale Environment 360, Scientific American, and others, and has written a number of popular-level books on science and astrophysics, including The Georgian Star: How William and Caroline Herschel Revolutionized Our Understanding of the Cosmos,[4] Echo of the Big Bang,[5] Other Worlds: The Search For Life in the Universe,[6] and Mirror Earth: The Search for Our Planet's Twin.[7]

Son of Princeton University physics professor and administrator Aaron Lemonick[8] and native of Princeton, New Jersey, Lemonick graduated from Princeton High School, and then earned degrees at Harvard University and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He teaches communications and journalism at Princeton University.[9] He currently resides in Princeton with his wife Eileen Hohmuth-Lemonick, a photographer and photography instructor at Princeton Day School.

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

  • The Light at the Edge of the Universe: Leading Cosmologists on the Brink of a Scientific Revolution (May 11, 1993)
  • Other Worlds: The Search for Life in the Universe (May 14, 1998)
  • Echo of the Big Bang (Apr 24, 2005)
  • The Georgian Star: How William and Caroline Herschel Revolutionized Our Understanding of the Cosmos (Great Discoveries) (Dec 14, 2009)
  • Mirror Earth: The Search for Our Planet's Twin (Oct 29, 2013)
  • The Light at the Edge of the Universe: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Cosmology (Princeton Legacy Library) (July 14, 2014)
  • The Perpetual Now: A Story of Amnesia, Memory, and Love (Feb 7, 2017)

Essays and reporting[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bio climatecentral.org
  2. ^ Lemonick has written more than 50 cover stories on topics for Time magazine, including the topics of climate change, astronomy, addiction, and human origins.
  3. ^ The World's Hardest working Telescope
  4. ^ The Georgian Star
  5. ^ Echo of the Big Bang,
  6. ^ Other Worlds: The Search For Life in the Universe
  7. ^ Mirror Earth
  8. ^ http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/10-0310/moment.html
  9. ^ Lecturer in Astrophysical Sciences
  10. ^ Discover often changes the title of a print article when it is published online. This article is titled "Sending Robotic Repairmen to Space" online.

External links[edit]