Michael N. Nagler

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Michael N. Nagler (born January 20, 1937) is an American academic and peace activist.

Life[edit]

He graduated from New York University, and University of California, Berkeley with an M.A. and Ph.D. in Comparative Literature.[1] He is Professor Emeritus at University of California, Berkeley.[2] He founded and was at various times chair of the Peace And Conflict Studies Program.[3]

His work appeared in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists.[4]

Nagler has served as the co-Chair of the Peace and Justice Studies Association since 2008.

He is also on the advisory board of FFIPP-USA (Faculty for Israeli-Palestinian Peace-USA), a network of Palestinian, Israeli, and International faculty, and students, working in for an end of the Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories and just peace.[5]

He is currently president of the Metta Center for Nonviolence Education, an organization which tries to raise public awareness of nonviolence and keep activists informed.[6]

Nagler is also a Contributing Author for the online news and commentary site New Clear Vision.

Awards[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Michael N. Nagler (1974). Spontaneity and Tradition, A Study in the Oral Art of Homer. University of California Press. ISBN 978-0-520-02245-4.
  • Michael N. Nagler (2001). the search for a nonviolent future. Berkeley Hills Books. ISBN 978-1-893163-16-4.
  • The Upanishads. Afterword Michael N. Nagler; Translator Eknath Easwaran. Nilgiri Press. 2007. ISBN 978-1-58638-021-2.

Anthologies[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on July 26, 2011. Retrieved March 22, 2010.
  2. ^ "Faculty | Department of Classics". classics.berkeley.edu. Retrieved 2016-04-09.
  3. ^ https://books.google.com/books?id=hFeGNwAACAAJ&dq=Michael+N.+Nagler&lr=
  4. ^ Educational Foundation for Nuclear Science, Inc. (December 1981). Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. Educational Foundation for Nuclear Science, Inc. pp. 49–. ISSN 0096-3402.
  5. ^ http://www.ffipp.org/about_us# Archived June 8, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.
  6. ^ "Metta Center for Nonviolence--Promoting Nonviolence Worldwide". Metta Center. Retrieved 2016-04-09.
  7. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on July 26, 2011. Retrieved March 22, 2010.

External links[edit]