Michigan Department of Corrections

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Department of Corrections
Michigan State DOC.jpg
Michigan Department of Corrections seal 50 percent.jpg
Seal of the Michigan Department of Corrections
AbbreviationMDOC
Motto"Committed to Protect, Dedicated to Success"
Agency overview
Formed1953
Preceding agency
  • Prison Commission
Employees14,000(2017)
Annual budget$2 Billion (2010)[1]
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdictionMichigan, USA
Map of USA MI.svg
Map of Department of Corrections's jurisdiction.
Size97,990 square miles (253,800 km2)
Population10,003,422 (2008 est.)[2]
HeadquartersLansing, Michigan

Website
Michigan DOC Website
Michigan Department of Corrections Honor Guard at assembly before 27th Annual Candlelight Vigil at National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The Michigan Department of Corrections (MDOC) oversees prisons and the parole and probation population in the state of Michigan, United States. It has 31 prison facilities, and a Special Alternative Incarceration program, together composing approximately 41,000 prisoners. Another 71,000 probationers and parolees are under its supervision. (2015 figures)[4] The agency has its headquarters in Grandview Plaza in Lansing.[5]

History[edit]

MDOC previously contracted with Aramark for its food services. On July 13, 2015 it announced that it was switching to Trinity Services Group.[6]

Divisions[edit]

Correctional Facilities Administration[edit]

The Correctional Facilities Administration (CFA) is responsible for the state's prisons and camps, including the Special Alternative Incarceration (boot camp). CFA has administrative offices in Lansing where a Deputy Director oversees the network of secure facilities. The network is divided into two regions, and each region has a Regional Prison Administrator who has oversight over wardens. At the local level, the wardens oversee daily operations of the prisons and camps. CFA also manages several peripheral aspects of facility operation, including prisoner transportation, food service and classification.[7]

The state secure-facilities network supervises a diverse offender population. The physical plants also span centuries, from the Michigan Reformatory in Ionia (built in the late 1870s) to the modern Bellamy Creek Correctional Facility, which was completed in 2001.

Prisons[edit]

As of January 2017, thirty-one DOC facilities are open and in operation.[8]

The prisons are categorized into different security levels. A Secure Level I facility houses prisoners who are more easily managed within the network (even though they may have committed violent crimes). The state's Level V prisons house prisoners who pose maximum management problems, are a maximum security risk, or both. Some prisoners may have more than one security level.[9]

Field Operations Administration[edit]

The Field Operations Administration (FOA) is responsible for state probation and parole supervision as well as other methods of supervision, including the parole board. It also oversees the Detroit Detention Center and the Detroit Reentry Center. There are 105 field offices across the state.[10]

Operations Support Administration[edit]

The Operations Support Administration is responsible for oversight of departmental finances, personnel services - including training and recruitment of new employees, policy development, labor relations, and physical plant and environmental services.

See also[edit]

National:

References[edit]

  1. ^ 2010 State Budget
  2. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2008". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on March 22, 2009. Retrieved 2009-01-26.
  3. ^ Lawler, Emily (December 27, 2018). "Gov.-elect Whitmer names cabinet members". Flint Journal. Mlive Media Group. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  4. ^ Michigan Department of Corrections 2015 Annual Report
  5. ^ "eDOC - Contact the Michigan Department of Corrections." Michigan Department of Corrections. Retrieved on December 7, 2009.
  6. ^ Egan, Paul. "State to end prison food deal with Aramark" (Archive). Detroit Free Press at Lansing State Journal. July 13, 2015. Retrieved on July 14, 2015.
  7. ^ Michigan Department of Corrections site
  8. ^ "Prison Directory". Michigan Department of Corrections. Retrieved 2015-01-10.
  9. ^ "Glossary". michigan.gov. Michigan Department of Corrections. Retrieved 2015-07-28.
  10. ^ Michigan Department of Corrections site

External links[edit]