Pure Michigan Byway

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Pure Michigan Byways
Pure Michigan Byway marker
Highway marker for Pure Michigan Byways
Map of the Pure Michigan Byways
  Historic   Recreational   Scenic
System information
Maintained by MDOT
Length: 931.182 mi[2] (1,498.592 km)
Formed: June 22, 1993 (1993-06-22)[1]
Highway names
Interstates: Interstate nn (I-nn)
US Routes: US Highway nn (US nn)
State: M-nn
System links

A Pure Michigan Byway is the designation for a segment of the State Trunkline Highway System in the US state of Michigan that is a "scenic, recreational, or historic route that is representative of Michigan's natural and cultural heritage."[1] The designation was created with the name Michigan Heritage Route by the state legislature on June 22, 1993, and since then five historic, seven recreational and five scenic byways have been designated by the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT), and another two have been proposed. These byways have been designated in both the Upper and Lower peninsulas (UP, LP) of the state. The current name was adopted on December 30, 2014, and it references the Pure Michigan tourism marketing campaign.

To be listed as a Pure Michigan Byway, a road must be a state trunkline highway, and it must be nominated through a two-stage process. Candidates are evaluated based on a set of objective criteria by MDOT in a process that can take several years to complete. The criteria include a highway's relationship to sites or districts on the National Register of Historical Places, to recreational areas, or to scenic landscapes. Each candidate must be supported by local stakeholders, including the appropriate local units of government. Each byway has a local organization that produces a management plan for the roadway and the preservation of its surrounding environment.

Program[edit]

According to MDOT, the department's Pure Michigan Byway Program works with local communities, organizations, and government agencies to identify roads that access Michigan's "unique recreational, scenic and historic cultural treasures".[3] The program also attempts to preserve the unique and irreplaceable qualities of selected corridors, improve distinct roads in a careful and considerate way, and promote a greater awareness of and appreciation for the state's scenic, recreational, historical and cultural resources, according to the Federal Highway Administration. These actions provide economic benefits by stimulating tourism.[4] Staffers for State Representative Peter Pettalia of Presque Isle said that the point of the program, in context of the 2014 change to the Pure Michigan Byway name, was to get people to drive the selected roads and spend money at local businesses.[5]

Additions to the system are made when local organizations apply to MDOT through a two-stage process. First, a local organization proposes the addition, verifying that the suggested heritage route is a state trunkline highway and noting which local governments support the designation. MDOT reviews this pre-application to determine initial eligibility. If the proposed heritage route is determined to be eligible, the organization is asked to submit a full application to the department for approval.[6] The full process can take up to seven years to complete.[7] The MDOT director compiles a report annually that is submitted to the governor, members of the Michigan Legislature and members of the State Transportation Commission; this report details any new additions in the previous year and any changes or deletions affecting the system.[8]

Types and requirements[edit]

The three types of byways are defined in Public Act 69 of 1993, the legislation that originally established the system. The Legislature defined these types to be:

Historic
significant to the history, archeology, architecture, engineering, or culture of this state.
Recreational
facilities normally associated with leisure-time activities, including, but not limited to, parks, public access sites, wildlife refuges, forest areas, marinas, swimming areas, hiking trails, and sightseeing areas.
Scenic
an area of outstanding natural beauty whose features include, but are not limited to, significant natural features such as vegetation, land form, water, and open areas with exceptional vistas and views, that singly or in combination make that area unique and distinct in character.[1]

In his annual report to the State Legislature at the end of 2014, MDOT Director Kirk Steudle described an additional three categories of byway not listed in the legislation setting up the system.

Cultural
A state highway traversing an area with unique cultural and/or ethnic heritage amenities such as art galleries, theaters, opera houses, restaurants, markets, and music venues.
Archaeological
A state highway traversing a corridor with ruins, artifacts, and structural remains.
Natural
A state highway that traverses a corridor with natural features that are relatively undisturbed, unique geological landforms, vegetation, water bodies, or conservation areas.[9]

In establishing specific objective criteria related to the selection of potential byways, MDOT has set up limitations on these classifications. Regardless of classification, all byways are supported with a management plan for the corridor designed to deal with protection, preservation, and enhancement of the roadway. All routes are given specific termini points with a reasonable length. They must also have the backing of local units of government, landowners and organizations.[10] No specific criteria have been published for cultural, archaeological or natural byways.[9]

Historic byways are assessed based on the numbers of sites listed, or eligible for listing, on the National Register of Historic Places. These sites need to be visible from the route of the byway, or, in the case of historic districts, a "substantial portion of the district must lie adjacent to the highway".[10] Local organizations backing a proposed historic byway must also have promotional plans and demonstrate coordination with state agencies related to state history.[10]

Recreational byways must be used mainly for recreational purposes, connecting to one or more recreation sites. They can also connect multiple sites together with a common theme, and they are assessed on their scenic qualities with lower inclusion standards than scenic byways.[10]

Scenic byways must exclude commercial or industrial zones adjacent to the trunkline. These roads are also assessed on qualities such as the uniqueness, vividness, intactness, unity, and viewshed of the roadway and its surrounding environment as set up in department guidelines.[10]

History[edit]

Michigan Heritage Route signage
Historic Heritage Route marker
Recreational Heritage Route marker
Scenic Heritage Route marker
Before the system's name was changed in 2014, these signs were used for Historic, Recreational and Scenic Heritage Routes; new signs were unveiled in October 2015.

The Michigan Heritage Route System was created after Public Act 69 of 1993 was signed into law on June 22, 1993, going into effect immediately. The law required MDOT to set up specific criteria and procedures related to selecting and maintaining heritage routes, subject to approval of the Legislature.[1] Since the program was put into operation in 1993, 16 heritage routes have been approved by the department. The first two were approved in 1995 at opposite ends of the state: a scenic route along US Highway 41 (US 41) in the Keweenaw Peninsula region of the northern UP[11][12] and a historic route along M-125 in downtown Monroe in the southeastern corner of the LP.[13][14] The first recreational route was approved in 1998 along M-15 in the southeastern LP.[15] The newest byway of any type, the M-134 North Huron Byway along M-134 in the eastern up was dedicated in October 2015.[16] Since 2008, local groups have proposed the creation of a heritage route along the former West Michigan Pike on the western side of the LP[7] and a loop around Ontonagon County in the western UP.[8][17] As of December 22, 2014, only the US 31 proposal was active.[9]

The Legislature proposed another change to the system in 2013 to rename the Heritage Routes in the system to Pure Michigan Byways under a bill introduced in the state House of Representatives.[18] The bill passed in the House in March 2014,[5] and the state Senate during the lame duck session in December 2014.[19] Sponsors of the bill said that including the highways in the Pure Michigan tourism advertising campaign would provide promotional benefits, and they stated that the change "allows the state to comply with federal changes, which require the word 'route' be changed to 'byway'."[5] The bill received the governor's signature and was filed on December 30, 2014,[20] taking effect as Public Act 445 that day. MDOT had one year from that effective date to obtain a trademark license from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, owners of the Pure Michigan trademark, and to unveil the new signage bearing the updated program name.[21] They unveiled the new signage as part of the dedication of the M-134 North Huron Byway in October 2015.[16]

List[edit]

There are five historic, seven recreational and five scenic byways in Michigan, with two additional routes in various stages of proposal.

List of Pure Michigan Byways
Type Name Length (mi)[2] Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Date Description Ref(s).
Proposed Bridge to the Clouds 82.389 132.592 Loop in Ontonagon County Would follow US 45, M-26, M-38, M-64, and M-28 connecting Bruce Crossing, Ontonagon, Silver City and Bergland; proposal inactive as of December 22, 2014 [8][9][17]
Historic Center Avenue Heritage Route 1.474 2.372 Madison Avenue in Bay City Livingston Street in Bay City 1997 Originally named the "Bay City Historic Heritage Route"; follows M-25 through the Center Avenue Neighborhood Residential District in Bay City, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places [22][23][24]
Recreational Chief Noonday Trail Recreational Heritage Route 16.963 27.299 US 131 in Bradley M-43 near Hastings 1998 Follows M-179 in Allegan and Barry counties providing access to Gun Lake and the Yankee Springs State Recreation Area [25][26][27]
Scenic Copper Country Trail 47.617 76.632 Portage Lake Lift Bridge in Hancock M-26 in Copper Harbor 1995 Follows US 41 in the Copper Country; also designated as a National Scenic Byway by the Federal Highway Administration; first Scenic Heritage Route in the state [11][12]
Recreational Huron Shores Heritage Route 193.061 310.702 Cedar Street in Standish Nicolet Avenue in Mackinaw City 2004 Originally named the "Sunrise Side Coastal Highway"; follows US 23 along the Lake Huron shoreline [28][29]
Recreational I-69 Recreational Heritage Route 47.188 75.942 Indiana state line south of Kinderhook CalhounEaton county line 2004 Follows I-69 from the Indiana state line in Branch and Calhoun counties in the southern Lower Peninsula [30][31]
Historic Iron County Heritage Trail 15.577 25.069 M-189 (4th Avenue) in Iron River 5th Street in Crystal Falls 2000 Follows US 2 through Iron County past sites such as the Iron County Courthouse and the local museums on the area's iron mining heritage [32][33]
Scenic Leelanau Scenic Heritage Route 81.007 130.368 BenzieLeelanau county line south of Empire M-72 in Traverse City 2002 Follows M-22 (66.956 mi, 107.755 km) and M-109 (6.831 mi, 10.993 km) around the Leelanau Peninsula, along the Lake Michigan and Grand Traverse Bay shorelines and includes M-204 (7.220 mi, 11.619 km) across the peninsula [34]
Recreational M-134 North Huron Byway 50.233 80.842 I-75 north of St. Ignace Four Corners on Drummond Island 2015 Follows M-134 along the Lake Huron shoreline across the southeastern section of the Upper Peninsula and onto Drummond Island [16][17][35][36]
Historic Marshall's Territorial Road Heritage Route 2.052 3.302 Western Marshall city limits Eastern Marshall city limits 2001 Follows Business Loop I-94 along the former Territorial Road in downtown Marshall past 30 historical markers and four museums [37][38]
Historic Monroe Historic Heritage Route 2.115 3.404 Southern Monroe city limits Northern Monroe city limits 1995 Follows M-125 through downtown Monroe and next to the East Elm–North Macomb Street Historic District, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places [13][14][39][40]
Scenic Old Mission Peninsula Scenic Heritage Route 17.304 27.848 Peninsula Drive north of Traverse City Cul-de-sac at Old Mission Lighthouse 2008 Follows M-37 along the Old Mission Peninsula north of Traverse City through vineyards and orchards bounded by the East and West arms of Grand Traverse Bay [41][42]
Recreational Pathway to Family Fun Recreational Heritage Route 72.765 117.104 Waldron Road in Clarkston M-25 in Bay City 1998 Originally named the "Miles to Smiles Recreational Heritage Route"; follows M-15 from Clarkston in Oakland County to Bay City providing access to parks and campgrounds in the area [15][43]
Scenic Tahquamenon Scenic Byway 62.505 100.592 M-28 south of Newberry M-28 near Eckerman 2007 Originally a locally designated byway in 1998 named the Tahquamenon Heritage Trail and later named the Tahquamenon Scenic Heritage Route when recognized by the state; follows M-123 in an inverted U-shape north of M-28 in Luce and Chippewa counties past the Tahquamenon Falls State Park [35][44][45][46]
Scenic Tunnel of Trees Scenic Heritage Route 21.028 33.841 Western Harbor Springs city limits C-66/C-77 (State Road) in Cross Village 2003 Follows M-119 through the "Tunnel of Trees" [47][48]
Recreational UP Hidden Coast Recreational Heritage Trail 64.451 103.724 Wisconsin state line in Menominee Mather Avenue in Gladstone 2007 Follows M-35, US 2, and US 41 proving access to recreational areas along the Green Bay and Little Bay de Noc [49][50]
Historic US 12 Heritage Trail 210.367 338.553 Indiana state line in New Buffalo Woodward Avenue in Detroit 2004 Follows US 12 parallel to the route of an original 19th-century stagecoach trail from Detroit to Chicago across the southern Lower Peninsula, including segments previously designated separately along Michigan Avenue in Saline in May 2001 and in Lenawee County in October 2002 [51][52]
Proposed West Michigan Pike 168.238 270.753 Indiana state line south of Niles Ludington Would follow US 31 northward along the route of the former West Michigan Pike and along the Lake Michigan shoreline; application not yet submitted as of December 22, 2014 [7][9][53][54]
Recreational Woodward Avenue Recreational Heritage Route 25.475 40.998 Jefferson Avenue in Detroit Cesar E. Chavez Boulevard in Pontiac 1999 Follows M-1 and BL I-75/Bus. US 24 (Woodward Avenue) connecting to museums, theaters and parks in Metro Detroit; also designated the Automotive Heritage Trail All-American Road by the Federal Highway Administration and a part of the MotorCity National Heritage Area [55][56][57]

See also[edit]

Michigan has three National Forest Scenic Byways that run along county roads, which are ineligible to be Pure Michigan Byways:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Michigan Legislature (June 22, 1993). "Public Act 69 of 1993: Michigan Heritage Routes". Michigan Compiled Laws. Michigan Legislative Council. p. 1. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 27, 2014. Retrieved July 14, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation & Michigan Center for Shared Solutions and Technology Partnerships (2009). MDOT Physical Reference Finder Application (Map). Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 19, 2014. 
  3. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (n.d.). "Drive Home Our Heritage". Highway Programs. Michigan Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on August 16, 2014. Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  4. ^ Federal Highway Administration (n.d.). "Michigan: State Program". National Scenic Byway Program. Federal Highway Administration. Archived from the original on April 14, 2013. Retrieved July 14, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c Lehndorff, Becky (March 27, 2014). "Route US 23 Closer to Becoming Part of Pure Michigan Campaign". The Alpena News. Archived from the original on October 27, 2014. Retrieved October 14, 2014. 
  6. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (August 20, 2010). "How to Apply". Highway Programs. Michigan Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on August 16, 2014. Retrieved October 14, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c "Will Old US 31 Become a Michigan Heritage Route?". The Muskegon Chronicle. Chronicle News Service. March 31, 2008. Archived from the original on May 26, 2014. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c Steudle, Kirk T. (April 24, 2014). "Annual Report on the Status of Michigan's Heritage Route Program" (PDF) (Letter to Rick Snyder, Members of the Michigan State Legislature and Members of the Michigan State Transportation Commission). Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on October 27, 2014. Retrieved October 14, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b c d e Steudle, Kirk T. (December 22, 2014). "Annual Report on the Status of Michigan's Heritage Route Program" (PDF) (Letter to Rick Snyder, Members of the Michigan State Legislature and Members of the Michigan State Transportation Commission). Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 15, 2015. 
  10. ^ a b c d e Michigan Heritage Route Program (n.d.). Selection Criteria (PDF). Michigan Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on October 27, 2014. Retrieved October 14, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b Federal Highway Administration (n.d.). "Copper Country Trail: Official Designations". America's Byways. Federal Highway Administration. Archived from the original on June 21, 2013. Retrieved July 14, 2012. 
  12. ^ a b Meyer, Zlaty (June 29, 2008). "You Haven't Lived Here Until ... You've Topped Out At Copper Harbor". Detroit Free Press. p. B4. ISSN 1055-2758. OCLC 10345127 and 137343179. 
  13. ^ a b Federal Highway Administration (n.d.). "Monroe Street (M-125)". America's Byways. Federal Highway Administration. Archived from the original on October 18, 2011. Retrieved July 14, 2012. 
  14. ^ a b Federal Highway Administration (n.d.). "Monroe Street (M-125): Official Designations". America's Byways. Federal Highway Administration. Archived from the original on December 30, 2011. Retrieved July 14, 2012. 
  15. ^ a b Eastern Michigan Council of Governments (2013). M-15 Recreation Heritage Route Revised Management Plan. M-15 Heritage Route Management Committee. pp. 4, 7, 9. 
  16. ^ a b c "M-134 in UP Tapped as Pure Michigan's First Byway". Detroit Free Press. Associated Press. October 14, 2015. Retrieved October 15, 2015. 
  17. ^ a b c Michigan Department of Transportation (n.d.). Michigan Byways (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 21, 2012. Retrieved June 19, 2014. 
  18. ^ Hubbard, Brandon (November 15, 2013). "Iconic State Highways Could Get Pure Michigan Name Change". Petoskey News-Review. Archived from the original on October 27, 2014. Retrieved October 14, 2014. 
  19. ^ Michigan Legislature (n.d.). "House Bill 5072 (2013)". Michigan Legislative Council. Archived from the original on January 23, 2014. Retrieved December 17, 2014. 
  20. ^ Wurfel, Sara & Murray, Dave (December 31, 2014). "Gov. Rick Snyder Signs Bills Focused on Creating Good Government Practices: Also Signs Memorial Highway, 'Pure Michigan Byways' Bills" (Press release). Office of the Governor. Archived from the original on January 3, 2015. Retrieved January 1, 2015. 
  21. ^ Michigan Legislature (December 30, 2014). "Public Act 445 of 2014" (PDF). Michigan Legislative Council. p. 222. Retrieved January 23, 2015. 
  22. ^ Maxwell, Terrion (October 23, 1997). "Bay City Receives Historic Heritage Route Designation" (Press release). Michigan Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on December 12, 2008. Retrieved May 10, 2008. 
  23. ^ Center Avenue Heritage Route Trust (n.d.). "Center Avenue Heritage Route (M-25)" (Map). Heritage Route Application, Appendix B: Regional and Route Location Maps. Scale not given. Bay City, MI: Center Avenue Heritage Route Trust. 
  24. ^ Daly, Matthew L.; Herman, Jennifer L. & Hannan, Caryn, eds. (2008). Michigan Encyclopedia. vol. 1. Hamburg, MI: State History Publications. p. 99. ISBN 978-1-8785-9294-1. OCLC 226317449. 
  25. ^ Randall, Gary L. (February 3, 1999). "House Chamber, Lansing, Wednesday, February 3, 1999". Journal of the House of Representatives, 90th Legislature. Retrieved August 4, 2013. 
  26. ^ Township of Yankee Springs (n.d.). Chief Noonday Trail Corridor Map (Map). Scale not given. Township of Yankee Springs. 
  27. ^ Google (February 8, 2011). "Overview Map of M-179" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved February 8, 2011. 
  28. ^ "US 23 Heritage Route Gets Official Designation". Iosco County News-Herald (East Tawas, MI). May 12, 2004. Archived from the original on October 27, 2014. Retrieved July 14, 2012. 
  29. ^ Northeast Michigan Council of Governments; East Central Michigan Planning and Development Regional Commission (2009). US 23 Huron Shores Heritage Route Management Plan. Northeast Michigan Council of Governments. 
  30. ^ Baker, Gary (October 9, 2004). "Stretch of I-69 Designated as MDOT Recreation Heritage Route". Coldwater Daily Reporter. News section. ISSN 0745-6794. OCLC 9399135. 
  31. ^ I-69 Recreation Heritage Route Management Team (n.d.). "Attachment A: Narrative Description of Proposed Route". I-69 Recreation Heritage Route Application. I-69 Recreation Heritage Route Management Team. p. 1. 
  32. ^ Western UP Planning & Development (October 2013). "Figure 2: Corridor Map" (Map). Iron County Heritage Trail Corridor Management Plan. Scale not given. Friends of the Iron County Heritage Trail. pp. 1, 7. 
  33. ^ Nelson, Steve (July 27, 2000). "Designation of the Iron County Heritage Trail" (Letter to Margaret Barondess). Crystal Falls, MI: Michigan State University Extension. 
  34. ^ Leelanau Scenic Heritage Route Committee (n.d.). "The Leelanau Scenic Heritage Route" (PDF). Northwest Michigan Council of Governments. p. 6. Retrieved July 14, 2012. 
  35. ^ a b Eppley, Jonathan (October 23, 2008). "Plan Would Make M-134 a Heritage Route: Regional Planning Commission Sees Economic Benefits". St. Ignace News. p. A1. OCLC 36250796. Archived from the original on October 27, 2014. Retrieved July 14, 2012. 
  36. ^ North Huron Recreational Heritage Route Advisory Committee (2010). North Huron Recreational Heritage Route Corridor Management Plan (PDF). Eastern UP Regional Planning & Development Commission. Archived from the original on October 27, 2014. Retrieved October 22, 2014. 
  37. ^ Hinde, Jill (January 12, 2001). "West Michigan Avenue Designated as a Michigan Heritage Route". The Marshall Chronicle. p. 1. Retrieved August 4, 2013 – via NewspaperArchive.com. (subscription required (help)). 
  38. ^ "Marshall's Michigan Avenue Honored as Michigan Heritage Route (Historic)". The Marshall Chronicle. October 29, 2001. p. 15. Retrieved August 4, 2013 – via NewspaperArchive.com. (subscription required (help)). 
  39. ^ "Year 2000 Nomination Form". Monroe Historic Heritage Route Corridor Management Plan. City of Monroe. 2000. 
  40. ^ National Park Service (November 11, 2009). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. Retrieved October 14, 2014. 
  41. ^ Skinner, Victor (March 7, 2008). "M-37 on Old Mission Designated Scenic Route". Traverse City Record-Eagle. OCLC 30098364. Archived from the original on April 14, 2014. Retrieved August 15, 2013. 
  42. ^ Northwest Michigan Council of Governments & Michigan Center for Geographic Information (September 1, 2000). "M-37 Proposed Heritage Route" (Map). Old Mission Peninsula Scenic Heritage Route. Scale not given. Traverse City: M-37 Scenic Heritage Route Nominating Team. pp. 6, 22. 
  43. ^ Graham, David V. (July 8, 1998). "Road Less Traveled Getting Some Respect: M-15, Old 'Up North' Route Gets State Designation". The Flint Journal. p. C1. OCLC 9974225. 
  44. ^ Lake, James (November 9, 2007). "M-123 Tahquamenon Scenic Heritage Route Expanded" (Press release). Michigan Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on October 7, 2012. Retrieved June 19, 2014. 
  45. ^ Tahquamenon Scenic Heritage Route Committee (2007). Tahquamenon Scenic Heritage Route Management Plan (PDF). Sault Ste. Marie, MI: Eastern Upper Peninsula Regional Planning and Development Commission. p. 2. Archived from the original on October 27, 2014. Retrieved June 19, 2014. 
  46. ^ Tahquamenon Scenic Heritage Route Committee (n.d.). "The Tahquamenon Scenic Byway: 63 Miles, Endless Memories" (PDF). Eastern Upper Peninsula Regional Planning and Development Commission. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  47. ^ Gray, Fred (June 26, 2003). "Scenic Heritage Route Dedicated Saturday". Petoskey News-Review. Archived from the original on October 27, 2014. Retrieved August 4, 2013. 
  48. ^ M-119 Tunnel of Trees Scenic Heritage Route Committee (2008). "M-119 Scenic Views" (Map). M-119 Tunnel of Trees Scenic Heritage Route Management Plan Update. Scale not given. Traverse City: Northwest Michigan Council of Governments. 
  49. ^ "MDOT Declares UP Road as Heritage Route". Negaunee, MI: WLUC-TV. August 28, 2007. 
  50. ^ UP Hidden Coast Recreation Heritage Route Planning Committee (September 2013). "Chapter 1: Introduction". UP Hidden Coast Recreation Heritage Route Management Plan. Escanaba, MI: Central Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Regional Commission. pp. 1–2. 
  51. ^ Barnett, LeRoy (2004). A Drive Down Memory Lane: The Named State and Federal Highways of Michigan. Allegan Forest, MI: Priscilla Press. pp. 51, 288. ISBN 1-886167-24-9. OCLC 57425393. 
  52. ^ SmithGroup JJR & Michigan State University Department of Park, Recreation and Tourism Resources (December 2003). US 12 Historic Heritage Trail Application & Corridor Management Plan. US  12 Heritage Trail Council. pp. ES‑1, 1‑3. 
  53. ^ Lupo, Lee (May 5, 2008). "Return of the Pike". The Muskegon Chronicle. Archived from the original on May 26, 2014. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  54. ^ Kloosterman, Stephen (December 8, 2011). "Get Your Kicks ... on the West Michigan Pike". Holland Sentinel. Archived from the original on May 26, 2014. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  55. ^ Ballou, Brian (August 4, 1999). "Woodward Winner Storied Avenue Labeled a Michigan Heritage Road: Plans In Works For Continuous Identity From Detroit To Pontiac". Detroit Free Press. p. B1. ISSN 1055-2758. OCLC 10345127 and 137343179. Retrieved July 14, 2012. (subscription required (help)). 
  56. ^ Tamboer, Andrea (October 28, 2009). "Woodward Avenue (M-1) Gets All-American Road Designation". MLive (Detroit: Booth Newspapers). Archived from the original on October 27, 2014. Retrieved July 14, 2012. 
  57. ^ Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (1998). "Woodward Avenue Heritage Route Designation" (Map). Woodward Avenue Heritage Route Management Plan. Scale not given. Detroit: Southeast Michigan Council of Governments. p. 9. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing / Google