Michiru Ōshima

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Michiru Ōshima
Born (1961-03-16) March 16, 1961 (age 57)
Nagasaki, Japan
GenresClassical, orchestral, electronic, ambient
Occupation(s)Composer, producer
Years active1982–present
Websitemichiru-oshima.net

Michiru Ōshima (大島ミチル, Ōshima Michiru, born March 16, 1961) is a Japanese composer who has worked on several video games, films, and televisions. Her works include composition for the video games Genghis Khan II: Clan of the Gray Wolf for Super NES,[1] Ico for PlayStation 2,[2] Legend of Legaia for the PlayStation and its PlayStation 2 sequel Legaia 2: Duel Saga, Arc the Lad III, and an orchestral arrangement of a Zelda medley for the Wii and Nintendo GameCube game The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess.[3] In addition to video game music, she has composed music for Godzilla vs. Megaguirus[4] and Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla[5] movies and scores for numerous anime television series, including Fullmetal Alchemist[6] (and the motion picture Fullmetal Alchemist the Movie: Conqueror of Shamballa),[7] Nabari no Ou,[8] Queen Emeraldas,[9] Xam'd: Lost Memories,[10] Arc the Lad,[11] and Weathering Continent.[12] She was also the composer for a Japanese stage musical adaptation of the classic Hollywood film Roman Holiday.[13] Her latest work includes the composition of several music tracks for the highly acclaimed Chinese espionage thriller film: The Message 《风声》in 2009.

Awards and nominations[edit]

Awards
Nominations
  • 1998: Japanese Academy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Music for Paradise Lost[16]
  • 2001: Japanese Academy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Music for Nagasaki Burabura Bushi[17]
  • 2003: Japanese Academy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Music for The Sun Also Rises and Copycat Criminal[18]
  • 2004: Japanese Academy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Music for Like Asura[19]
  • 2006: Japanese Academy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Music for Year One in the North[20]
  • 2007: Japanese Academy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Music for Memories of Tomorrow[21]
  • 2016: Japanese Academy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Music for 125 Years Memory[22]

Compositions[edit]

Film soundtracks (selective)[edit]

Anime soundtracks (selective)[edit]

Video games soundtracks (selective)[edit]

Drama soundtracks (selective)[edit]

  • 2001: Sayonara, Ozu Sensei
  • 2002: Gokusen
  • 2002: Satorare
  • 2003: Tenshi mitai
  • 2005: Yume de Aimashou
  • 2006: Oishii Proposal
  • 2006: CA to Oyobi
  • 2006: Regatta
  • 2007: Hotelier
  • 2007: Watashi wa Kai ni Naritai
  • 2008: Yasuko to Kenji
  • 2010: Misaki Number One!!

Selected concerts and projects[edit]

  • 1980: Symphony No.1: Orasho
  • 2005: For the East (with the Ravel Quartet)
  • 2006: London Essay (with Dai Kimura)
  • 2007: Le Premier amour (from the album "Smile" by Japanese violist Emiri Miyamoto)
  • 2007: Amanda (with Kaori Muraji (classical guitar) and the Orchestre des Virtuoses de Paris)
  • 2009: Concerto for saxophone (with Daniel Gremelle (saxophone) and the Tokyo City Philharmonic Orchestra)
  • 2010: Concerto for viola (with Pierre Lenert (viola) and the Kyushu Symphony Orchestra)
  • 2011: Ganbalo Nippon (short film The Orchestra in Hot Air Balloon for Japan[24])
  • 2011: Vocalise (with the mezzo-soprano Irina De Baghy for Festival Sérénade in Surgères[25])
  • 2011: Requiem ~ It lies at the bottom of the sea (with Ensemble Lucilin in Luxembourg)
  • 2011: In 27 Pieces: The Hilary Hahn Encores (musical project with the violinist Hilary Hahn)
  • 2013: Viola Sonata (with Pierre Lenert (viola) and Ariane Jacob (piano) for Festival Sérénade in Surgères in France)
  • 2013: Concerto for piano quartet with Orchestra (with Musicians of Opera de Paris and the Kyushu Symphony Orchestra)
  • 2015: Symphony No.2: Since 1945 (with the Kyushu Symphony Orchestra and Hiroko Kokubu (piano))
  • 2017: Symphonic Suite "Sama" (with the Kansai Philharmonic Orchestra)
  • 2018: "Augustus": Suite for Orchestra and Chorus (with the Kansai Philharmonic Orchestra and the Osaka Prefectural Yuhigaoka High School Music Department)
  • 2018: Jin & Rin: 2 Rhapsodies for Clarinet, Marimba and Orchestra (with Richard Stoltzman (clarinet), Mika Stoltzman (marimba) and the Kansai Philharmonic Orchestra)
  • 2018: Concerto for Koto and Shakuhachi (with Chiaki Endo (koto), Dozan Fujiwara (shakuhachi) and the Kansai Philharmonic Orchestra)
  • 2018: Musical theatre Sanza and Okuni

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Discography 1990-1992". Michiru Oshima Official Site (in Japanese). Retrieved 2008-09-22.
  2. ^ "Melody light comfort that invites the ultimate healing of hard Romantic. ... Released Soon!" (in Japanese). HMV. 2003-06-01. Retrieved 2009-08-06. 大島ミチルが手掛けたゲーム・サントラICO霧の中の旋律ではLiberaリベラのヴォーカリストSteven Geraghtyスティーブン・ガラティがヴォーカルで参加" – "Oshima Michiru who managed the game soundtrack for ICO with vocals by Steven Geraghty of Libera
  3. ^ "Inside Zelda part 4: Natural Rhythms of Hyrule". Nintendo Power. 195: 56–58. September 2005. Archived from the original on 2014-08-11. Retrieved 2009-08-06.
  4. ^ "Godzilla × Megaguirus: The G Extermination Strategy Soundtrack" (in Japanese). Tower Records. Retrieved 2009-08-06. こちらのサウンドトラックは大島ミチルによるスコア。" – "This soundtrack score is by Oshima Michiru.[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ "Godzilla × Mechagodzilla Original Soundtrack Record [Soundtrack]" (in Japanese). Amazon.com. Retrieved 2009-08-06. 音楽を手がけたのは、CMやドラマのサントラなどでも大活躍中の大島ミチル。" – "Oshima Michiru was very active in producing the music, including in the commercials, the drama soundtrack, etc.
  6. ^ "Fullmetal Alchemist (Hagane no Renkin Jutsushi) Original Soundtrack". CDJapan. Retrieved 2009-08-06.
  7. ^ "Theatrical Feature Fullmetal Alchemist The Conqueror of Shambala - Original Soundtrack". CDJapan. Retrieved 2009-08-06.
  8. ^ "Nabari no Ou Staff Cast" (in Japanese). TV Tokyo. Retrieved 2009-08-06. 音楽: 大島ミチル(「鋼の錬金術師」、映画「椿三十郎」)" – "Music: Oshima Michiru (Fullmetal Alchemist, the film Sanjuro)
  9. ^ "Official Queen Emeraldas site - OVA「クイーンエメラルダス」". emeraldas.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 2009-08-08.
  10. ^ "Official Xam'd: Lost Memories site - Staff". xamd.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 2009-08-07.
  11. ^ スタッフ紹介 (in Japanese). Sony Music Japan. Archived from the original on 2012-10-12. Retrieved 2009-08-08.
  12. ^ 風の大陸 (in Japanese). NHK. Archived from the original on 2009-10-22. Retrieved 2009-08-08.
  13. ^ ローマの休日 (in Japanese). Amazon.com. Retrieved 2009-08-08.
  14. ^ ゆうばり国際ファンタスティック映画祭 (in Japanese). Yubari International Fantastic Film Festival. Archived from the original on 2010-02-02. Retrieved 2009-08-08.
  15. ^ "Tokyo Anime Fair: Award Winners". Anime News Network. 2006-03-27. Retrieved 2008-04-08.
  16. ^ 第21回 日本アカデミー賞 (in Japanese). Nippon Academy-shō Association. Archived from the original on April 28, 2009. Retrieved 2015-11-11.
  17. ^ 第24回 日本アカデミー賞 (in Japanese). Nippon Academy-shō Association. Archived from the original on April 28, 2009. Retrieved 2015-11-11.
  18. ^ 第26回 日本アカデミー賞 (in Japanese). Nippon Academy-shō Association. Archived from the original on April 28, 2009. Retrieved 2015-11-11.
  19. ^ 第27回 日本アカデミー賞 (in Japanese). Nippon Academy-shō Association. Archived from the original on May 24, 2009. Retrieved 2015-11-11.
  20. ^ 第29回 日本アカデミー賞 (in Japanese). Nippon Academy-shō Association. Archived from the original on May 14, 2009. Retrieved 2015-11-11.
  21. ^ 第30回 日本アカデミー賞 (in Japanese). Nippon Academy-shō Association. Archived from the original on May 25, 2009. Retrieved 2015-11-11.
  22. ^ "第39回日本アカデミー賞優秀賞決定!". japan-academy-prize.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved March 8, 2016.
  23. ^ "やがて君になる【公式】10月よりTVアニメ放送開始! on Twitter". Twitter. Retrieved 2018-08-18.
  24. ^ "Association Ganbalo". ganbalonippon.jimdo.com. Archived from the original on June 14, 2012. Retrieved 2015-11-11.
  25. ^ https://sites.google.com/site/festivalserenadedesurgeres/home/serenade-2011[dead link]

External links[edit]