Mick Clough

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Mick Clough
MP
Member of the
New South Wales Legislative Assembly
for Bathurst
In office
19 September 1981 – 22 February 1988
Preceded by Clive Osborne
Succeeded by David Berry
In office
25 May 1991 – 5 March 1999
Preceded by David Berry
Succeeded by Gerard Martin
Member of the
New South Wales Legislative Assembly
for Blue Mountains
In office
1 May 1976 – 28 August 1981
Preceded by Harold Coates
Succeeded by Bob Debus
Personal details
Born Ralph James Clough
22 October 1927
Warialda, New South Wales
Died 12 August 2008(2008-08-12) (aged 80)
Perth, Western Australia
Nationality  Australia
Political party Labor
Spouse(s) Doreen Clough (née Frost)
Children 1 daughter, 2 sons
Occupation Postal officer, motel proprietor
Website NSW Legislative Assembly webpage

Ralph James "Mick" Clough (22 October 1927 – 12 August 2008) was an Australian politician, He was an Labor Party Member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1976 to 1981, representing the electorate of Blue Mountains and representing the electorate of Bathurst from 1981 to 1988 and again from 1991 to 1999.[1]

Private life[edit]

Clough was born to Michael "Gordon" Clough and Irene Clough (née Smith) in Warialda, New South Wales on 22 October 1927. Although christened Ralph James he was known as "little Mick" after his father.[2]

Clough attended schools in Warialda, Granville, Hornsby and then St Patrick's College, Strathfield.[2]

Early years[edit]

After leaving school he followed his father's occupation and worked for the Postmaster-General's Department then Australia Post as a telegraphist and postmaster for a total of 34 years in New South Wales, South Australia and Western Australia before entering politics.[1] As a telegram boy during World War II, he was often an unwelcome sight, bringing bad news of loved ones.[2] He served as a member of the Citizens Military Force from 1948 to 1964.[1]

In 1951, Clough, aged 24, married Doreen Frost and they had three children: Elizabeth, Peter and David.[2] Peter Clough went on to play interstate cricket for Tasmania and Western Australia,[3] and was inducted into the Tasmanian Cricket Hall of Fame.[4]

Having joined the Australian Labor Party in 1948,[1] Clough stood unsuccessfully in the 1973 State election for the New South Wales Legislative Assembly in the electoral district of Blue Mountains.[5] He entered public office as an alderman on the Blue Mountains City Council from 1974 to 1979.[6]

New South Wales state political career[edit]

In 1976 Clough again contested the seat of Blue Mountains, this time winning the election and reversing the victory of the independent sitting member Harold Coates three years earlier.[7] Clough was subsequently re-elected in the 1978 State election.[8]

In the 1981 State election, following an electoral boundary adjustment,[6] Clough stood for election in the electoral district of Bathurst which he won defeating Country Party of Australia sitting member, Clive Osborne with a margin of 0.05%.[9] He was subsequently re-elected to that seat in the 1984 State election.[10]

At the 1988 State election, Clough lost the seat to Liberal candidate David Berry.[11] He contested the 1991 State election, regaining the seat from Berry.[12] Clough retained the seat at the 1995 State election.[13] He decided not to contest the 1999 State election and retired from public life. Former Lithgow Mayor, Gerard Martin, successfully retained the seat for Labor.

Clough did not achieve a higher office during his lengthy parliamentary career. (He did, however, serve as Acting Chairman of Committees for a short time in 1997).[1]

Friends and colleagues recalled Clough as a tough fighter for his electorate.[6][14][15] During his terms in office his achievements included Bathurst's Macquarie Homes retirement village.[16] He was a strong opponent of privatisation of power stations, financial deregulation and cuts to local services.[2]

After politics[edit]

Following his retirement from politics in 1999, Clough and his wife Doreen operated the Coolawin Gardens Motel in Nambucca Heads.[1]

In 2002 Clough retired to Perth, Western Australia where he died on 12 August 2008 following a long battle with bowel cancer.[17][18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Mr (Mick) Ralph James CLOUGH (1927 - 2008)". Members of Parliament. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 19 June 2010.
  2. ^ a b c d e Stephens, Tony (2008-08-14). "Old-fashioned Labor man who worked for ordinary people". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  3. ^ "Peter Clough". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  4. ^ "Tasmania's Hall of Fame". tascricket.com.au. 1 April 2008. Archived from the original on 16 January 2008. Retrieved 14 September 2008.
  5. ^ "Blue Mountains - 1973". Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  6. ^ a b c "Mick Clough died in Perth". Lithgow Mercury. 2008-09-14. Retrieved 2008-09-14.[permanent dead link]
  7. ^ "Blue Mountains - 1976". Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  8. ^ "Blue Mountains - 1978". Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  9. ^ "Bathurst - 1981". Parliament of New South Wales. Archived from the original on 24 May 2011. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  10. ^ "Bathurst - 1984". Parliament of New South Wales. Archived from the original on 24 May 2011. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  11. ^ "Bathurst - 1988". Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  12. ^ "Bathurst - 1991". Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  13. ^ "Bathurst - 1995". Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  14. ^ "Long-time NSW MP Clough dies". ABC News. Australia. 2008-08-13. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  15. ^ "Memorial for battlers' champion supporter". Western Advocate. 20 August 2008. Archived from the original on 13 July 2012. Retrieved 14 September 2008.
  16. ^ Jones, Terry (13 August 2008). "Sad passing of Mick Clough". Western Advocate. Archived from the original on 12 July 2012. Retrieved 14 September 2008.
  17. ^ "Former state politician Mick Clough dies". The Sydney Morning Herald. 2008-08-12. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  18. ^ Jones, Terry (2008-08-14). "Flood of tributes for fighter". Western Advocate. Retrieved 2008-09-14.[permanent dead link]

External links[edit]

Parliament of New South Wales
Preceded by
Harold Coates
Member for Blue Mountains
1976–1981
Succeeded by
Bob Debus
Preceded by
Clive Osborne
Member for Bathurst
1981–1988
Succeeded by
David Berry
Preceded by
David Berry
Member for Bathurst
1991–1999
Succeeded by
Gerard Martin